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Ralph McNall
(rumps) - F

Locale: SF Bay
Tyvek Backpack on 02/13/2009 19:21:04 MST Print View

I totally forgot about how great it is to make your own gear. I used to do it all the time when I was a little kid, but then I grew up and got a job and just started buying stuff - till I found this website. So here is the first project that I completed: My Tyvek Backpack.

I pulled the straps and some hardware off of a camelback I never use. It has a front zipper pocket, bladder and frame pockets on the inside. Two side mesh ones, compression straps. I gave it a roll-top lid, but I think I will switch that to a drawstring. Volume starts about 1300 in3 and expands to around 2300, weighs in at 9.5 oz.

Tyvek pack on back


tyvek pack front


tyvek pack back


tyvek pack inside

Edited by rumps on 02/13/2009 19:23:31 MST.

Jolly Green Giant
(regultr) - MLife

Locale: www.jolly-green-giant.blogspot.com
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/13/2009 19:27:34 MST Print View

Nice work. Be sure to come back after a stretch with a report on its durability.

Kevin Egelhoff
(kegelhoff) - F

Locale: Southern Cal
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/13/2009 20:20:40 MST Print View

Ralph,
I can't believe that is your FIRST project ... looks like something purchased off the self !!! Very nice work !!
Definitly want to hear how the Tyvek holds up in a pack of this size. What weight do you plan on carrying with the pack ?

Kevin

Unknown abc
(edude) - F
"Tyvek Backpack" on 02/13/2009 20:26:10 MST Print View

I second Kevin, that looks like a storebought item!!!

Very good work!!!

-Evan

Michael Chudzinski
(oknowa) - F
Wow !!! on 02/13/2009 21:01:15 MST Print View

That is very cool,great job man !

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: "Tyvek Backpack" on 02/13/2009 22:07:53 MST Print View

Fantastic piece of work. What type of Tyvek did you use? I can just imagine pulling a Tarptent Sublite out of that great pack. Congratulations.

Jeremy Greene
(tippymcstagger) - F

Locale: North Texas
tyvek backpack--mesh shoulder straps? on 02/13/2009 22:54:50 MST Print View

I am interested to see more images of the straps. Nice and airy.

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/13/2009 23:41:58 MST Print View

Awsome pack, Ralph!!! It's just simply, awesome!! How long did it take you? What would you say was your total, estimated monetary investment?

Edited by socalpacker on 02/13/2009 23:44:33 MST.

D LARSON
(epilektric) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Tyvek Backpack - Hip belt on 02/14/2009 15:41:34 MST Print View

That pack looks awesome. Great job!
It doesn't look like there is any padding in the hip belt. Do you still find it comfortable and do you think it affects the performance of the pack in any way?

Ralph McNall
(rumps) - F

Locale: SF Bay
Tyvek Backpack on 02/14/2009 19:21:46 MST Print View

Thanks for all the responses. The base of the pack is made out of Tyvek 1059B and the soft stuff at the top I think is 1422A or whatever they make tyvek aprons out of. I definitely questioned the durability going into this, so before I started on the bag I made a little sack because i wanted to test out the tape that I was going to reinforce the seams with. Then I filled it with rocks and tossed it around for a while, and it held up surprisingly well. So we'll see how it performs over time, but I can always just put more tape on...

Other than some thread and a couple feet of elastic I had the rest of this stuff already, so I probably put about 5 bucks and 20 hours of time into it. The straps are just mesh, but are surprising comfortable. I've loaded it up with about 15 lbs so far and seems to do fine. I don't really expect to be carrying much more than that. I think it will make a nice bag for the overnight trips. There have been lots of other posts on here about belt or no belt, but I always seem to use them and the tyvek doesn't weigh much. I don't know how much it will help in transferring weight to my hips, but it will at least help hold it to my body for when I'm climbing around or running.straps

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/14/2009 20:28:26 MST Print View

Did you use nylon thread? And, if you did, was there a particular guage or thickness? I'm also curious about the needle and the tape.

