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1.5oz wood stove
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Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
Re: 1.5oz wood stove on 12/17/2005 16:19:05 MST Print View

Ryan, thanks. I did try moving up from twigs (1/8-1/4 inch diameter) up to larger sticks (3/8-1/2 inch diameter). You're right they are the key to getting sustained heat.

But I think with the wind in my backyard today (always in Oklahoma) that a windscreen was the missing ingredient. I'll try again tomorrow.

Thanks.

Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
Re: 1.5oz wood stove on 12/18/2005 15:43:49 MST Print View

** Success **

OK. I fashioned a quick and dirty windscreen today and retested the little bitty wood stove. Using red oak twigs I built a fire and let the fire reduce to coals. Then I placed the SP Trek 900 pot with 16 oz. of cold water on the stove. I wrapped the windscreen around the windward side and started the test. At 3 minutes I added a few more sticks to the fire. I then forgot about it for a few minutes while I worked on another project. Checking the pot at 12 minutes the 16 oz. of water was at a rolling boil. The results are similar to my experience with a small alcohol stove like the Ion.




Photos work better when you use the right URL.

Edited by flyfast on 12/18/2005 21:30:05 MST.

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Re: 1.5oz wood stove on 12/18/2005 16:14:49 MST Print View

hey Phil,

glad to know my stove is a sucess :-)
I thought it would be.

Edited by ryanf on 12/19/2005 13:00:37 MST.

Mark Larson
(mlarson) - MLife

Locale: Southeast USA
Re: Re: Re: 1.5oz wood stove on 12/19/2005 08:46:35 MST Print View

Ryan, I hacked up a crude, cave-man version of your stove last night. It was my first wood stove cooking experience, and I had a good time with it.

I'm going to keep my eye out for other can sizes. I think something slightly shorter might work better for me. Something like a 12oz evaporated milk can, or a cut-down 10oz Campbell's soup can. Should be a fun project to play with this season. Thanks for sharing!
-Mark

Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
12 oz. evaporated milk can on 12/19/2005 09:16:19 MST Print View

Mark, you and I are thinking alike. I have a 12 oz. evaporated milk can that's my cutting and drilling prototype. Later this week I'll try it as a slightly shorter stove. It might work a bit better by shortening the height from coals to pot.

Also, I want to change my fabrication tecnhique. A drill bit makes a jagged edge on holes in the can. If we can improve the design some we can have our Scouts make their own personal stove. It's probably best if we don't combine the stoves with a practical first aid session.

I plan to take my first stove out for an overnight hike next week. It ought to be a near perfect winter stove for the Ozark Highlands Trail in AR.

Edited by flyfast on 12/19/2005 09:20:44 MST.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Thoughts on stove on 12/19/2005 10:08:02 MST Print View

Shorter is perfectly fine / great IF you're not trying to make an 'inverted down draft' style stove. The only downside is that it doesn't hold as much fuel all at once (not that big of an idea, IMO).

You might look at using a Unibit along with the drill for cleaner holes.




OR you can punch the 'bottom holes' with a church key can opener and use a hammer driven 'punch' for the top holes.

A hand-punch (Whitney is one brand name - think industrial grade paper hole puncher) for holes, but unless you get the extra big one, it's 'reach' down the sides of the can is limited.

Depending on the size of pots your boyscout troop uses, a shortened coffee can may work better (and still nest)


R Alsborg
(FastWalker) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Re: Thoughts on stove on 12/19/2005 11:52:45 MST Print View

The Unibit is the best thing since slice bread…

They come in varous sizes, easy to use and give clean and profesional results.

Should be included in everyones tool box


Regards,

Edited by FastWalker on 12/19/2005 11:53:19 MST.

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Re: Thoughts on stove on 12/19/2005 13:15:55 MST Print View

Phil,
before making my mini swansons wood stove, I made a very similar design out of a progresso soup can. this stove is slightly wider and I can actually nest my chicken broth can inside. Any way my point is that you dont need to use a drill, the nice round holes from the unibit are better looking, but on my first stove I made the holes square by using a utility knife. It is not quite as nice looking but it works the same and I doubt your scouts will care :-)

also, have you had your scouts make alcohol stoves, I like these and is my favorite type of backpacking stove, all you need to convince them is that freeze dried food tastes good.

Edited by ryanf on 12/19/2005 13:19:12 MST.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Re: Re: Thoughts on stove on 12/19/2005 14:39:23 MST Print View

all you need to convince them is that freeze dried food tastes good.

I wouldn't bother trying to convince anyone that freeze dried meals taste even OK! Not when there are so many tasty and more affordable make your own alternatives.

Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
Re: 1.5oz wood stove on 12/19/2005 14:45:54 MST Print View

Thanks Ryan and Jim, at the risk of being seriously off topic for this thread, we will also introduce some alternative 1-pot dinners for our next backpacking theme month in the troop. One of my goals is to help the troop really improve its backpacking skills. It's a lot of small steps -- less stuff, better camping skills, lighter gear, smarter food, etc. -- all as a balanced approach to backpacking and life.
Thanks,
Phil

Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
Unibit on 12/21/2005 07:40:30 MST Print View

Roger, thanks for the tip on a unibit. That is a pretty expensive little tool, $25 and up at the local hardware store. As seldom as I'll make holes in sheet metal or cans I will stick with a center punch, a church key, or a plain drill bit. But a unibit looks like a great solution.

R Alsborg
(FastWalker) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Re: Unibit Alternative on 12/21/2005 14:50:28 MST Print View

Phil Barton

An alternative to the overpriced Unibit is Harbor Tool & Freight ‘s Titanium Nitride Coated High Speed Step Drills. They come in a 3pc-pack of assorted sizes $19.99.

Regards

Edited by FastWalker on 12/21/2005 14:51:53 MST.

Phil Barton
(flyfast) - MLife

Locale: Oklahoma
Re: Unibit alternative on 12/21/2005 15:30:58 MST Print View

Roger, thanks for the link. That looks identical to the 3 pc. bit set I saw last night at Home Depot for $50.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Re: Re: Unibit Alternative on 12/22/2005 07:19:42 MST Print View

Nice find roger! Thanks!