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Paul Sturrock
(Byblow) - F
What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 11:22:47 MST Print View

I have an REI Sub Kilo sleeping bag that weighs about 2 lb. I'm thinking about getting a lighter weight quilt for summer camping in the Rockies and Grand Tetons (my traditional haunts).

I have a decent collection of clothing to extend a quilt's range, including a Capilene 3 thermal top and bottom, Micro Puff jacket and pants, fleece jacket and pants, Patagonia Houdini, and socks, gloves and a wool cap.

I use a Tarptent Contrail and I also carry a poncho, which I could drape over a quilt for extra warmth.

I wouldn't carry all the clothes listed above; only what I need to complement a quilt. Also, a quilt that can double as a top cover for my sleeping bag would be nice.

Any help you can give me is appreciated!

John Haley
(Quoddy) - F

Locale: New York/Vermont Border
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 11:45:08 MST Print View

Since you're talking about the mountains in summer you probably want to go with a quilt that will keep you warm to 30F to 35F at night. I went with a Nunatak Arc Specialist (16 to 17oz).
http://www.nunatakusa.com/site07/arc_products/arc_specialist.htm

A less expensive choice is a Jack's R Better No Sniveller (21 to 23oz).
http://www.jacksrbetter.com/Wearable%20Quilts.htm

Once you lay under the comfort and temperature adaptability of a quilt you'll probably wonder why you didn't try it sooner. I know I did, and ended up selling the four sleeping bags I had.

Edited by Quoddy on 03/03/2009 13:32:33 MST.

Dave T
(DaveT) - F
caribou mf. on 03/02/2009 13:31:43 MST Print View

well, it's not a quilt per se, but the WM Caribou MF is a 35 sleeping bag with a full zipper. it's 20 oz in the 6' length. 3/4 pound lighter than your current bag! and i've heard from a few people that the sub-kilo temp rating is "optimistic."

zip it up with some other clothes on and go to freezing. unzip it and lay under it to use it in any summertime conditions. i am a HUGE fan of this bag.

(i still don't understand the quilt deal, and probably never will, unless you are talking full summer-time hiking). YMMV.)

cheers!

Edited by DaveT on 03/02/2009 13:33:56 MST.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: caribou mf. on 03/02/2009 13:47:55 MST Print View

(i still don't understand the quilt deal, and probably never will, unless you are talking full summer-time hiking). YMMV.)

I gotta ask ... have you tried it?

I didn't understand it either ... but had a bag that was too snug and tried it as a quilt in not so cold temps, then cooler, then cooler ... finally at temps slightly below the bag's rated temp (marmot's bag ratings tend to be pretty accurate). Then I switched to "real" quilts and I have quilted comfortably as cold as 0*F (in a bivy under a 5x8 tarp)

I also didn't understand tarps ... but tried them anyway. Ditto with trail runners vs bomber boots, frameless packs, going without duplicate clothing, trekking poles.

It IS all a YMMV thing but I'm extremely glad I took the chance to find out how much "mileage" I got from ideas that I initially doubted.

Edited by jcolten on 03/02/2009 13:49:23 MST.

Jolly Green Giant
(regultr) - MLife

Locale: www.jolly-green-giant.blogspot.com
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 14:59:15 MST Print View

To bridge others comments, I took out the zipper and added two elastic straps.....and use my WM Caribou MF into the 30's as a quilt quite comfortably. It is a ridiculous bargain considering the weight and warmth.

Dave T
(DaveT) - F
oh quilts again. on 03/02/2009 15:12:16 MST Print View

no, i haven't tried it. however, i have laid under a zipped open sleeping bag. does that = a quilt? somehow i think there will be a critical distinction found, as is the way with BPLers. :)

this has been discussed ad nauseum in other threads so i won't go into it too much. for me, if a 35 degree quilt (examples above) weighs 16-23 oz and a high-quality fully-zipped 35 degree bag weighs 20 or so, i'll go for the option of a full zip. i don't need a bivy to seal up drafts, i love to toss and turn, i don't care for straps, i love zippers, don't like to carry more clothing just to stretch the comfort rating of quilt, etc. but let's start a new thread if we want to talk more about this (or simply re-read one of the old ones), since i don't want to hijack any further and this has already been talked about A LOT. obviously there are MANY solutions to the MANY styles/places/etc. of lightweight backpacking.

search forums on "bag vs. quilt" or "quilt"... cheers!

Edited by DaveT on 03/02/2009 15:20:05 MST.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 15:28:25 MST Print View

I'm with Quoddy. I have and use the No Sniveler , I like the versatility as I can have or not a foot box , so anything from around 32f ,with some clothing , all the way up to whatever...
I have seen and fiddled with the Arc Alpinist, nice stuff, the Nunatac is a bit more specific, so for some a lighter but as warm or warmer solution.
I also had in mind to use the JRB as a top bag, only tested that in my backyard , but it works.
Dave, don't feel bad, I used to think like that too as I can sort of use my WMs as a quilt, but for warmer weather I do prefer the JRB. Not a big deal, but the hood and the zips get in the way. However I do that with the Ultralite at times.
As with the WM bags, the No Sniveller has continuous baffles, so you can increase or decrease the loft on top .
Franco

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: oh quilts again. on 03/02/2009 15:46:20 MST Print View

Dave,

I'm not really looking to rehash the "to quilt or not to quilt?" question ... just trying to share my experience of learning to prefer (and like) choices that I initially was certain were not for me.

Oh, and yes ... I consider laying under an unzipped sleeping bag to be quilting ... albeit a largish quilt.

