How to provide a hip belt for a pack that does not have one
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Robert Blean
(blean) - MLife

Locale: San Jose -- too far from Sierras
How to provide a hip belt for a pack that does not have one on 02/25/2009 15:20:37 MST Print View

I have a GoLite Breeze (i know .. antediluvian), which I like a lot. Sometimes I wish it had a hip belt, though.

Does anyone know a good weight-appropriate way to provide an effective hip belt for such a pack?

-- MV

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: How to provide a hip belt for a pack that does not have one on 02/25/2009 17:04:29 MST Print View

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Edited by butuki on 02/25/2009 17:14:59 MST.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: How to provide a hip belt for a pack that does not have one on 02/25/2009 19:00:57 MST Print View

you could use the pattern for the hip belt of the g4. I like to add 1" to the height and use it upside down. You could also use 1" or 1.5" webbing.

To add it to the pack:

1. Position the belt or webbing against the back piece and pin it to the back piece so the raw edge is against the seam of the back and side pieces. Put the pins at least 1" from the seam of the back and side of the pack

2. Turn the pack inside out. Make sure the raw edge of the webbing or belt is still where you want it and sew it on (you are sewing with the inside back facing you and the inside side piece facing the sewing table. The existing seam should be to the right of the needle and the pack to the left.) Sew 1/2" from the existing seam line. Start 3/4" above the webbing or belt and end at least a 1/2" bellow it. Stitch it 2 or 3 times

3. Do it on the other side.

This is very easy to. Will slightly reduce the interior volume, very slightly. If you want it to look even nicer you can start and end the stitch on the existing seam. Just draw a line from the seam to the new 1/2" seam allowance and sew along it. if the new seam starts 3/4" above the belt start the line from the old seam 1" above that and the same on the bottom.(does that make sense?) Doing it that way will make a slightly nicer transition, but in my opinion isn't that big a deal.

If you're up for a real pain in the butt you can use a seam ripper to open the existing seam and put the belt/webbing into it and close it back up. This is the "best" way, but i would just do it the first way.


-Tim

David Stott
(Hikerdaddy) - F

Locale: Smokey Mountians
HIp Belt / Lift Straps on 02/26/2009 07:12:33 MST Print View

I am in the process of making my own pack and I was wondering about attaching a hip belt, but I also want to add load lifting straps. Whats the best way and how effective will they be on a frameless pack?

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: HIp Belt / Lift Straps on 02/26/2009 16:13:20 MST Print View

load lifters on the hipbelt (pull load toward low back) aren't that important in my mind as the pack already sits into the hips, but above the straps (pull load to shoulders) helps to keep the top of the pack from pulling the weight away from you. Attach the webbing to the pack where the extension meets the back piece and put ladder lock buckles on the shoulder strap to accept it. I did this on a pack i made for a young boy. I loved how it pulled the weight of the load in instead of it pulling away from the back. I haven't tested it at all as that pack has long left my shop and i haven't added it to any others.

-Tim