Insul Bright in a Quilt
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Gregg Martell
(gmartell) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Insul Bright in a Quilt on 09/29/2009 16:52:23 MDT Print View

Has anyone tried using Insul Bright in a quilt? First question is it breathable enough for a quilt. Seems I read somewhere that it was, but can no longer find the reference. While I realize there is not r-rating associated with it - alone it might make a pretty good summer quilt. I wonder what kind of temperature rating a quilt made of 2.5 oz XP and a layer of Insul Bright would be?

Jason Klass
(jasonklass) - F

Locale: Parker, CO
Quilt on 09/29/2009 21:40:02 MDT Print View

It doesn't seem to compress very well. Don't you think it might turn out kind of bulky?

Gregg Martell
(gmartell) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Will have to check on 09/29/2009 22:06:41 MDT Print View

Good point - I hadn't really thought about how well it would compress. I think my wife has a yard of it laying around here someplace. If I can find it, I can see how small that will compress and guestimate how much volume a quilt of just Insul Bright would take.

One thing you wouldn't have to worry about is loft retention, since the insulating value is in the reflectivity. It could be compressed hard and not loose any thermal efficency.

Thanks

Ted DeWeese
(Tedinski) - F

Locale: Suburbs outside of the Sticks
How'd it go? on 11/13/2009 08:33:22 MST Print View

How'd it all work out?

I've been looking at Insul-Bright as the inside layer for a bottom-quilt for a camping hammock.

Did you ever find specifications on the material? Did it breathe as well as you expected?


Thanks!!!
Tedinski

Gregg Martell
(gmartell) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Never got around to it on 11/13/2009 11:21:19 MST Print View

Ted -

This was just one of those projects that I never really got around to. Still want to try it though. I see that you have another thread going that interesting.

Gregg

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Never got around to it on 11/13/2009 12:49:32 MST Print View

While the material is breathable, do realize that it isn't super breathable - its center core is mylar after all. It is good at doing what it does...but add in a large human all night and you may well over do it with sweating and just simple night time perspiring.

Gregg Martell
(gmartell) - F

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Moisture transport on 11/13/2009 14:28:35 MST Print View

That is a concern. I've done "survival weekends" with scouts using only a mylar blanket down to freezeing. It works, but I was soaked due trapped moisture. Since Insul Bright is "punctured" mylar, I was thinking it might have more breathability. If it isn't, it would kill the quilt idea.

Ted DeWeese
(Tedinski) - F

Locale: Suburbs outside of the Sticks
Re: Moisture transport on 11/13/2009 15:01:02 MST Print View

:)

I remember those days!
I taught wilderness survival up in the ADK's for a summer... but we didn't bring any mylar blankets. I have used them in the past, when a whole load of gear got absolutely soaked in 33F water, middle of winter! It was the coldest night I've ever spent, but I must admit that I DID wake up in the morning. ;)

I think I'll experiment by using a thin quilt (the kind for sitting in the living-room!) surrounded by a layer of the Insul-Bright. In the other thread, it was mentioned that the Insul-Bright should be kept around 3/4" from body heat...

It should be pretty obvious if the Insul-Bright makes a big difference.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Moisture transport on 11/13/2009 19:10:16 MST Print View

Here is a pretty funny story a customer told me (who posts here as well!) ;-)

She has a friend from the East who came out to hike with them in early season. Someone did NOT bring a hat and is of the lesser haired type. They ended up wearing the custom FBC UL steamer bag sized cozy as a hat during the night.

Their head stayed quite toasty.

lol.....