Quilt Advice
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JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Quilt Advice on 04/23/2009 15:38:52 MDT Print View

My latest quilt was constructed of a Ray Jardine kit.I originally was going to do the draftstopper/gorget but I decided against it in the end (which prompted the question from my wife, "why did you buy their kit then?"..) Instead I am considering using a 1.1 ripstop sheet to turn it into a "bag" if you will. There was someone on these boards who posted about doing it a few years ago.

My thought or reason for attempting this is largely due to my size (6'3" 265 pounds) If I make the quilt any bigger, it's going to be too big to get in my pack. I sleep on my side and turn alot.

I have also noted past discussions here about using straps which slip under the pad to help do the same thing, keep the quilt in place.

I also understand the drawstring concept but have never felt that was a valid approach for me since I sleep on my side.

If you were to construct a quilt and faced with similar dilemma, what would you do?

TIA.

James D Buch
(rocketman) - F

Locale: Midwest
Quilt/Bag Modification on 04/24/2009 05:09:59 MDT Print View

When I built my Jardine quilt, I used both of the options. The quilt was a little big and I am only 5' 7" and 190 lbs. I felt that the volume of the quilt was a little higher than I had hoped, but it was managed OK on my external frame pack.

I can't imagine the quilt being much smaller, when packed, if I were to eliminate the wisp of lightweight fabric for the draft stopper. I don't remember the project well enough to estimate how much "volume" would be involved in the gorget modification either way.

Have you laid out the "sleeping bag" version on paper to see how much narrower it would be? I'm not sure how to estimate the packed volume changes from the design changes. A first guess would be to assume that the packed volume scales linearly with the area of the flattened quilt/bag.

JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Re: Quilt Advice on 04/24/2009 09:31:39 MDT Print View

James I should probably clarify a little.

The current quilt after being sewed wound up at 59 inches wide at the top. Using their kit there was no extra material to truly create the draft stopper so I purchased more material locally. After looking at the other two quilts I have previously sewn and thinking about this one and its intended use on a thru hike of the Long Trail this summer, I decided to sew it without those options because I was concerned I would wind up ripping the fabric after repeated use.

I think now that was an invalid excuse.

What I am wanting to do is use a 54X59 inch piece of fabric and sew it side to side to create the "bottom" which I would essentially slip into like a sleeping bag. The weight of the extra fabric in it's current size is 3.4 ounces. I wont be using but 60 % of the fabric to make the bottom so I'll essentially only be adding a couple of ounces. This wont affect pack volume.

The purpose of the bottom was to make it easier to keep the drafts out since I toss and turn alot. Being able to grab the extra bottom fabric and pull the sides closer.

I could conceivably make a wider quilt utilizing a center seam to expand the overall width but my concern with that obviously is that this increases the volume of space needed in the pack.

So, to make a long story short, I am looking for a way to help pull the quilt closer to my sides without the draft stopper method and am looking for advice on how to best accomplish that.

Best,

--Joe

john Tier
(Peter_pan) - M

Locale: Co-Owner Jacks 'R' Better, LLC, VA
Option to seal a quilt on 04/24/2009 09:49:15 MDT Print View

Joe,

Think of full length omni tape and a Down To Earth Pad Converter or OT on another pad of your preference.... No drafts.... No extra bottom.... It would be 1oz vs 3oz you are considering... add 1 oz OT for the pad and you are still ahead.

Remember I have a bias here.... but you asked for alternatives/comments.

pan

JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Re; I like Bias :) on 04/24/2009 11:50:41 MDT Print View

Jack,

I have no problems with bias or cottage gear makers offering suggestions to solve problems :)

So I wasn't aware of the tape or the pad converter until your post and I read up on both at your website.

First thing I noticed was the pad converter description mentions.. "Will convert any 48 inch quilt..." My quilt is 59 inches. How does that affect getting in and out of it?

--Joe

Frank Deland
(rambler) - M

Locale: On the AT in VA
draft stoppers on 04/27/2009 20:04:37 MDT Print View

The first Quilt (the blue one) was not wide enough. When on my side, the edges were up off the ground. So, I added a "floor" as you mentioned. But, it was not necessary, so I cut it just to leave the flaps. The flaps are just one layer of tapered nylon. The black quilt was originally flat all the way, but I since added the footbox to make it warmer.

In short, I would add the draft stoppers to the side. Slipping off the pad has not been a problem. I tried velcro straps on the first one, but found them not necessary.

http://good-times.webshots.com/album/561713820vwSrLL

JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Re: Draft Stoppers on 04/28/2009 06:33:34 MDT Print View

I appreciate your insight Frank. I spent about an hour last night dozing outside under my tarp in the late evening. Temps here were 35 and it was really breezy. The more I rolled around and tried to think how I react at night, the more I am inclined to agree with your assessment.

My original quilts were not wide enough either. This one definitely is wide enough but needs that extra bit to keep it tucked in tight. I suppose if I were a bivvy sleeper I wouldn't need to think about this ;)

Frank Deland
(rambler) - M

Locale: On the AT in VA
homemade quilt photos on 05/11/2009 15:37:58 MDT Print View

Came upon these photos of a homemade quilt:

http://www.practicalbackpacking.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=510

john Tier
(Peter_pan) - M

Locale: Co-Owner Jacks 'R' Better, LLC, VA
Huge Girth on 05/12/2009 14:24:53 MDT Print View

Joe,

It will add 18 inches to your 59 inch wide quilt, if modified with full length omni tape for a total girth of 77 inches....

FWIW, that is enough girth to seve as a winter overbag over most trim mummy bags....Also you can modify most any pad with omni tape using waterproof contact cement or barge cement.

That wiuld be very much like using a DTEPC with one of the JRB Large Family quilts, there is a picture of this witha Mt Rogers quilt over a Mountain Hardware Stormlite, long bag on our site.


Pan