Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
Upside down pack
Display Avatars Sort By:
Max Hoagland
(maxhoagland) - F
Upside down pack on 06/05/2009 19:43:34 MDT Print View

So I have been planning my next backpack, which will probably be a simple silnylon, roughly 30 Liters pack, when I got a crazy idea. Has anyone tried an upsidedown pack?

When I pack my backpack, I put my sleeping bag, tarp, and jackets all at the bottom and the stuff I need throughout the day while I'm hiking, food and water at the top, near the opening. However, this leads to an imbalanced pack with improper weight distribution. I thought, if the pack was upside down, so that the opening is at the bottom, it would correct this, making the light stuff on top and the heavy stuff at the bottom of the pack (when you're wearing it).

Other than the problem of stuff falling out of the pack (which seems easily corrected with a tight closure system) does anyone see any problems with this design? Obviously I don't want to commit to making a crappy pack.

Thanks for the input.

Steven Evans
(Steve_Evans) - MLife

Locale: Canada
Re: Upside down pack on 06/05/2009 20:11:24 MDT Print View

I say make it...just because it probably hasn't been done before. But, it sounds like a panel loader would solve your problems.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Upside down pack on 06/05/2009 22:34:09 MDT Print View

i am very intrigued by this idea. Make it a roll top closure and instead of rolling it toward the front of the pack roll it toward your back. This will keep the pack very weather proof and keep the closure secure.

You could also make the pack a panel loader and instead of the pack being upside down you could just pack it the way you like.

-Tim

Thom Darrah
(thomdarrah) - MLife

Locale: Southern Oregon
Upside down pack on 06/06/2009 07:15:55 MDT Print View

Tim,
Use a panel load style but instead opening folding downward for access have it open/fold upward. The zippered panel would look like a U, with the zipper pulls positioned upward when the pack is open. One could still incorporate a front mesh pocket by having it sewn inbound of the zipper track.

This would still allow for a fixed bottom panel which I feel is critical to the packs structural integrity and strength under load.

Edited by thomdarrah on 06/06/2009 07:39:26 MDT.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Upside down pack on 06/07/2009 15:57:12 MDT Print View

a pack like the SMD traveler (i think thats it) could be pack this way as is. Thats all i was saying.

-Tim

Rick Cheehy
(kilgoretrout2317) - F

Locale: Virginia
Re: Re: Upside down pack on 06/07/2009 17:56:28 MDT Print View

Big external pockets might solve the prob.

Nathan Auck
(auckjam) - MLife

Locale: Wasatch
Upside down pack on 06/08/2009 15:57:27 MDT Print View

That sounds like an interesting idea Max! You must have had an innovative teacher! Make sure to include some pockets for items you'll want to access throughout the day and without having to take your pack off. Remember though, many people pack with sleeping bag in bottom to get the bulk of the weight of the pack higher and closer to their upper back (the area within the backpack that carries most efficiently in many people's minds). Are you going to include a hipbelt? I've definitely found that a hipbelt makes a huge difference in load control, regardless of wear in the pack you put the bulk of its weight. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

Edited by auckjam on 06/08/2009 15:58:07 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Upside down pack on 06/08/2009 16:09:30 MDT Print View

> I put my sleeping bag, tarp, and jackets all at the bottom and the stuff I need throughout
> the day while I'm hiking, food and water at the top, near the opening. However, this
> leads to an imbalanced pack

With the exception of the tent, that is what I do too. However, I think it gives the *right* weight distribution: the light stuff at the bottom and the heavy stuff higher up. That makes for better load transfer and better balance.

Tent - just how do you get a wet tent at the bottom of your pack in the pouring rain? Strange idea. My tent goes on the top of my pack *outside* the waterproof section. Sure, I have to remove it when I stop for a meal - so what? I have to do a lot more unpacking than that to get my lunch out!

Cheers

Rick Cheehy
(kilgoretrout2317) - F

Locale: Virginia
Re: Re: Upside down pack on 06/08/2009 18:20:55 MDT Print View

A zipper opening, like a sleeping bag compartment on a conventional pack, might do the trick. Open at both ends. Or maybe velcro bottom roll top lid...Keep us up to date, this sounds cool.

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
"Upside down pack" on 06/09/2009 09:41:09 MDT Print View

Hmmm, what if you just packed your pack the way you want it packed? Am I missing something? Just curious. Ali