Thanks,

Kendall

PS I've never made ANY gear before. I don't know if it's the economy or curiousity, but I've been thinking about making some of my own gear lately (a quilt and a pack). I think it'd be hugely rewarding.

Edited by socalpacker on 02/14/2009 20:32:19 MST.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/15/2009 07:15:23 MST Print View

I've never made ANY gear before. I don't know if it's the economy or curiousity, but I've been thinking about making some of my own gear lately (a quilt and a pack). I think it'd be hugely rewarding.

Kendall,

It was cost savings that got me started but I long ago came to realize that those last six words sum up the drive to MYOG. Go for it!

ben wood
(benwood)

Locale: flatlands of MO
tyvek backpack on 02/15/2009 09:30:18 MST Print View

nice job. the work looks great. i like the camelbak harness too nice light and airy. very cool.

D LARSON
(epilektric) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Thread for Tyvek project on 02/15/2009 14:19:27 MST Print View

I have to second Kendall's request about the thread. I've often pondered the best thread for this or that.

I have some nylon stuff that looks like fishing line (I thinks it's nylon) and some sweet Kevlar thread my brother gave me but haven't found a use for them yet.

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re:Tyvek Backpack on 02/15/2009 16:01:35 MST Print View

Jim,

Thanks for the encouragement. I started looking at sewing machines and talking to my mom who used to do quite a bit of sewing. She was encouraging as well. Sears has a couple of models for just under $100. I think as a beginner maybe I'll start with one of those.

Edited by socalpacker on 02/15/2009 21:42:16 MST.

Michael Chudzinski
(oknowa) - F
sewing on 02/15/2009 17:58:04 MST Print View

Kendall,

As a newcomer to MACHINE sewing...All I can say is,GO for it!

I bought a cheap Janome machine,it will do all I need for now. Less than a 100 bucks,seems to be great quality for the money.

I have made stuffsacks,patched packs,bags,etc.

My next project is making a quilt for my buddy out of his 30 year old bag.

I just picked up an old DRESSMAKER machine for 20 bucks. Heavy steel rig that will do some heavy duty work. Put a belt on it and it is working just fine.

I am addicted to sewing now,and I do not have to beg my wife anymore.

I hemmed(spelling?)my first pair of pants this morning,I am free !!!

Sewing is only as difficult as you make it,anyone can do the basic stuff. It is mostly common sense and a few tricks.You just need to think things out in advance. My wife was amazed at some of the ideas I came up with,not like I am a genius. Like I tell her...I don't mean to make sense...but....and then she tells me to shut the hell up.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Thread for Tyvek project on 02/15/2009 19:12:35 MST Print View

> some sweet Kevlar thread my brother gave

Very tricky stuff to use. It is rarely needed, and can give worse results if misused. Yes, I have Kevlar thread, and no, I don't use it much at all.

I would recommend you don't use it until you have had a LOT of experience with sewing with ordinary threads.

Cheers

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/15/2009 21:41:09 MST Print View

Thanks Mike... I mean I probably wouldn't be able to do as good a job as Ralph did on his Tyvek pack. I mean that takes experience, which a lot of you have. But, making ultralight gear that's functional would be really fulfilling, not to mention save hundreds even thousands of dollars. By the way Mike your post, although true, is very funny.

Roger,
What's the scoop on kevlar thread? Why is it so challenging to work with?

Edited by socalpacker on 02/15/2009 23:40:49 MST.

Matthew Roberts
(matthewjamesroberts) - F

Locale: San Fernando Valley
Kevlar Thread on 02/15/2009 23:28:01 MST Print View

I used to use Kevlar thread to sew up my fire tools (DIY Kevlar wicks) when I performed as a Fire Dancer. It's tough-stuff. I found the thread to be sufficient for hand stitching high-impact areas - running it through a machine is a whole different story.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 00:23:27 MST Print View

> What's the scoop on kevlar thread? Why is it so challenging to work with?

