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5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel?
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Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 04/24/2009 21:44:34 MDT Print View

Okay, so since I'm back in Washington now I need to get another fly rod, since my 2 piece was stolen while I was in Arizona. This time I want to get a packable rod for hiking and fishing, since that's what I enjoy anyhow.

I haven't been fly fishing in nearly 5 years, so I need practice. But I'm trying to decide whether I should buy the Cabela's 7 piece or the 5 piece 6wt rod or full setup for river fishing and some lakes up in the high country. Any suggestions on Reels for backpacking with? or just get a cabela's combo already setup? Any suggestions on a lightweight case for carrying the rod? I know BPL used to sell one years ago... but is there anywhere to source one or any suggestions?

Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
re: 5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 04/24/2009 22:49:31 MDT Print View

also, 8' 6" rod or 9' I'll be mainly fishing medium size rivers, and larger lakes. 5 to 6 wt., still haven't decided on the three forks reel or the prestige reel after I decide which combo to get.

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
Rod on 04/28/2009 07:48:53 MDT Print View

Hmmm, trout?

I would say 8.5' 5 weight...The fewest number of pieces that you can carry with ease. The less sections, the better the rod should cast. (1-piece would be ideal but kinda hard to pack)

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: 5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 04/28/2009 09:22:00 MDT Print View

Jared, most of the high lake in Washington have a lot of brush around the banks so it makes for a difficult back cast. A raft or float tube is a good way to get around the bush but at a heavy price penalty.
I use a 9 ft 4 wt 4pc., because its my favorite rod and I don't like casting anything shorter. If it is really windy I might move up to a 5 or 6 wt. (9ft of course). depending on the size of the river also dictates the rod wt.
For a lightweight rod tube- most less expensive rods come in a very light plastic tube that is perfect for a LW rod holder. I know Temple Fork Outfitter (TFO) rods come this way so stop by different fly shops and ask if they have any laying around that someone didn't want (they purchased a studier rod case).
I've used my plastic tube for 5 years now. If you get a tube for a 9' 4 pc. it will fit any rod that is 9' or smaller.

Jason Klass
(jasonklass) - F

Locale: Parker, CO
Re: 5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 05/03/2009 17:10:16 MDT Print View

Jared,
I use the 5-piece Cabela's Stowaway rods and think they pack down small enough (better price too). For reels, I use Old Orvis CFOs. I guess you don't need anything too fancy but I have tries Cabela's reels and wasn't impressed (I think their rods are much better than their reels). If you want a tube, you can use the clear, plastic tubes they they sell flourescent lights in. I normally don't use a tube--I just put the rod with it's rod bag in the side pocket of my pack and lash it down with the side compression strap. Hope that helps.

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
Light Tubes on 05/04/2009 09:59:54 MDT Print View

Ok...I keep hearing about these light tube protectors as super-light rod cases, so I went to HD this weekend and found the "Light protector" tubes. Excited, I picked one up to test it out...I think it would offer about as much protection as a rod bag. I mean, I was able to bend, twist, and crush the thing about as easy as a cardboard paper-towel roll. Is there another kind that I should be looking for?

Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 05/04/2009 10:37:55 MDT Print View

Well I've decided on the 5 piece. More than likely the 8' 6", it packs a little smaller and should cover a lot of the places I'll be fishing. Still torn on the reels, I've been looking at the cabelas RLS reels also, they may not be the lightest but I want a larger arbor, and be able to use it on a 2 piece rod later down the road (multi function) and be able to change out the spool for regular ol' fly fishing with a 2 piece and not break the bank. I'll head down to cabela's this weekend to look at some reels...

what is the issue with the cabela reels, drag? overall smoothness? function? thanks for all the help!

Michael Davis
(mad777) - F

Locale: South Florida
Re: 5 piece rod or 7 piece rod? lightweight holding case? Reel? on 05/04/2009 13:00:49 MDT Print View

Check out the following link for a detailed discussion of lightweight rod tube alternatives ....

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=12206

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
Thanks on 05/04/2009 13:52:49 MDT Print View

Thanks Michael, just what I needed!

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
Rod tube on 05/06/2009 16:19:03 MDT Print View

Go to Michael's craft store if they have them in your area. They sell a poster coloring kit complete with pens and a DIY poster. Give the poster kit away and keep the plastic tube that it comes in. The tube measures 30", weighs 5.8 oz and is perfect for a 9' 4 piece pack rod. Last time I bought one, I think the kit was about $8. To multi task, I slide the rod in a spare pair of sock before putting it in the tube. That will keep it from rattling and protect the rod.

