Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
Dehydrating Questions
Display Avatars Sort By:
Derek Medlin
(dmedlin) - F

Locale: Southeast
Dehydrating Questions on 04/14/2009 10:14:56 MDT Print View

I have been loving my dehydrator, especially for fruits and veggies.

I have a couple of questions for those how are a bit more experienced:
1) Does anyone use a mandolin slicer? If so, which one? I think this would speed up the process greatly.

2)At what heat level do you dehydrate pastas, quinoa, etc? Degrees or Low/Med/High would be sufficient.

Thanks in advance!

Derek

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Stuff on 04/14/2009 13:01:26 MDT Print View

Sure, if you like using a mandolin, use one! Small and uniform cuts are your best bet for drying veggies.

As for temps, I dry most stuff at 135* if no meat or dairy is involved. If pasta or similar I check hourly to break up clumps as well.

Derek Medlin
(dmedlin) - F

Locale: Southeast
Cut it up on 04/14/2009 13:13:13 MDT Print View

Thanks Sarah --

My question about the mandolin was more around whether or not people find it useful/time saver. I have never used one, so I am trying to get some feedback before purchasing, especially since they seem to run from US$20-$160!

Also, you mentioned cutting veggies into small, uniform pieces - do you ever use a food processor/chopper to do this or does this make them too small? (thinking of broccoli stems, carrots, etc)

Thanks for the temp on pasta and the suggestion to check it regularly. Cheers!

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
Re: Dehydrating Questions on 04/14/2009 14:23:39 MDT Print View

Hi Derek,

Yes, I have a mandolin slicer. It was under $20 (from somewhere like Walmart) and works really well. I am about to replace it after 8 years of service. It does speed things up. I use it to julienne and slice.

I dry quinoa and pasta at 135ºF to 140ºF. Meats and seafood at 155ºF or 160ºF.

Derek Medlin
(dmedlin) - F

Locale: Southeast
Mandolin on 04/14/2009 14:26:09 MDT Print View

Cool - so they work.

I was just looking at one the other day that was under $20, right next to one that was $70... if you can make your cheap-o last for 8 years, then I should be fine with one too.

thanks!

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Mandolin on 04/14/2009 14:51:58 MDT Print View

Costco has a Mandolin for about $40. Be careful using one, I have seen some nasty accidents with them (I worked in the restaurant business for along time). Uniform cuts you will get with them too. Takes a little practice to get it down

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Food choppers on 04/14/2009 17:07:49 MDT Print View

Sure! I use both a mini chopper and a full size processor. Mandolins scare the bedoodles out of me personally ;-) The processor works so well, I have no reason to change either!

Jeremy Greene
(tippymcstagger) - F

Locale: North Texas
Re: Cut it up on 04/14/2009 18:17:18 MDT Print View

"My question about the mandolin was more around whether or not people find it useful/time saver."

I have one. It is probably a toss-up. It can help with large batches if drying or frying. I seldom use it for a meal, because it is more complex and takes up space on the dish rack.

I get pretty good results slicing with a vegetable peeler or a cheese grater. These aren't adjustable like the mandolin, but they aren't such an event.

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
mandolins on 04/14/2009 20:56:07 MDT Print View

Just be sure to use the guard... it's in the package for a reason. Common sense makes it a fairly safe addition to your kitchen. When it gets dull have the blade sharpened or replaced. Most issues in the kitchen happen with people using dull equipment.

One thing I do with all my knives and my mandolin and food processor blades... rinse and dry them immediately especially if you were slicing something acidic. It makes a big difference to the longevity of the sharp edge.

While I use a food processor and mini food pro - I really do prefer the mandolin. It's much easier to clean and if I am not doing a ton of slicing it's much less cumbersome. I also like that it doesn't use hydro. I find the non-electric mini-choppers somewhat useless.

Edited by Laurie_Ann on 04/14/2009 20:58:05 MDT.

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
dehydrating food on 06/01/2009 17:54:46 MDT Print View

Derek,

Recently I wrote an article at the request of the Washington Trails Association on Dehydrating Foods. You can read the pdf version here...

http://www.wildernesscooking.com/fork/making-trail-food.pdf

Sorry I didn't post it earlier.

Justin McMinn
(akajut) - F

Locale: Central Oklahoma
Sarah's Site on 06/02/2009 15:31:08 MDT Print View

Sarah may be too humble to to plug her own site, but it has answered so many of my questions, that I'm happy to pass it on.

Good place to start - http://www.trailcooking.com/dehydrating101