Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
bear bags
Display Avatars Sort By:
Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Bear slapping 101 on 02/11/2009 18:58:37 MST Print View

"in America you have a better chance of being killed by a family member than you do a bear."

Ali, you've met my brother?

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
Bear slapping 101 on 02/11/2009 19:06:16 MST Print View

teerSam, sounds scary but I'm talking black not brown. I have had hundreds of bear encounters and only two were aggressive. Which is my point, most are not. Brown bears scare the crap out of me. While I tpically think that guns are for pu234seys I have never asked my guide to leave his behind in brown bear country. lived in Meyers in Tahoe and had bears in my yard daily. It didnt stop me from fishing in the upper Truckee which ran right through my yard or sleeping in my teepee with the door open all night. Ali

Edited by barefootnavigator on 02/11/2009 19:10:47 MST.

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
Bear slapping 101 on 02/11/2009 19:07:58 MST Print View

Denis, if I had would I still be here? I think I might skip the next reunion if that is ok. Ali

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
bear bags... on 02/11/2009 19:41:13 MST Print View

>> one eyewitness account of the big bad boogie man bear<<

As I mentioned in my earlier post, the camper next to me was clawed through his tent. Not a tall tale, but sorry I don't have photos.

I also had a bear clean out my cook pot for me. I guess nobody told him he was supposed to be afraid of me.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: bear bags on 02/11/2009 20:19:23 MST Print View

I personally applied a skillet to the nose of a cub black bear, then continued to chased it out of camp. The next morning we could see where 'Mom' had paused to dig a little, and the punctures she left in our aluminum fuel bottle.

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
Bear slapping 101 on 02/11/2009 20:29:28 MST Print View

Mike, so you saw it with your own two eyes? And you can positively identify it as a black bear? Tell the truth. Ali

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Bear slapping 101 on 02/11/2009 20:33:30 MST Print View

"That does sound like a tale, a friend of a friend???"

You're sounding more and more like Timothy Treadwell with every passing post, Ali; or maybe you do your long distance hiking at a petting zoo?. The "tale" is true which, I'll wager, is more than you can say about your "swatting a bear on the nose" BS. If you ever get down to SEKI or Yosemite NP's, check with any ranger station in the area. They'll have a whole list of Boogie Man stories to regale you with. Or maybe those master spinners of tall tales over at SIBBG. BTW, I'd love to see a picture of you swatting a bear. Meantime, I'll keep an eye out for your name when the winner of the 2009 Darwin Award is announced.

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
Bear slapping 101 SHEESH on 02/11/2009 20:47:55 MST Print View

So tom, how do you get your food from one tree to the next, wont they just eat you when your hiking. I wonder how Andrew Skurka has hikes a bizillean miles with food in his pack and survived? Maybe he can help us. Anyways if you are going to respond to a thread you should read it first. A question was asked and and answer was given. Who are you to critisize how I spend my time in the backcountry. The only thing to fear is fear itself. Ali PS I still love you even if you hate me. :) Kisses Ali

Luke Ochsenbein
(LukeOchsen) - F

Locale: Ozarks
Re: Bear Bags on 02/11/2009 20:50:00 MST Print View

I have a feeling that if tim treadwell had been infatuated with black as opposed to brown bears he would still be here. . .

To reply to the thread: I use a drysack I picked up at wall mart (i know i know) that has lasted 2 seasons so far along with 50 ft. of paracord and a minibiner. Weighs about 3 oz.

Edited by LukeOchsen on 02/11/2009 20:51:45 MST.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Bear slapping 101 SHEESH on 02/11/2009 20:58:36 MST Print View

Enough is enough, Ali. I just choose my campsites carefully
and avoid areas frequented by a lot of people and, therefore, bears. I don't live in fear of them anymore than you do. I just have a lot more respect for them than you seem to. You get that way if you've had a serious run in with a bear(black), which I have. I read the thread, several times, and just got tired of the BS. Criticize the way you hike? I could care less, but if you put it out there expect some responses. As for hating you? I don't even know you. I just don't care much for BS, that's all.
A big hug and a kiss to you and let's just leave the whole thing lie, huh. Tom

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
bear bags on 02/12/2009 00:41:00 MST Print View

Ali -

I share Tom's sentiments and if you read my original post, you will notice that my issue is with careless camping as it may lead to the destruction of a bear. I don't care what risks you take but why put the bears at risk?

After the incident I mentioned the rangers brought in a bear trap. They didn't actually tell me it was a bear trap and I don't have any pictures to run by you, but it seemed a bit large for racoons.