Some of the lightest reels on the market are the basic click pawl type, like the Hardy's and Battenkill CFO's. You typically don't need a sophisticated drag for trout and if you do, then just use your finger against the spool as the fish takes line.

Since you are in WA, you might consider checking out the Washington Fly Fishing forum for basic info.

Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
Re: Rod tube on 05/06/2009 21:36:27 MDT Print View

there is a micheal's nearby I'll check them out and I found the washington fly fishers forum. thanks for the info. I'll check those reels out to, any reccomendations on some WF line?

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: Re: Rod tube on 05/06/2009 21:59:59 MDT Print View

I found a excellent LW rod tube at my local museum gift shop, it contained a map. The tube has held up to some fairly tough bushwacking.

Tony

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
WF line on 05/06/2009 22:05:59 MDT Print View

I'm in the market for a new line myself for my 5wt. I'm leaning toward a new Airflo. Not sure which one. I have one of their speylines and really like it. They make nice stuff. The Scientific Angler Sharkskin lines have created a quite a buzz. But they're pretty spendy at $100.

BTW, another good site for you if you don't know already is the NWhiker.net. Right in your backyard.

Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
Re: WF line on 05/06/2009 22:51:35 MDT Print View

Yeah, I post on the NWhikers forum from time to time. Mainly just a few trip reports and gear comments. I'm not a big fan of the WTA.

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
Stuff on 05/07/2009 07:43:14 MDT Print View

From what I understand Sharkskin is a great line for shooting line really far, but the exterior coating is so rough it can tear up your hands. Give me a Scientific Anglers WF Trout Taper any day and I'm happy.

I angree with Randall about the drag - Unless you are fishing for steelhead or heading out to the sea to fish you probably will never use a good drag. If get you caught in a sticky situation where you do need it, just use the rim of the spool carefully. (Make sure it's a rim-control or exposed rim reel for this) Most of the time you will never have to do this either, I play 99% of my fish with the line in the fingers of my left hand as the "Drag". I did think the CFO's were disc drags and not click-pawl, though.

Edited by Cloudveil9 on 05/07/2009 07:52:21 MDT.

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
click pawl on 05/07/2009 09:38:33 MDT Print View

CFO's are available in both a disc drag and click pawl. The click pawl would be my preference. They are just so classic and I would bet just a tad lighter. There is always a few floating around on ebay. Even if the reel does not allow rim control, you can apply light pressure with your finger to the rear of the reel to the spooled line itself as it goes out. JW Young reels are an English made click pawl reel and are a great value. I recently picked one up on ebay for $45. But they are not near as light as a CFO or Hardy and they are typically right hand wind only. Probably a good 2 oz heavier than a comparable CFO/Hardy.

I have also read that the Sharkskin line can make a weird noise as it shoots which many people have found annoying.

Jared....what is the WTA?

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
Reel on 05/07/2009 09:54:23 MDT Print View

Sorry Randall, I didn't know it came with either drag. If I ever break out of my Plfueger Medalist 1494RC habit maybe I'll find more out about these other reels ;)

Jared Cook
(rooinater) - F

Locale: Northwet
Re: click pawl on 05/07/2009 10:17:40 MDT Print View

wasington trails association, which nwhikers has a direct tie to. They appear to believe hiking is the only true outdoor sport and every other sport should be banned from the back country, which their policies strongly reflect. I don't believe that should be how backcountry management should be approached.

to keep this on topic I'll leave it at that, and please stay on topic. I know how people like to run with stuff they don't agree with.

Has anyone had experience with the waterworks ULA purist reels? 2.9oz larger arbor, click-pawl for 75 yds of backing of 5 wt line. might be a good all around reel for the trout fishing I would be doing.

I also found that they just put in a fly shop in gig harbor! i'll swing by there on the way home and pick their brains on some flies and their colors for the local waters.

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
ULA Purist on 05/07/2009 12:16:39 MDT Print View

I don't have any experience with them. From what I do know, they are good quality. I have found them to be very appealing for backpacking because of the amazingly low weights. For a trout rod, unless you are really catching big trout, a reel is just a glorified line holder anyway, so why not get the lightest one for backpacking. My only concern with them would be if (actually not if but when)I take my next fall, how it would hold up, as there are trade offs to everything.

Aaron Lastname
(Cloudveil9) - F
$$$ on 05/08/2009 08:18:27 MDT Print View

That's a pretty expensive line holder!