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Suggestions for an overnighter near Seattle?
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Eric Fredricksen
(efredricksen) - MLife

Locale: Silicon Valley
Suggestions for an overnighter near Seattle? on 06/26/2009 23:05:00 MDT Print View

I'm looking to work in an overnighter next week in the Seattle area. I don't really know what's around, or in season, backpacking-wise, so I'm hoping for suggestions. I did Buckhorn Wilderness last year, but that was later in the summer.

Just trying to get away from the kids and everyone else, test out the new gear list, see some beauty, find some quiet, etc, without getting lost on snow-covered trails.

Anyone have a good idea for me? Thanks in advance.

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
book recommendation on 06/27/2009 05:35:58 MDT Print View

I lived in Tacoma, so I can expound all day on Rainier hikes, but that might be further than you want.

I can, however, recommend a great book. "75 Scrambles in Washington," Peggy Goldman. Supposedly it covers hikes that fall somewhere between trail hiking and mountaineering, but I have found that they really just tend to be challenging or off-trail hikes with occasional need for use of hands in a few of them.

It was my bible when I lived there. Best guidebook I have ever owned, hands down. Not because the write-ups about the hikes were particularly exceptional but rather because it didn't assume that the reader is an idiot who can't read a map, whereas most other guidebooks stick to pretty tame/lame hikes.

I hear that there's an Oregon version now, too.

Edited by acrosome on 06/27/2009 05:37:28 MDT.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Seattle area website recommendations on 06/27/2009 09:30:47 MDT Print View

http://www.nwhikers.net/
http://www.wta.org/

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Suggestions for an overnighter near Seattle? on 06/27/2009 21:24:06 MDT Print View

Eric,
You might consider either Mason Lake or Pratt Lake along the I-90 corridor. Both are readily accessible for an overnighter and low enough that you should not encounter too much snow. If you're interested, Google 'em up for directions and check with the Ranger Station in North Bend for the latest conditions. If you are going later than next Monday(6/29) PM me and I'll give you an in person report on conditions at Pratt Lake, as I'm going in there on a day hike next Monday. It's a 12 mile round trip and a mellow hike in to a very pretty lake.

Eric Fredricksen
(efredricksen) - MLife

Locale: Silicon Valley
Thanks! on 06/28/2009 14:31:45 MDT Print View

Thanks, folks for the recommendations, specific and general. The book sounds good - apparently out of print but I have a used one on the way.

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
Re: Thanks! on 06/28/2009 14:53:27 MDT Print View

No problem. In the book I'll further recommend two shorter hikes, though they are south of you:

1. Climb Mount Adams. The South Spur route is a straightforward non-technical climb best done as an overnighter with camp at 9000 feet, and bag the peak the next day. No mountaineering experience needed, though crampons and an ice axe are. Like all Cascade volcanoes it towers above the surrounding terrain and the view can't be beat.

2. The Tatoosh range traverse. You can bag seven peaks in the Tatoosh range just south of Paradise in Rainier NP, in 12 hours- one very long day. It's one-way from Reflection Lakes to Longmire, so leave your car in Longmire and hitch (easy). Scrambling, no climbing, though Lane Peak comes very close to being climbing. Mountain goats keep you company- I've seen one there every time I've been there.

Later,

Dean

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Thanks! on 06/28/2009 17:30:16 MDT Print View

" The Tatoosh range traverse. You can bag seven peaks in the Tatoosh range just south of Paradise in Rainier NP, in 12 hours- one very long day."

A word of caution on the Tatoosh at this point in time. I've been down on Rainier 4 times in the last 7 weeks, carrying water up to Camp Muir. The hike from Paradise up to Camp Muir offers a grand view of the Tatoosh to go with the blood, sweat, and tears. Be aware that there was above normal snowfall down there this year and the entire Tatoosh Range is still very much snowed in. You could probably find a protected spot to snow camp,
but there is no way you will get very far on the traverse. It's still way too much of a slog. You could, however, do an overnight snow camping trip if you have snowshoes. It is drop dead beautiful down there these days, but be prepared to work very hard. Also, be sure to check with the rangers on the latest avalanche conditions. 2 weeks ago, the entire north side of the range had extreme avalanche danger. It has been cool with occasional snow since then,so there is a chance some of the slopes will still be unstable.

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
Re: Re: Re: Thanks! on 06/28/2009 23:28:10 MDT Print View

Yes, those are both very much hikes for high summer. I should have made that clear.