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41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister
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Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister on 01/17/2009 13:22:37 MST Print View

This is my latest project, it is a 41.6 gram (1.47 ounces) stove and canister, I call it the “Day Tripper”

Day tripper Stove

I have had this idea for a few years now but could not find the right canister until recently.

The stove is my SUUL liquid feed stove with an adaptor that holds a small canister, the canister holds 18 ml (10.8 grams) of Butane.

Initial tests show that with 10.8g of Butane fuel, it will boil about 0.8 liters of water, this is enough water for two cups of tea.

With the canister full of fuel the total weight of the Day Tripper is 52.4g (1.85 ounces), this weight is comparable to any of the UL alcohol stoves with fuel and fuel container to boil 0.8l of water.

The Day Tripper is still in the development stage and will be improved and hopefully made a bit lighter.

Weights
Stove, 16.7g
Canister stand, 1.6g (still needs some development)
Canister adaptor and clip, 5.4g (still needs some development)
Empty canister with no wrapping 17.8g

With the SUUL stove I can now use the STD Lindal valve screw canisters, Coleman Max canisters and I have a seletion of different size Butane canisters that I will make adaptors for.

Cigarette Lighter 18 ml Butane gas refill canister
Little Butane canister, holds 18 ml of Butane
day tripper in 550 pot
Canister and stove fits into a BPL 550 pot

Edited by tbeasley on 01/17/2009 13:23:50 MST.

Christopher Mills
(Hiker816) - MLife

Locale: Denver
Re: 41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister on 01/17/2009 14:40:14 MST Print View

Wow! That's just amazing. What's the gas canister made of?

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: Re: 41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister on 01/17/2009 17:30:20 MST Print View

hi Christopher,

the gas canister is made from some sort of plastic.

Tony

Unknown abc
(edude) - F
RE:"41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister" on 01/17/2009 17:37:25 MST Print View

Wow! Thats an amazing stove.
Will it burn alcohol too, or just butane?

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: RE:"41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister" on 01/17/2009 18:00:55 MST Print View

Won't burn alcohol.
Will burn butane &/or propane.

Unknown abc
(edude) - F
"41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister" on 01/17/2009 18:23:59 MST Print View

do you have to pump to create pressure?

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: "41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister" on 01/17/2009 18:50:41 MST Print View

Hi Evan,

>do you have to pump to create pressure?

No Butane boils at -5C and above that temperature it creates its own pressure, even though Butane is not suitable for very cold temps the canister is small enough to keep in a pocket to keep in warm.

Tony

Edited by tbeasley on 01/17/2009 22:24:33 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: "41.6g (1.47oz) Stove and Canister" on 01/17/2009 21:51:45 MST Print View

Butane boils at -0.5 C and above that temperature it creates its own pressure

Cheers

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
I like it. on 04/11/2010 21:23:11 MDT Print View

I think there's some future in the overall design.

How does it scale though? Is it a single shot stove only or is there some prospect for longer trips?

Would love to see ISO butane canisters in this tubular format, say various sizes. It looks much more efficient then the typical 8oz or 4oz wide concave bottom canisters.

Not sure I completely get the science nor practicality of using regular old butane from typical lighter refill canisters. However they are common enough in gas stations and such that it's an idea that has some potential.

What I'm starting to see is the stoves themselves are getting so light that one might carry multiple stoves, i.e. ISO butane, supercat stove, wood stove and use them as fuel sources allow. It is after all the fuel that takes up 99% of the space and weight.

That said I've been using stoves in tandem

1) wood + alcohol (wood as primary, alcohol just for quick cooking or when a wood fire can't be made)

2) ISO butane + alcohol (alcohol as a backup when canister runs out)

3) wood + ISO butane (you can use the ISO butane as primary and wood as backup or wood as primary with ISO only for when in a hurry or when you can't make a fire)

4) whitegas + wood (great winter combination)

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: I like it. on 04/11/2010 22:47:14 MDT Print View

Hi MM

>How does it scale though? Is it a single shot stove only or is there some prospect for longer trips?

Would love to see ISO butane canisters in this tubular format, say various sizes. It looks much more efficient then the typical 8oz or 4oz wide concave bottom canisters.

