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Derek Cox
(derekcox) - F

Locale: Southeast
Re: Pillows on 09/15/2009 23:28:20 MDT Print View

Dual flexair with a piece of foam padding on top (like from a mattress cover type foam. Super light and just as comfortable as the pillow i use in bed each night. less than 3 ounces. you can make a pillow case or put it in a t-shirt if you want as well.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
flex-air on 09/16/2009 07:22:47 MDT Print View

I was a little skeptical of the Flex-air, but for the $ I'd figured I wouldn't be out much if I didn't like. Well to my surprise (and my wife's) they are quite comfoy- we're using the large single chamber ones- 0.8 w/ straw (straw doubles as an emergency water gatherer :)) it also takes up no room (deflate it flat, fold and put in a ziplock w/ the straw)

the thing is turning out to be quite durable as well- four 3-4 day trips and it stills looks like new

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Pillows on 09/16/2009 10:29:48 MDT Print View

I use the Exped Pillow Pump. Since it has foam inside it has more substance than just an air pillow. I blow it up just a bit to get the firmness and height I need (side sleeper). I also use it to fill my pad so wild things don't grow inside if I was using my own warm, moist air. It does weight 5.5 oz though - one of my luxury items.

Simon Wurster
(Einstein) - F

Locale: Big Apple
Re: Re: Pillows on 09/16/2009 11:05:33 MDT Print View

I've tried:
-Big Agnes Pillow
-REI Travel Pillow (self inflater, bow-tie shaped)
-Horshoe shaped inflatable pillow.
-Sea-to-Summit luxury pillow (2 parts, self-inflating core + soft cover).
-Cocoon Down Pillow

I've matched these with:
-Z-lite sitpad folded in half
-Therm-a-Rest sitpad (orange) folded in half.
-Open-cell foam, one 2" thick with holes for peaches, another about 1" thick. I really wanted this to work as DIY project.
...and various combinations thereof (about 6, IIRC). They were either too wobbly because of the air chambers (no matter how flat I made them), or too hard, or too thick, or too hot, or too slippery, or too bulky, or too fragile, or...

But there was a winner: the Sea-to-Summit self-inflating core (4.9 oz.) with the Cocoon on top (3.0 oz.) (held together with a fabic ribbon). The Cocoon made all the combinations work very well, the hard part was finding a foundation that was height-adjustable, didn't flatten-out, wasn't wobbly, was durable, and easy-to-use. Yup, startling at 8 oz., but this pillow and my BA AC pad aren't luxuries, they're necessities...

Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
MB Pillow works for me on 09/16/2009 11:17:18 MDT Print View

I use the MB pillow along with their UL 90 (35" long) inflatable pad and have been quite happy with this combination --- particularly the way they toggle together.

Just ordered a Neo-Air for my wife, but given the weight and added thickness I'm tempted to try it out (since I'll have hers to play with a bit ...). With the Neo-Air (size regular, 72") the pillow would sit on top of the pad rather than at the end of the pad, so I guess I'd have to stuff it inside my sleeping bag hood on cold nights. But what about warm nights? Maybe it would stay in place by itself well enough ... dunno. Overall, I like that pillow, however.

Darren McClintock
(Darren) - MLife
Pillows on 09/16/2009 12:43:45 MDT Print View

I use the Big Agnes Clearview pillow. Same thing as the Clearview pad. Right at 3 ounces and packs down to about the size of a ziplock bag with a valve on it. I haven't tried to use anything else since getting it.

Dondo .
(Dondo) - F

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: MB Pillow works for me on 09/16/2009 17:29:59 MDT Print View

With the Neo-Air (size regular, 72") the pillow would sit on top of the pad rather than at the end of the pad, so I guess I'd have to stuff it inside my sleeping bag hood on cold nights. But what about warm nights? Maybe it would stay in place by itself well enough ... dunno. Overall, I like that pillow, however.

On a trip last week, I spent three nights with a NeoAir and Montbell pillow. To hold them together, I just added a thin piece of shockcord tied to the holes in the pillow and stretched it around the NeoAir at about the sixth groove from the top. It worked well.

Laurence Beck
(beckla) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Thermarest stuff sack on 09/25/2009 16:50:07 MDT Print View

A thermarest stuff sack is fleece lined. Turn it outside, stuff in your down jacket or some other clothes and it makes a great pillow.

Steve Parr
(srparr) - F

Locale: SE Michigan
Re: Thermarest stuff sack on 09/25/2009 17:37:27 MDT Print View

> A thermarest stuff sack is fleece lined. Turn it outside,
> stuff in your down jacket or some other clothes and it
> makes a great pillow.