Ali e
(barefootnavigator) - F

Locale: Outside
Bear slapping on 02/12/2009 01:45:54 MST Print View

I agree with you mike and more bears are killed every year by motorists than by being put down due to being a danger to the public so by your own words I must insist that you never drive again or you may be the cause of the death of a bear. Seriously you must never dive again or many innocent creatures will be at risk. You have been warned. Mike its time you lead us all by example. Ali

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
bear bags... on 02/12/2009 08:59:56 MST Print View

I drive and camp responsibly. That's all I ask of anybody.

To the OP I will apologize for allowing myself to be drawn in on this discussion. I will however point out that of the posters on this thread that actually did stay on topic, only one recommends sleeping with your food. I've never actually heard anybody that recommends this technique but I will acknowledge it is another option.

Mike Whitesell
(madgoat) - F

Locale: Ohio
on topic on 02/12/2009 11:05:19 MST Print View

Mike, I believe that Ray Jardine recommends sleeping with your food. I haven't read his latest rendition of PCT Hikers Guide / Beyond Backpacking, but he seemed to think that if you stealth camped away from all the commotion, the bears wouldn't bug you.

As for me, I hike mostly in the Smokies. They have cable systems installed at all the campsites, but I still use an ursack because of the voracious rodents that have managed to steal my food from the high wires.

The mice have no fear. One night I had a mouse chew through my wrist strap on my trekking pole that I was using to hold up my tarptent. I am surprised this didn't wake me up because my head was inches from the trekking pole strap all night long..... The critter must have been after the salt in the strap.

(I don't know for sure if it was a mouse. I did not see it with my own eyes, nor did I get any pictures. It could have been a chipmunk I guess.)

David Bengoechea
(daveben) - F

Locale: Calgary, Canada
bear bags on 02/12/2009 12:28:26 MST Print View

Hiking & camping in known black & grizzly bear country here in the Alberta & BC Rocky Mountains: I keep all my food, toiletries, garbage, etc in either single or doubled-up ziploc bags packed in an Outdoor Research Hydroseal Dry Sack. Hung about 30' up a tree, in a camp-site food locker, or from a bear pole.
bear pole

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: bear bags... on 02/12/2009 14:59:12 MST Print View

Mike says:
"I drive and camp responsibly. That's all I ask of anybody.

To the OP I will apologize for allowing myself to be drawn in on this discussion. I will however point out that of the posters on this thread that actually did stay on topic, only one recommends sleeping with your food. I've never actually heard anybody that recommends this technique but I will acknowledge it is another option."

I do not, and would not recommend sleeping with one's food. It's just what I do. If I camp where bears equate people with food I secure my food in a responsible manner. If I had to deal with Brown Bears I would be careful to exercise every caution, as one should.

The areas in which I choose to hike are those where the black bears, and other animals, are truly wild. More than once I have camped in areas where bear sign is evident and have heard bears growling, mostly in the early evening and at dawn. In those areas I have never had any bear in camp. I sleep well knowing that the Golden Mantled Ground Squirrels are the most likely predators to try for my food.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Consider the consequences on 02/12/2009 20:31:03 MST Print View

I have no doubt that a careful backpacker can get away with sleeping with his food next to his head or in his tent a vast majority of the time. I did it a few times some years ago in places where I was pretty confident a bear wouldn't show up. But then I got to thinking about the potential consequences of that one in a thousand, or whatever the odds might be, times when the bear does show up and went back to counter balancing(occasionally, an Ursack of late). I applied the same logic that led me not to run it out more than 15 feet or so when climbing(there were exceptions, obviously). Simply put in either case: If you take the riskier option, you'd better be right ALL the time. With the less risky option, you've only got to be right once. Consider the consequences and choose according to your appetite for risking them. My .02.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Consider the consequences on 02/12/2009 21:14:02 MST Print View

Tom,
I understand where you're coming from. It's a commonly sought place, especially these days. But... If you're looking for security you'd best have it between your ears, cause it doesn't exist anywhere else in this world.

P. P.
(toesnorth) - F

Locale: PNW
Re: "bear bags"/BUT on 02/12/2009 21:40:42 MST Print View

That doesn't mean that you should disregard the knowledge and experience of the experts, does it?
You're young, you'll live forever, you rarely see bears, and you've hiked a few years so you know best. Right? Until you meet a bear that either has more experience than you or just doesn't give a ****. Right?

john braun
(Hitman) - F

Locale: West Florida
Bear Bags? on 02/12/2009 21:55:50 MST Print View

Okay, I've tried to follow this post, but I guess bulletin board ADD set in somewhere half through.

So if I put my food in small freezer bags and all the small freezer bags in a large freezer bag and put all of that in any old drysack, should that okay? Of course, my bag would be cabled or roped up a tree.

Particularly I'm concerned about hiking the North Carolina section of the AT.