The idea was put as a concept for a day trip stove, the butane canister was the smallest that I could find that could hold enough fuel to bail two cups of tea, for longer trips I have adapters to fit the Coleman max canisters and the STD lindal valve canisters, there is potential to use a 450g canister.

Tony

Edited by tbeasley on 04/11/2010 22:48:16 MDT.

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
iso-butane canister on 04/12/2010 05:01:39 MDT Print View

Tony

The Braun CT1 'energy cell' contains 25ml of iso-butane, these are used in hair-stylers, might be what you're after?

S

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
Re: butane canister on 01/10/2012 08:40:26 MST Print View

Tony

Here is an alternative cannister. It is made from aluminium apart from the valve which is the standard threaded Lindal type and it holds 50g butane. Not sure if you can get them in Oz.

50g gas cannister

Chris Muthig
(cmuthig) - M

Locale: Georgia
So great on 01/10/2012 08:57:57 MST Print View

This is a fantastic creation you've come up with. I rarely go on day trips, but I know my dad does and would love something like this. Even not day tripping much, I would still love to make something like this.

What was the cost of making such a device?

Also, I have very little experience with butane stoves, so some education on how you went about making it would be exciting. (unless you hope to one day bring it to market, in which case I understand).

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: So great on 01/10/2012 09:12:49 MST Print View

The power cells for cordless nail guns might also work. Never tried them though.

Edited by jamesdmarco on 01/10/2012 09:14:46 MST.

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: Re: butane canister on 01/11/2012 01:14:25 MST Print View

Hi Stuart,

>Here is an alternative cannister. It is made from aluminium apart from the valve which is the standard threaded Lindal type and it holds 50g butane. Not sure if you can get them in Oz.

Thanks for the info on the 50g Go Systems Butane canister, I have not seen them here in Australia, I will have a search for thm, I have played around with similar size canisters from other applications.

Tony

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: So great on 01/11/2012 01:27:56 MST Print View

Hi Chris,

>This is a fantastic creation you've come up with. I rarely go on day trips, but I know my dad does and would love something like this. Even not day tripping much, I would still love to make something like this.

What was the cost of making such a device?

Also, I have very little experience with butane stoves, so some education on how you went about making it would be exciting.

The cost of making this little stove was not that much for me as I have access to a lot of scrap aluminium, I also have a small supply of Titanium that I have collected over the years, the Ti pot supports are made from tent pegs. This stove took me over 50 hours to make.

To reproduce this stove you would need some metal working machines, like a lathe and mill plus a fair bit of experience, I am a qualified machinist with over forty years experience.

>(unless you hope to one day bring it to market, in which case I understand).

Sorry, this will never happen and if I ever did it would be very expensive, like in the hundreds of $.

Tony

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
propane canister on 01/14/2012 05:01:09 MST Print View

Hi Tony

Here is another that you may have better chance of finding: these canisters are used for inflating MTB tyres. Some use CO2 but this one is propane. You can see that the valve is threaded, but I do not know what the thread is.

40g propane canister

Alan Bradley
(ahbradley)
Why propane in Bike tyres? on 01/14/2012 05:43:59 MST Print View

Thats interesting: I am curious as to why people would but propane in bike tyres.

Could it encourage more care from other road users (by allowing an LPG hazard warning plate)? :)

Does it just make crashes more interesting? :)

Edited by ahbradley on 01/14/2012 05:51:21 MST.

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
Re: Why propane in Bike tyres? on 01/14/2012 09:18:08 MST Print View

It's just a quick way to inflate a tyre (mainly for those that do competitions)

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: Why propane in Bike tyres? on 01/14/2012 11:18:38 MST Print View

To add details to Suart's post:

Unlike air, propane is stored as a liquid at moderate pressure. At about 100 psi, a volume of stored liquid propane represents about 32 times the gas volume of 100 psi stored compressed air.

Propane would have a slight advantage of diffusing through the bike tire more slowly because it is a larger molcule than O2 or N2. And propane would not oxidize the tire as O2 does (ever so slightly, hence the move to N2 by some).

But it adds a bit more weight to the rim of the tires which is a worst place for weight.

But mostly, it lets you inflate your tires quickly from a small container.

But don't use it in cold weather and I'm not talking about -40! Or even the -26F at my house today. High pressure tires need 90 psi or more. 90 psig = 105 psia. You don't have that from propane until 60F (16C).