I use this stuff sack, but don't have enough extra clothing to stuff into it for a good pillow ... especially if I need to wear some to bed for extra warmth.

My last trip I brought an REI self-inflating sitpad, and used it inflated in the thermarest stuff sack, along with some minimal clothes, stuff sacks, etc. That worked pretty well, and the sitpad doubled as a comfy seat in camp!

I have heard that the MSR Dromlite water bladder I use can double as pillow ... I believe I'll test it out as "stuffing" next trip.

Edited by srparr on 09/25/2009 17:38:29 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Thermarest stuff sack on 09/25/2009 18:42:01 MDT Print View

"A thermarest stuff sack is fleece lined."

Which therm-a-rest stuff sack? I have 3 at home (NeoAir, Prolite 3, older Ultralight) and none of them are fleece lined.

Edited by dandydan on 09/25/2009 18:42:38 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Re: Pillows on 09/25/2009 18:45:41 MDT Print View

A roll-top dry bag, same one you used for your sleeping bag and/or clothes, works sorta well...

Yup a roll top dry bag is a great way to go. I use a 7 litre roll top dry bag from MEC that weighs 40g (1.5oz). This keeps my down quilt dry and it serves very well as a pillow too. Roll top sacks work much better than cinch top sacks because you can roll it up to the desired volume to get the loft you need. With a traditional sack I normally don't have enough clothes to fill it solidly, so the clothes end up parting in the night and my head winds up on the mattress.

Another nice thing with the dry sack is that even if you don't have any clothes to stuff it with, you can always just use air. This is less comfortable but it works. Be warned though that the really ultralight dry sacks have a hard time maintaining a seal when they are just filled with air and your 10 lbs head is laying on it. My 1.5oz dry sack has a floppy roll top and it slowly leaks with my head on it. I have a 2.5oz dry sack that has a more solid roll top (ie. stiffer fabric strip across the top) and that seals well. One pin hole and you're done though....

Edited by dandydan on 09/25/2009 18:49:35 MDT.

Steve Parr
(srparr) - F

Locale: SE Michigan
Re: Re: Thermarest stuff sack on 09/25/2009 19:13:03 MDT Print View

> Which therm-a-rest stuff sack? I have 3 at home
> (NeoAir, Prolite 3, older Ultralight) and none of
> them are fleece lined.

Not all their sacks are fleece lined, but Therm-a-rest does makes two lined sacks: small (2 oz) and large (2.6). You can see them on their site or go to REI's site and search for "thermarest pillow sack".

I have the large, and it is large enough to hold my regular size NeoAir, Montbell SS #3 sleeping bag, and silk bag liner. This makes for a nice bundle that does not super compress the down bag. There is even enough room I can squeeze in couple clothing items without too much problem.

I like to sleep comfortable in the back country!

Edited by srparr on 09/25/2009 19:16:00 MDT.

Siegmund Beimfohr
(SigBeimfohr) - M
Re: Thermarest stuff sack on 09/25/2009 19:33:18 MDT Print View

I have a small TR pillow stuff sack with the fleece lining. Although it would work for my Montbell bag, I use it to hold sleeping clothes (silk longjohn top and bottom, wool socks), and any extra cold-weather clothes.

As a pillow with fleece side out, I curl a TR sit pad inside around a Nalgene 48 oz cantene (filled with water and/or air) as the core. Works fine as a pillow for side sleeping. All double-use items.

Jeff Antig
(Antig)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Pillows on 09/25/2009 23:57:56 MDT Print View

I use a MontBell wrapped with a t-shirt. fairly comfy for a backpacking pillow.

Paul Gibson
(pgibson) - F

Locale: SW Idaho
Light pillows on 09/30/2009 10:31:26 MDT Print View

Hey guys, its been a wile since I posted much here, I got hooked on hammocks this summer and have been hanging out over at Hammock Forums a lot. One of the first things I ran into with my hammock and ultralight was that I wanted a pillow but I did not have enough extra clothes for stuffing in a stuff sack, and I just do not find that very comfortable any way. So I started making some small pillows, and then some larger ones. From there things have started to grow and I started a little company to make and sell some gear. I am offering a couple versions of my pillows the smaller one in 1.1 oz ripstop weighs in at just 3 oz and the big one a 5. check out my site at http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/

I have tried using my pillows on the ground a bit and they are just a comfortable there as in the hammock.

Paul

Edited by pgibson on 09/30/2009 11:16:07 MDT.