As Matthew said, it is very stiff and hard. That means it runs poorly through a machine needle. This can create a lot of friction, which heats up the needle and that then melts the Kevlar in the needle. Messy.
---------
Correction, thanks to Dave Olsen: it frays and breaks fibres at the needle, but this may be due to its high stiffness rather than melting, as Kevlar has a very high melt temperature. But that still causes a mess!
--------

My experience is that ordinary polycotton or nylon thread, even fine stuff, is as strong as the lightweight fabrics we normally use - provided you use short stitches and make a good seam.

About the only place where you might want to use Kevlar thread is sewing 100% Kevlar fabric. There the thread is matched to the fabric. Good for bullet-proof jackets, but irrelevant for most UL gear.

------
Also, as I was reminded by Dave Olsen, Kevlar is UV-sensitive. This is not good for outdoors gear.
------

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 02/18/2009 14:49:25 MST.

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 00:32:17 MST Print View

Roger,

Would you use a polycotton or nylon thread with cuben fabric? I'm thinking of making a cuben fabric pack and experimenting with a cuben fabric tarp.

You guys (people in the MYOG forum) have really fired me up. Tomorrow I'm picking up a 35 year old "White" sewing machine I found on Craig's List. She says it works fine. It's just due to be serviced and she decided to get a newer machine... $10!!!

Also, does anyone have an opinion about primaloft (about 2") for quilt insulation?

Edited by socalpacker on 02/16/2009 11:54:16 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 13:19:47 MST Print View

Hi Kendall

I need to explain the difference between the two threads.

Nylon thread is usually pure nylon, is sometimes bonded, and is usually very strong. However, it can be a bit tricky to handle at times: it can kink up in my experience.

Polycotton (the good version anyhow) has a core of polyester fibres, surrounded by cotton fibres. The cotton lets the thread slide through the needle a bit easier, and when the needle gets warm (hot) during high speed sewing the cotton prevents the hot needle from partially melting the synthetic part of the thread. Yes, this can happen - with 100% polyester or nylon threads. Finally, when the cotton fibres get damp they can swell up a bit, blocking the needle hole.

For this reason one is usually better off using a polycotton thread for most sewing. I would normally only use 100% nylon thread for sewing webbing and heavy Cordura where that is going to be under load.

But don't think that polycotton is a whole lot weaker than nylon: it isn't. I use it for my tents quite happily - in quite a fine version.

What to use for Cuben? I have tested this fabric, and I would use a fine polycotton thread, but I would tape the seams afterwards to spread the load across the film rather than having it concentrated entirely on the sewing holes. A 'seam stick transfer tape' such as 3M9485PC is good.

Cheers

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 13:32:48 MST Print View

Roger,

Thank you. That was extremely helpful.

Kendall

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 14:11:20 MST Print View

Ralph,

Are all of your seams sewn or are some of them taped? How did you seal the seams that are sewn? It seams that sewing and Tyvek would not work real well together as it would make a perforation like a paper towel.

I'm thinking that one would need to use the sewing machine to make the nice pretty lines and corners and then reinforce the seams with a Tyvek type tape, which would also seal them as well.

I am thinking about making a tarp tent out of tyvek which is why I ask all the questions...

Great Project Ralph!! Inspiring!

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 14:13:30 MST Print View

Roger, would that 3M tape work well for sealing Tyvek seams as well? Would it be strong enough to relieve stress on a sewn seam in the Tyvek?

Thanks!

D LARSON
(epilektric) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Kevlar thread on 02/16/2009 15:51:56 MST Print View

Roger, thank you for your knowledgeable insight on Kevlar thread. You are a wealth of information.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 16:29:06 MST Print View

Kendall,

Primaloft can be used for quilts but it requires you to "quilt" it. It must be stabilized to the fabric throughout the large panels. Climashield on the other hand can just be edge stabilized (sewn to the fabric on the edges) making it a much simpler choice for MYOG quilters like myself. Also XP has highest CLO i know of making it warmer for the weight.

