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Gabriel Pramuk
(gpramuk) - F

Locale: West
NB CDT list on 03/27/2009 22:45:26 MDT Print View

Hi there, long time reader, member, first time posting.

So. I'm heading north in about a month.
I have most of my gear figured out but I have a few questions.

Here's the list:
MLD revelation - 6

SMD gatewood cape - 11
(another once or two with guy lines and sealer)

SMD serenety net - 7

* undecided quilt - 20
(20 degreeish, 20 oz?)

GG 1/8"" pads - 4
(or similarly light combo, sit pad, hitch hiking sign)

** unworn clothes - 31

ground cloth and stakes - 4

water, pb jar, spoon, bags - 6
no cook - sawyer**** might end up weighing more!

*** gear - 12

maps compas pen magnifier - 3

104 oz

6 lbs 8 oz total
6,10 without poles (tent pole)
7,3 with ice axe - short raven pro ( already have it, not dropping bucks on a ULA.
7,5 lbs with tent pole - without trekking poles, with ax
Uhh too many combos to think about...

With 4 days food and 4 l water
22,8
22,10
23,3
23,5


*** Gear
light <1
knife <1
first aid 2
rash stuff, tape, bandaids, needle, floss
toiletries 2
toothbrush, Dr. B, purell
camera 4
tape <1
bear cord 1
bug net <1 oz
total 12


**clothes worn:
pants 8
shirt 8
sun hat 2
socks 2
shoes 25-30ish?
bandana 1
shades 1

total 50ish


**carried
thermals 5
shorts 3
down jacket 8
balaklava 2
socks 3
raincoat 6
short sleeve shirt 4
total 31
Maybe an extra layer for the San Juans


Items caried:
knife, compas, light on lanyard
day's maps, camera, bandana, a couple snack bars

10 ozish?
makes pack weight:

base excluding stuff carried
6,2
6,4
6,13
6,15

loaded
21,14
22,0
22,11
22,13

max skin out with trekking poles

28 lbs - I think, forgive lazy calculations

min skin out
no poles
9,12

min skin out with poles
10,12
I am pretty well decided on the pack, cape and net. I already dropped the bucks.
I like an enclosed net. Ants really like crawling in my bag...

* Quilts: I was looking at Jacks are Better - Hood River, Golite Ultra 20.
I am a fairly warm sleeper but I know it gets pretty cold on the CDT. I had a Mountain Hardwear Phantom 32 for most of the PCT and didn't zip it up at all past SoCal and only a couple times was I cold, but always managed to get a good rest, even if I woke a few times.

**I have a down jacket but was wondering if there are any other options that I might be able to wear with my pack. Light fleece, something I could use as a sleeping layer and hiking. I like that MYOG fleece thing recently posted. I only really used my down jacket when sleeping and at camps and in towns, never while hiking, I don't wanna smash the down, heh. I had a marmot windshirt on the PCT but when it rained, it wasn't that great, I'll likely use my dryducks as a windbreaker.

Any input on my clothes? Multi-use, light, lightning proof...

**** I know the Sawyer thing is a can of worms, I was thinking of gravity, but you have to backflush... I've read some posts. Anyone hooked up a squeezevavle thing like on a gas tank for compression? and flushing water after purifying?

So.
Am I missing anything?
Ideas on a quilt, multiuse warm top.


Cheers
Gabe

Edited by gpramuk on 03/28/2009 00:36:06 MDT.

Michael Fogarty
(mfog1) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Nunatak on 03/28/2009 06:34:24 MDT Print View

If I were to purchase another quilt, I'd go with the Nunatak Arc Alpinist in Black Epic fabric. (20 deg. quilt) Possibly with 2oz of overfill as well?

I'd guess that you could go with the Arc Specialst too, in the same fabric and with overfill, and be a tad lighter with the weight.

Diplomatic Mike
(MikefaeDundee)

Locale: Under a bush in Scotland
Re : Nunatak on 03/28/2009 06:53:57 MDT Print View

I'll second the Nunatak. I have the Arc Specialist in Black Epic, no overfill, and have been comfortable around 20F with my hooded Skaha Plus down sweater. The Specialist is plenty wide enough for overlayering.

John Haley
(Quoddy) - F

Locale: New York/Vermont Border
Re: NB CDT list on 03/28/2009 08:42:27 MDT Print View

Unfortunately if you want a Nunatac quilt you won't have it within a month's time. The Nunatac is a great choice, though. I have an Arc Specialist in 0.8oz Pertex and 1oz overfill. Custom fit for 6'1" it weighs 17oz.

Zack Karas
(iwillchopyou@hotmail.com) - MLife

Locale: Lake Tahoe
CDT on 03/28/2009 09:45:20 MDT Print View

I don't know if you mentioned if you are thru-hiking or not, but if you are you may very well want more substantial pads for sleeping on. The CDT in CO is quite high and the San Juans have had a great snow year.

Also, I don't know your average mileage, but there are some longer stretches in Montana without resupply (I'm thinking Benchmark Ranch to East Glacier, the others are escaping me). Just make sure that your pack is big enough--but I'm sure you've thought everything out at it will be fine. Have a great time on the Commonly Disappearing Trail!

Gabriel Pramuk
(gpramuk) - F

Locale: West
Uhh quilts, sleeping pads, yes its a thru hike... on 03/28/2009 10:46:42 MDT Print View

Thanks for the "Commentary / Insight"

I had the Golite jam2 for the PCT, carried a bag, a Tarptent, in my pack, and had plenty of room for 5 days of food.

And yes! Its is a thru hike, and I do plan on moving pretty quick, especially once I reach WY, That will be at least two months on the trail to get in shape. I think I can work up to a pretty good clip if I don't get lost! haha.

Benchmark to East Glacier is 130 miles, may need 5 days of food.

If I go from Chief Joseph Pass to Butte, thats 150, yikes!
Bannock Pass to Chief Joseph is 120.

The basin is 120
but I will likely get up to some pretty long days there.
I've heard that 30s + wouldn't be out of the question there.

that 150 is the only one of concern. Hopefully it doesn't have long waterless stretches, I have't seen those maps yet

Also, Doc Campbels to Pie Town - 125 may be going slower, but won't have the wicked hunger yet, I hope. I din't get that til El Cajon Pass on the PCT.

Quilts, I really do like those Nunatak ones! I could order it and get it intime for CO, And thanks for the tip on the San Juans, I'll have my thick ridgerest sent there or something. Maybe even a bag liner. I haven't completely ruled out the Creede rout, but if the snow looks too scary, I could do that. I did enter the Sierras May 31 last year in kinda low snow year.

So how bout my warm layer, something more multi use than a down jacket?

Edited by gpramuk on 03/28/2009 10:48:23 MDT.

Zack Karas
(iwillchopyou@hotmail.com) - MLife

Locale: Lake Tahoe
Cdt on 03/28/2009 14:26:04 MDT Print View

The warmest piece of gear I had on the CDT was a MB Down Inner Jacket and I never felt the need for anything warmer. The most I ever hiked in was my L/S hiking shirt and either a windshirt or rainjacket (though I was never more than warm in CO). You should be fine.