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Re: oh quilts again. on 03/02/2009 16:07:02 MST Print View

Mmmmmm, I LOVE largish quilts with full length zippers and a footbox ;)

I was certain that a quilt would be for me. I couldn't have been more wrong! Pedro and I swapped my Arc Alpinist for his POD 15 and I have never looked back (not sure what Pedro did with the Arc in the end...?). But obviously quilt lovers are not gonna be interested in a POD, even if you could still get the POD30 for one pound of warmth down to at least freezing.

If money is not a great concern and your sold on a 'quilt', an Arc Alpinist would be a good investment, otherwise a JRB (especially if you don't want the footbox and want to use it as a top bag).

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 16:22:08 MST Print View

Pedro is using the Arc. That is the one I mentioned.
Franco

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 16:27:18 MST Print View

Franco, do you mean you are using Pedro's Arc? Cool. I can't imagine you would nned any warmth at all at the moment. Must be too hot to sleep under anything more than a wet silk sheet!

Edited by retropump on 03/02/2009 16:28:32 MST.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 16:45:52 MST Print View

Sorry, I meant that Pedro is using it, I just fondled it..
Franco

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 16:51:32 MST Print View

I wonder if we should form a support group for fondlers? There's so much stuff I would love to fondle but have no intention of buying. Maybe we could form a co-op...

Piper S.
(sbhikes) - F

Locale: Santa Barbara (Name: Diane)
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/02/2009 16:57:58 MST Print View

I got a GoLite quilt last spring. The Nunatek quilts looked really nice, but I was able to order the Golite quilt and have it delivered to me on the PCT last year, so that is why I went with a pre-made quilt rather than a make-to-order (or make-it-yourself) quilt.

I had been sleeping with my sleeping bag unzipped and preferred it because it made for a bigger blanket to sleep under. I got the quilt to save some space in my pack and weight on my back since my bag is old and rather huge.

I really like the quilt. I toss and turn, sleep on my side and stomach sometimes and find that a quilt is more like my bed with blankets at home.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/03/2009 11:03:25 MST Print View

Okay, no one groan, I know I mention it all the time... WM Summerlite! 19 ounce 32*F, um, zippered quilt.

Paul Sturrock
(Byblow) - F
Backpacking Light UL 60 Quilt vs. Backpacking Light PRO 90 Quilt on 03/03/2009 12:32:10 MST Print View

Wow, these are really cheap at $108 and $117 respectively. Which would be a better bag for summer backpacking in the southern Rockies (New Mexico and Colorado) and Tetons? Would one of these make a decent overbag for my REI Sub Kilo (the BPL ad says the PRO 90 can be used as an overbag, but says nothing about the UL 60 in this regard)? Are there any other affordable quilts out there?

Edited by Byblow on 03/03/2009 12:51:14 MST.

Adrian B
(adrianb) - MLife

Locale: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/03/2009 13:05:33 MST Print View

The premium option is either an Arc Ghost or Arc Specialist, depending on your preference for size/roominess.

Adrian B
(adrianb) - MLife

Locale: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/03/2009 13:07:51 MST Print View

>I wonder if we should form a support group for fondlers?

You'd have to make it awfully clear exactly what the group is about...

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Re: Re: What's a good summertime quilt? on 03/03/2009 13:24:42 MST Print View

>You'd have to make it awfully clear exactly what the group is about...

Ummm, it would be to support folks with uncontrolled urges to fondle new UL gear. Of course, if there are other fondling urges around, we could always form a separate support group, but might have problems with the, ummm, text filter...

Ryan Stoughton
(TxTengu) - F

Locale: Seattle
BPL Quilts on 03/03/2009 13:40:52 MST Print View

Hi Paul,

I have both the BPL 60 and 180 quilts and find them to be great pieces of gear! I've had the 60 down to about 40 degrees with a Cocoon pullover and was quite warm. (w/o the pullover I started to get a little chilly at about 45 degrees.) I used the 180 on a trip I took to Utah 2 years ago and it performed flawlessly. One night the temps got down to about 28 degrees but I slept pretty comfortable. (I was again wearing the Cocoon pullover and a hat. I was also sleeping in a Tarptent Rainbow.) I would expect the 90 to be somewhere in between as far as warmth goes.

There are only two caveats with the BPL quilts:

1. Narrow Cut - These are cut quite a bit more narrow than the GoLite Ultra or the JRB quilts. I've never had any real problems with drafts, but I sleep in a tent.

2. Cord Thingy - Across the bottom of each quilt is a piece of cord with a cord lock that is designed to allow for "variable girth". I like to put these straps under my pad to keep the quilt in place as my sleeping position changes throughout the night. I found this somewhat difficult to do with the stock cord that came with the BPL quilts. I could get the pad (a Montbell 90 pad) under the cord, but it next morning the loops that the cord attaches to on the quilt showed ALOT of wear. My solution was to get rid of the cord and fashion my own out of some shock cord. I secured some plastic mitten hooks to each end that clip into the fabric tabs on the quilt. This keeps the quilt in place and (due to the stretchy nature of shock cord) appears to be alot easier on the fabric loops on the quilt. It also allows me to use a thicker pad (BA Clearview) if I want.

In regards to using them as overbags...my understanding (from BPL customer service) is that the 60 and 90 were designed to be used as overquilts for the 180 to boost the temp rating. The footbox on the 60 is wide enough to slip over the 180, but when I tried putting it over the footbox of an older Marmot down bag it definitely compressed the insulation. I would assume that the 90 is the same.

Hope that helps and sorry for rambling!