-Tim

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 17:37:33 MST Print View

Hey guys, we hooked another one! he-he

Kendall,

An emphatic ditto to what Tim said about XP being easier to work with for quilts. But I do like Primaloft for clothing, where you get quite a bit of quilting for "free" as part of the construction process.

Regarding a 2" thick synthetic quilt. Warm quilt! For PL or XP That'd offer an insulation value of about 6CLO ... which would keep me comfortable at about 10*F with little in the way of insulated clothing (nylon pants and shirt over a light poly base layer, warm socks) ... as always, YMMV

A single layer of 5oz XP would likely serve you down into the lower 30's ... well down into the 20's if you add lightly insulated clothing that you will likely want to also have along at those temps.

Jason Griffin
(JGriffinRN) - F
Tyvek Pack on 02/16/2009 17:43:02 MST Print View

Very nice job on that pack! Could you give some close up shots of your seams please?

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: RE: Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 18:02:32 MST Print View

Hi Jeremy

> would that 3M tape work well for sealing Tyvek seams as well

3M9485PC is used and sold as a 'seam stick' transfer tape for making lightweight spinnakers for racing yachts. They do actually make some spinnakers with JUST the tape: no sewing at all. It makes a 'permanent' bond.

As an example, some may remember a light-weight Dimension Polyant fabric which had a bright orange layer of PU coating on one side. It was often called something like 'titanium' as it may have had some titanium oxide in the PU coating to make it UV-resistant. It was originally made for NASA as a fabric for (very) high altitude ballons. The coating was utterly waterproof, and quite thick and well-bonded. My first MYOG snow tent was made of this stuff.

I had some 3M9485 tape on a bit of this fabric for testing. After a few days, I tried to peel the tape off the coating. It wouldn't come off; instead it ripped the coating off the nylon cloth. That's a fairly strong bond!

Yes, it will bond to Tyvek, and yes, it should be good.

Cheers

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/16/2009 21:18:26 MST Print View

Tim & Jim

Thanks for the great advice. I wasn't thinking that I have cocoon wear as well. I just got back from picking up my sewing machine. I think I want to start with a quilt. Climashield XP sounds great. Now, I just have to find a pattern and instructions that I like and order the materials. So, I probably wont start for a couple of weeks. It'll give me time to familiarize myself with the machine. BTW the materials are surprisingly cheap compared to buying gear from a manufacturer! I was shocked at some of the prices I've seen! And, you don't have to compromise. You can make your gear just the way YOU want it. Of course, that's not news to you guys.

>Hey guys, we hooked another one! he-he

-LOL- Yeap! I think you got another convert. I'm looking forward to learning how to make my own.

Kendall

Edited by socalpacker on 02/16/2009 21:27:58 MST.

Ralph McNall
(rumps) - F

Locale: SF Bay
seams on 02/16/2009 23:57:11 MST Print View

Congrats on the sewing machine, Kendall.

So the seams for the tyvek backpack are a combination of thread and tape. The thread was polyester, I think I got the regular size from Gutermann at Joann Fabric, they also had a heavy duty. The pieces of tyvek that I had were on the smaller side so I often had to join 2 together to make a larger piece, and that was done with adhesive transfer tape like the stuff mentioned in earlier posts. I found it to be amazingly strong. I thought of making the whole pack with only taped seems, but I had a hard time picturing how it would all come together and have the shape that I wanted. I would still need thread to attach the mesh pockets and straps. Sewing tyvek is definitely different than most fabrics, and is really more like paper. Dupont recommends about 5 threads per inch and it works out pretty well, giving a fairly strong seam without tearing apart from the perforations. Never the less, I still went back and taped all my seams. Primarily it was to add strength, but also to waterproof it. The hardest part about sewing the tyvek for me was ending the seam. Usually you can back tack at the beginning and end of a line, but that doesn't really work, so I just relied on the tape to keep the thread from coming undone. I'll have to come up with a project where I can play around more with only taped seams. Perhaps a tyvek tent will be next...

Oh, and watch out for sewing through that tape - it will gunk up your needle and make a mess. I found I could use a little bit of wax on the needle if I had to get through a spot that I had already used it.

