Moisture In Lens
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Tom Caldwell
(Coldspring) - F

Locale: Ozarks
Moisture In Lens on 08/30/2009 20:05:57 MDT Print View

I have a Nikon Coolpix, not a serious camera, but I use it to record the moment. My lens has fogged with a very fine mist of moisture. All pictures look like they are taken in heavy fog. Should I just throw it in my pile of old electronics, or is there something I can do about it?

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Moisture In Lens on 08/30/2009 21:37:35 MDT Print View

Hi Tom,

If it's simple water moisture it should clear up with just keeping the camera in a warm dry place for awhile. If it's something else, like chemical fogging (from electronics, lubricant, etc.) then there's probably little you can do short of an expensive cleaning (seldom worth if with a compact digicam).

Another possibility is fungus from longterm moisture fogging. If that's the case the lens is kaput.

Can you actually see it in the lens, or just in the pictures themselves?

Good luck!

Rick

Tom Caldwell
(Coldspring) - F

Locale: Ozarks
Moisture In Lens on 08/30/2009 21:46:28 MDT Print View

Oh, you can definitely see it in the lens. I'm warming it under a lightbulb and the "fog" is gone, but it still looks like there are some leftover spots inside the lens.

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Moisture In Lens on 08/30/2009 21:49:01 MDT Print View

Hi Tom,

That's not so bad. Minor spotting shouldn't affect image quality much. Of course the proof's in the pics.

Cheers,

Rick

Joe Clement
(skinewmexico) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Moisture In Lens on 08/31/2009 10:39:22 MDT Print View

I've had great luck with electronics (phones and such) baking them, in the oven at about 170. I usually let the oven it the lowest temp, and turn it off, then turn it back on in an hour. Take out the batteries first. Saved a few cell phones that went swimming like that.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Moisture In Lens on 08/31/2009 15:49:25 MDT Print View

I just use a hair dryer, gently blowing the hot air around the camera, making sure not to let the camera get hot. Usually takes about 15 minutes to evaporate the moisture inside.