Stuffing Synthetic Insulation
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Matthew Bishop
(mattsbishop) - F - M

Locale: Northern Frontrange, Colorado
Stuffing Synthetic Insulation on 04/27/2009 12:35:19 MDT Print View

Maybe I'm not searching well enough, but I'm having trouble finding guidelines on how much one can safely compress synthetic insulation. The most I've seen is "use the manufacturer's stuff sack" which doesn't help when I'm the manufacturer.

Any ideas? I'd like this quilt I'm making with Climashield XP to withstand 5 years or more of occasional use without substantial degradation. Is there some level of compression that will do that? 50% of fully-lofted volume? 25%? As much as you can cram in a silnylon stuff (not compression) sack without bursting the seams?

Joe Kuster
(slacklinejoe) - MLife

Locale: Flatirons
Stuffing Synthetic Insulation on 04/27/2009 12:43:20 MDT Print View

There isn't a set compression amount for synthetics. It depends on the type of synthetic, how long it'll be stuffed and what your personal trade offs are on volume of item in pack vs expected life of item.

Subjective and probably useless to tell you, but personally, I stuff it by feel and go from there. It should never feel hard, instead a bit firm and stop there.

Matthew Bishop
(mattsbishop) - F - M

Locale: Northern Frontrange, Colorado
Re: Stuffing Synthetic Insulation on 04/27/2009 13:11:18 MDT Print View

Subjective but a place to start. I have -zero- experience with synthetics and anything will help. I should also mention that I'm looking for the on-trail just-in-pack stuff sack size; I'd store the quilt fully lofted.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Stuffing Synthetic Insulation on 04/27/2009 17:13:18 MDT Print View

Light synthetic fills don't usually last for more than a couple of years according to many reports. Stuffing them to any significant compression does reduce their loft quickly. Stuffing very lightly is important.

Cheers