Edited by rumps on 02/17/2009 00:01:11 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: seams on 02/17/2009 01:56:58 MST Print View

Hi Ralph

> I found I could use a little bit of wax on the needle

Ah so! You are SO right about getting adhesive on the needle - a real mess. I had not thought about using wax, but I will try it out. I have tried light oil, but it is rather messy and does not last very long at all. Make marks on the fabric too.

Another problem is that the thread can get adhesive on it as well, and that also gums up in the eye of the needle.

Cheers

Rod Lawlor
(Rod_Lawlor) - MLife

Locale: Australia
Teflon lube on 02/17/2009 02:59:20 MST Print View

Roger,

You may also like to try a spray on Teflon lube on the needle. Oil and fabric scare me a bit. I always expect the oil to degrade the fabric rather quickly, although I'm not sure if this is true or not.

What's your stance on 100% polyester thread? I used some today to repair my Mid.

Dan Dyk
(leger) - F
ditty bags on 02/17/2009 03:36:44 MST Print View

Recycle Tyvek envelopes for ditty bags. Turn inside out so printing is inside. Closing flap can be cut off or used as bag flap or reinforcement of top. Roll a "cuff" about three or four thicknesses, crease each fold, maybe 1/2". Use paper punch to make holes around cuff, then thread a drawstring through holes. Or, two lengths of string, making loop of each after threading through holes. Pull loops and wrap and tie. Tyvek can be "softened" by crumpling into a ball several tiems. crushing and rolling in your hands. Tyvek bag will also serve to fetch water. Good as emergency mitts, over gloves. Or booties. Mukluks or gaiters can be made from Tyvek. Good for full face balaclava maybe with slit eyeholes, in bright snow. You can make slit goggles also. On and on. Tyvek footprint mat for your tent.

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: Sewing Tyvek... on 02/17/2009 08:49:08 MST Print View

I am slowing becoming a convert as well. It was easy enough before to just buy my own gear as I got bonuses, but with the economy down, no more bonuses... so now I start making my own gear.

My wife is totally making fun of me and telling everyone that I am going to take up sewing. Funny thing is that just a couple years ago I told her that she should sell her sewing machine as she never used it and hated sewing. I guess it all comes back around...

I think I am going to start working with Tyvek just because I already have it... Not sure how easy it is to work with, but we will just have to see. I had crafted a Tyvek bivy last summer with a footbox, but an open top... Never got a chance to use it. I just used Tyvek Tape to make it, but sewing it will be a whole different story.

Being an engineer, I have drafted up a few different designs in AutoCAD. Don't normally draw in 3D, so there has been a bit of a learning curve there. But it is nice to get a visual of what I am creating before I start cutting up a bunch of fabric.

How does working with Tyvek compare with SilNylon or other Nylons? I will be working with the HouseWrap type. Would it be best to crumple it up and wash it before I sew it?

Joe Clement
(skinewmexico) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Tyvek on 02/17/2009 09:14:38 MST Print View

I'm going to make a tyvek bivy some time myself. Need a good plan though......

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: Tyvek Bivy on 02/17/2009 09:47:20 MST Print View

Joe,

I've been thinking about making another one as well and have found a couple plans that I would modify a bit.

Backpacking Lite out of the UK has a super simple bivy pattern.

Six Moons Designs also has a bivy pattern on their website as well. It has a mosquito net attached to it which I would remove and then extend the top up like a normal bivy. These shows how to make a footbox which would be nice.

I was thinking I would take from a little of both of these and draw up my own template. Since I am 6'-4", I would probably add a little bit to the length.

If I get a chance later, maybe I will draw one up in AutoCAD and post on here...

Kendall Clement
(socalpacker) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Tyvek Backpack on 02/17/2009 09:55:45 MST Print View

Jeremy,

If you don't mind, I'd like to see your bivy plan when you're done. I looked at the Six Moon Designs bivy lasty night and had the same thoughts as you about the netting.

