Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
Ray Jardine Quilt Kit - Not enough for Big Guys
Display Avatars Sort By:
JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Ray Jardine Quilt Kit - Not enough for Big Guys on 02/15/2009 06:33:30 MST Print View

We have a couple quilts we have made from other plans but I wanted to see what the fuss was about with Ray Jardines with regards to the "Groget" and "Draftstopper" that he has trademarked.

I am 6'3 and broad shouldered. Ray's ordering process alerts one to pay extra if your over 6'1" so my wife did.

After we received the kit and started reading the instructions, I was caught right away by the second page in which you are instructed how to determine "width" in order to build Ray's quilt properly with the draft stopper.

It states you are to lie on the floor on your side and measure your girth at the shoulder area, floor to floor. So for me, that is 44 inches. Your then instructed to add 12 inches for floor coverage and an additional 2 inches for seam allowance. For me that takes it right to 60 inches, or the average width of the fabric.

He illustrates that the "leftover" fabric on girth is supposed to be enough to construct a draft stopper 8-13 inches wide. So my fabric was 62 inches wide. hardly enough for leftovers! :)

Understand I am not making a complaint here, but, there is no mention of this on his website regarding the ordering process. So if you're a big guy, I would try to communicate with him in advance. I have done so after the fact and received no reply.

I went ahead and visited a local fabric shop here in town and bought some extra silnylon to create the draft stopper with. It's the biggest quilt I own, almost seems like it is too much but then again I haven't had a maiden voyage with it either. But geesh is it huge.

Joe Kuster
(slacklinejoe) - MLife

Locale: Flatirons
Ray Jardine Quilt Kit - Not enough for Big Guys on 02/15/2009 23:24:41 MST Print View

I had the same problem, luckily I had some extra material to use. Unfortunately, don't expect a reply back. As well as the instructions are laid out, they kind of leave the kit "as-is" and your SOL on support issues of almost any kind. As far as they are concerned all issues have been addressed in the book or instructions. They've even been known to black list people who write in reviews or even post on forums regarding minor criticisims of their gear.

There are a few things I wish I'd known before I made my quilt. First, if you consider yourself a person who tosses and turns, quilts are probably not for you, at least not without a bivy which negates the weight savings.

Second, the concept of using a quilt in the summer is completely different than that of a winter quilt. I built the 10 degree version and unfortunately the slightest movement and lack of sufficently sized draft stoppers are a huge problem and lead to nights of extreme discomfort. Ray's response in his books has been that "you'll learn in your sleep to stop turning" but that pretty much only worked for him judging from stories from others, if you move in your sleep, you'll just get hypothermic.

Third, expect the quilt to be 3 times the bulk of a down sleeping bag of similar ratings. Simply put, I didn't have room in my pack for the watermelon sized synthetic 10 degree quilt.

Fourth, Sil nylon is not breathable and as such is not comfortable against bare skin in humid environments. Wear light a base layer even in the summer to prevent sticking to it.

All in all, I used the summer and winter quilt for about a year before determining a hooded bag system is far more failsafe for my endevors where getting cold had consequenses. Thanks to my location and packing methods for trips, I rarely am in sustained wet and even when I am, I have never had a down bag fail on me. Quilt wise, I found the Jacks or Better down quilt far superior in comfort, flexibility, weight and compactness, even still I found a bag sysem more ideal for colder temperatures.

Edited by slacklinejoe on 02/15/2009 23:30:18 MST.

JR Redding
(GrinchMT) - F
Re: Ray Jardine Quilt Kit - Not enough for Big Guys on 02/16/2009 11:52:01 MST Print View

I appreciate your response Joe. I'm pretty familiar with quilts already as I pointed out we had made several others from different plans.

I don't expect a reply at this point and I wasn't even angry about it with them. I did however point out that maybe they should include that information on their ordering process the same as they include the note about length. Whats the harm in saying "You'll need an extra yard or two of fabric if your girth is over this size?" I would have been more than willing to pay for the extra fabric right then and there on the spot and have it shipped with the kit.

Oh well. I just hope this info finds its way to others that may be of a larger size before they order a kit from them.

logon smith
(logon) - F
Re: on 04/07/2010 23:42:22 MDT Print View

Second, the concept of using a quilt in the summer is completely different than that of a winter quilt. I built the 10 degree version and unfortunately the slightest movement and lack of sufficently sized draft stoppers are a huge problem and lead to nights of extreme discomfort. Ray's response in his books has been that "you'll learn in your sleep to stop turning" but that pretty much only worked for him judging from stories from others [url=http://www.ccspquestions.com]ccsp[/url] if you move in your sleep, you'll just get hypothermic.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: on 04/08/2010 06:44:37 MDT Print View

even though it sux that his kit didn't actually let you build his quilt, a quilt 58-60" wide should be plenty big enough on it's own. I am 300# and can use a 52" wide half tapered quilt with little fuss. (i might go to 54/56 this year to see if i sleep easier with a tad more room, but still well within what he supplied)

It would be great if he could offer some customer service but i understand how he can't. I think it even makes mention to that fact on his site.

It would also be nice if he disclosed what insulation and what weights he used. I assume he doesn't because quilts are easy to make without plans and if people knew what he was using they could make it much cheaper by just getting the stuff from OWFINC or thru-hiker, still more information is always better.

-Tim