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Tips/gear for women
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Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Testing some pants this morning. on 10/08/2009 14:37:17 MDT Print View

If I'm even aware of the pants, they are NOs.

z

Edited by backpackerchick on 10/08/2009 21:04:29 MDT.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Drinks on 10/08/2009 14:41:41 MDT Print View

I usually heat up water as needed but in winter I will carry an insulated mug and make a big jug of tea before leaving camp. That way I can sip away :-)

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Commuter Mug on 10/08/2009 14:47:33 MDT Print View

Do you sip as you walk?!

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Specific advice for women? on 10/08/2009 14:49:10 MDT Print View

Underwear is probably the main difference design wise! You MUST find the PERFECT underwear. The wrong underwear is worse than no underwear.

Edited by backpackerchick on 10/08/2009 14:50:12 MDT.

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
A couple other women specific products on 10/08/2009 16:23:47 MDT Print View

The funnels and reusable sponge tampons. I have NOT tried either. The funnel sounds potentially useful if it could enable one to use a pee bottle. The sponge kind of grosses me out.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Commuter Mug on 10/08/2009 17:12:38 MDT Print View

I do actually ;-) I mastered eating and walking as well...lol! I have one lightweight mug that was a straw as well. I love my herbal teas in the morning - it encourages me to stay hydrated, something I can be bad at.

On underwear, I don't care about fashion and often wear the worst granny panties around as they don't bind, ride up or cut in. As long as it works I don't worry about styling ;-)

Lori Pontious
(lori999) - M

Locale: Central Valley
re: on 10/08/2009 17:32:03 MDT Print View

I have the feeling the two of us aren't going to be doing the splits anytime soon... Here's to the granny panty posse. :)

Leslie Bell
(Ftsp) - MLife

Locale: New York
Underwear and splits on 10/08/2009 18:50:48 MDT Print View

Yeah, no splits for me either. Not even close.

I actually tried a pair of the soy underwear and quite liked it. They are easy to rinse out and not smelly. The price is a little hefty but if they don't wear out too quickly it might be worth it. I'll send in a review in a couple of years if they stand the test of time;)


Now I'm gonna be on the lookout for a mug before my next hike! Maybe we can come up with a multi-purpose version (wrap your emergency duct tape around it for extra insulation?).

Lori Pontious
(lori999) - M

Locale: Central Valley
re: mug on 10/08/2009 19:02:32 MDT Print View

The REI insulated mug isn't bad... about five ounces. I've also worked up a reflectix covered ziploc container with screw on lid... easy to slice a sipper slot in the lid.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Underwear and splits on 10/08/2009 20:46:43 MDT Print View

Lol..I can barely bend over currently due to my growing belly. I am now trying to find hiking underwear for it and that ain't happening. So I ended up just accepting that for the next couple months I'll be wearing below the belly ones with pants that have stretch panels to my chin. Sexy, eh? Hubba Hubba!

If I did the splits I'd need help getting back up ;-)

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Underwear for the pregnant athlete on 10/08/2009 21:02:32 MDT Print View

Can't you just wear bikini underwear under the belly?

I will say, I can not imagine wearing a thong for outdoor/endurance sports! But there are certainly a lot of them on the market so some of you girls must be wearing them.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Underwear for the pregnant athlete on 10/08/2009 22:22:40 MDT Print View

Maternity panties go under the belly with full butt coverage. But pants go up to your boobs with the panels (you can get really cute pants these days at least!) So what you get is this weird limbo where you wonder if your underpants are going to fall off while your pants will creep to your chin. Went hiking this week and spent half the time hiking up my underwear and rolling down the stretch panel ;-P

Regular bikini underwear does work for some ladies but if you are on the second or further kid, lets just say the belly starts earlier. While I can wear most of my pre-belly underwear, they are just not comfy over my hips (which do get a bit bigger while pg). The maternity ones curve up more, onto the hips, but sling under the belly.

I am currently hiking in cotton pants, no choice there. At least I kept my winter hiking pants that are WP/B and are 2 sizes 2 big. I can fit in them come December ;-)

But no loss really, this one is hanging off my rib cage and I can barely breathe when I hike uphill. To say the least....I went from 15 to 20 mile days in June to 2 mile days in September. Some women can be hard core athletes I suppose, not me. All I wanna do is sleep anyways ;-)

Elena Lee
(lenchik101) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest (USA)
questions about thermos and down vest on 10/09/2009 13:12:51 MDT Print View

Leslie:

Thermos: No, too heavy! worst comes to worst, you can carry a Nalgene and put some boiling water into it, and stuck it into sleeping bag if your are totally freezing.