Kendall

Joe Clement
(skinewmexico) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Tyvek Backpack on 02/17/2009 09:57:32 MST Print View

Some guys on here had a neat bivy plan, I'll have to go look for it.

To the OP....amazing backpack.

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: Tyvek Backpack on 02/17/2009 11:14:24 MST Print View

I'm going to start a new thread for the Bivy Pattern as it is definitely off track from the OP.

Here's the link to the new thread...

We kind of hijacked this thread and I certainly don't want to take away from the great workmanship of the backpack!!

Edited by gustafsj on 02/17/2009 12:31:51 MST.

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
Nice! on 02/17/2009 12:12:17 MST Print View

Like everyone else has said, this is top shelf work! And please be sure to give a durability report. I have thought about makeing many different things out of tyvek, but durability has been an issue. However, if something as "high traffic" as a pack fairs well, we might see a lot more tyvek around my house. Again, great job.

David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
Re: Re: Kevlar thread Backpack on 02/18/2009 14:04:43 MST Print View

"As Matthew said, it is very stiff and hard. That means it runs poorly through a machine needle. This can create a lot of friction, which heats up the needle and that then melts the Kevlar in the needle. Messy."


Perhaps you mean Spectra, which has a low melting point.

Kevlar, like Nomex, chars rather than melts, which is
why it is used in fire fighting gear.

Kevlar behaves like a cross between thread and cable. It will
break down some when bent sharply-- like wire or cable. So
you lose some of the strength just running it through the sewing machine.

It also deteriorates in sunlight.

The strongest seams I know in Tyvek come from a heat sealing
machine.

Edited by oware on 02/18/2009 14:07:51 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Kevlar thread Backpack on 02/18/2009 14:44:40 MST Print View

Hi Dave

You may be right about the melting bit. What I found was that the thread frayed at the needle, creating a mess. I ASSUMED this was due to heat, but it may simply have been breaking due to extreme bending at the fine needle.

I have edited my posting accordingly.

Thanks
Roger

John Canfield
(jcanfield) - F

Locale: Cascadia
thread on 12/28/2011 23:53:28 MST Print View

I use db92 Coats Star Nylon Bonded thread for all pack building w/ my walking foot machine. Working with leather, I use 120db.

When using a needle feed machine, I use db69 for pack building, but prefer the strength of the 92 in many instances.

I only use bonded thread. I have repaired a few hundred backpacks and other miscellaneous carry products and have found core spun thread to be a weaker alternative in the long run.

I also agree about the kevlar thread. Not needed!

I have seen a Rip-Curl surfboard bag made in partnership with Dupont. Interesting stuff that tyvek... I am excited to see it in the consumer world outside of homewrap.

Lastly, needle choice is pretty important when working with a new material.

JC

Conner D
(cdipaolo) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re:Tyvek Backpack on 12/29/2011 12:45:07 MST Print View

Kendall,
I recently started MYOG and am using a Singer Brilliance. It was around $115 and I was going to get the non-computerized version (under $100) but they were out of stock. It is a great machine and I'm sure the lower level Singer machine is just as nice. One really nice feature of the Brilliance, though, is the automatic needle threader which has saved me probably 30 min (so far) or just threading needles.
-conner

Edit: sorry, I didn't realize that post was 3 years old haha...

Edited by cdipaolo on 12/29/2011 12:46:08 MST.

John Canfield
(jcanfield) - F

Locale: Cascadia
Tyvek backpack on 12/30/2011 17:02:53 MST Print View

I didn't realize it either! I was looking for info on people who have worked with tyvek, and forgot to look at the date.

JC

Byron Johnson
(BCLA) - MLife
tyvek pack on 12/28/2012 07:04:08 MST Print View

try spiderwire as an alternative thread choice. its a fishing line made to handle anything thrown at it ($15 a spool roughly). many different tinsel strengths but honestly I have caught 20+ pound fish on 8 lb version like they are just not up to the challenge.

if you run it through a machine let us know how it compares; I have only hand stitched to date.