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Jeremy Greene
(tippymcstagger) - F

Locale: North Texas
Where can I legally walk? on 02/17/2009 18:03:17 MST Print View

Aside from well-marked trails, where can I go?
What is allowed on BLM land? National Forest/Grassland? Corps? Floodplains?
How does one go about getting permission to cross private property?
How do you choose/create long routes?

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Where can I legally walk? on 02/17/2009 18:09:07 MST Print View

It's much easier to beg forgiveness than ask permission.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Where can I legally walk? on 02/17/2009 18:43:42 MST Print View

"It's much easier to beg forgiveness than ask permission."

As long as you're not seeking absolution from someone's guard dog. ;-)

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
"Where can I legally walk?" on 02/17/2009 18:54:21 MST Print View

I'm with Craig on this one. There is very little that a genuine smile and appology cant get you out of. If all else fails you can leagally run. Ali

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: "Where can I legally walk?" on 02/17/2009 20:39:19 MST Print View

"I'm with Craig on this one. There is very little that a genuine smile and appology cant get you out of. If all else fails you can leagally run. Ali"

Me, too, Ali. Most of the time. My comment about guard dogs was sort a tongue in cheek way of addressing a very real issue. IME, most of the time, especially when dealing with government types, a genuine smile and an apology works wonders after the fact. Where it pays to be a bit more careful is when private property is involved. People are all over the place when it comes to their property rights, and it is prudent to inquire around if your plans include crossing private property. The locals are usually pretty forthcoming about local idiosyncrasies. It can't hurt, and just might save you a lot of grief. Lots of times just going up to the owner's house and asking will get you a free pass. My $.02.

David Erekson
(finallyME) - F

Locale: Utah desert
BLM and National Forests on 02/24/2009 14:23:51 MST Print View

BLM has a website with rules, along with National Forests. They will tell you what you can and can't do.

jason kawaja
(jasonk) - F

Locale: occupied south
national forests/wma on 03/06/2009 03:11:17 MST Print View

would be wise to stick to established hiking routes on land where recreation is designated. most of the time the land area will be designated to address various recreation needs such as hunting, ohv/ohm, etc and that hardly has a desired presence while walking in the woods. the established routes are supposed to be designed to lesson the impacts of user conflicts.

private property is just that, an individual owns it and could very well be their back or front yard so look up the owner information at your property appraiser office/website and make contact if you want permission. i prefer to enjoy being outdoors without having to look over my shoulder wondering if the current rule/law im breaking is going unnoticed.