Down Vest: i agree, but it could be a good winter additional layer to boost your system. especially in high aerobic activity when putting parka is too warm (sweat) but just a synthetic shirt is too cold (core is cold). could be also good when you stop and take a break.

in any case, you will get cold. it is just a question of when, and how you manage it. suggestion: get out in the winter for a weekend and camp with someone you trust, get frosty (but not hypothermic, of course!) after this, you'd have the experience with REAL cold and when it gets cold in the shoulder season you'd know what to expect and you'd know your limits, you'd stretch out your "cold tolerance muscle", so to speak. you'd also find out what works and what doesn't for you. we can make hundreds of suggestions, but you only know how your body reacts, so test your layering system before you get out there.

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Cold -- you already know about this! on 10/09/2009 13:42:43 MDT Print View

Leslie, you come from a part of the US where it can get pretty darn COLD and wet. Sure you've spent time upstate too. Even, if you haven't done a ton of hiking, you probably know if you're someone who gets cold easier than others. Even inside, are you the only one with that heavy sweater on? That might give you a launching point as you think about gear systems. In other words, what's you're everyday gear system. There seem to be a lot of SoCal people on this board. I'm currently in the LA area but have lived in numerous climes. Cold in LA isn't the same as cold in upstate NY. And cold in the high Sierras is not the same as cold in the Colorado Rockies! It's really not that hard. It's easy to over-analyze.

Edited by backpackerchick on 10/09/2009 13:56:53 MDT.

Leslie Bell
(Ftsp) - MLife

Locale: New York
Trying out gear on 10/09/2009 13:57:39 MDT Print View

I'll be hiking the next 2-3 weekends with a possible overnight at the end of October, so I'll get to do a little testing. It won't be too cold yet (highs in the 60s, lows in the 50s so far).

Even though I hate to be cold, I love getting out of the city and hiking so I'll figure out pretty quickly what I need so I can keep going as late in the season as possible. As you all know already, once you're hooked there is no stopping (maybe just slowing down occationally--right Sarah?).

Thanks for all of the suggestions.

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Thermos on 10/09/2009 14:08:12 MDT Print View

BTW, thermos for day hiking would be sweet. Usually not that organized, though. If you are intending to have a hot meal on your day hikes, I think a ready made one in a thermos would be easier than dragging along a cooker. Also, maybe for base camp hiking -- where you walk in a bit and set up a camp then launch out for day trips. But hauling it around for days at a time with all your other gear. No for me.

Edited by backpackerchick on 10/09/2009 14:14:00 MDT.

Kathleen B
(rosierabbit) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Growing belly? on 10/09/2009 18:07:45 MDT Print View

Wait a minute. Rewind. Play.

Growing belly? Maternity underwear? Sarah?

Did I miss an announcement somewhere? Here I am in Kansas City for 4 days for a wedding (Mr. B's cousin's daughter, etc.) and I just found a computer because I am not interested in watching the Final Four in baseball, or whatever it is, and I am trying to catch up on the important things in life and I think you're saying you're pregnant?!!!! Congratulations!!!!! Due date? Oh, this is so exciting!!! Better than an airplane ride!

Leslie Bell
(Ftsp) - MLife

Locale: New York
Cold tolerance on 10/09/2009 21:39:45 MDT Print View

Actually, I'm from Texas. I've only been in NY for 6 years. I am really not fond of winter, but I'm not THAT cold intolerent. I might even consider trying snowshoeing this year (we'll see-- it is easy to say that now sitting here in my warm apartment).

Hart -
(backpackerchick) - MLife

Locale: Planet Earth
Snow shoeing! on 10/09/2009 21:55:50 MDT Print View

Good for you. First time I tried, I rented some and asked the guy how to do it. He looked at me like I was crazy and said "it's just 4 wheel drive for your feet"! I use sticks (poles). Except you can step on your other shoe which has interesting consequences. It's fun!

This is an area where a lot women specific items are emerging. Women's snow shoes are designed to fit a smaller shoe (not real small -- there's only one size so they will fit about all women). The men's were often impossible to get the binding snug enough around a women's sneaker type shoe. The ladies models tend to have a lower profile. Basically, there is less shoe on the inside so it's harder to step on your other foot.

Good fun. Nothing to it. Makes you walk a little funny that's all. Even if you aren't a fan of walking with sticks, they will really help with snowshoeing where everyone's a bit klutzier.

Kimberly Wersal
(kwersal) - MLife

Locale: Western Colorado
Re: Growing belly? on 10/09/2009 22:27:37 MDT Print View

I'm thinking the same thing! Have I REALLY not been paying attention? Well, congrats! But all that hard work you had done getting trim and honed! Not that it is a wasted effort, but, just saying...