backpacking lanterns
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edward peacock
(mikepea) - F
backpacking lanterns on 11/26/2005 21:27:11 MST Print View

I'm new to the 'hood so please be somewhat kind.Ijust read the review about lanterns,mantleless vs mantle, and I gotta say I love my snowpeak lantern.I have never had an issue with mantles or globes. I just stick a couple of extra mantles in the bottom of the storage box with the lantern. I have packed this little sucker from coast to coast and from border to border logging thousands of miles and have yet to replace the globe(replaced mantle after UPSing gear to RMNP. mantle survived on rtn trip via UPS).If storage box is used and REASONABLE care is applied when packing it will endure, by the way my pack weight has NEVER exceeded 30lbs and most times it's a LOT less including the lantern. so, in my view the mantles and globe issue don't really amount to a great deal.plus the light output is awsome and fuel use is minimal

R Alsborg
(FastWalker) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Re: backpacking lanterns on 11/27/2005 00:51:29 MST Print View

Mike,

Welcome to the “BPL Hood” are you referring to the
Snow Peak Giga Power Lantern 4 oz’s without canister???

james solomon
(dralahiker) - F

Locale: Southeast USA
Re: backpacking lanterns on 11/28/2005 17:08:07 MST Print View

I've used a Primus canister lantern for years and been happy with it. Mantles have not been a problem, but carrying gas canisters sure is (FYI-I use lanterns only for sociable group camp trips, not hardcore B/Ping). There is a new super LED lantern out that got an excellent review, uses 4 AAs, and weighs 9.4 oz(maybe a hair less with Lithium batteries). The real kicker is the cost: $20. And it's at your local Target, in the Flashlight department, not Camping! I was skeptical too, but read this review and took the plunge. Great lantern, even at twice the price! River Rock LED Lantern

Edited by dralahiker on 11/28/2005 17:15:56 MST.

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: backpacking lanterns on 11/28/2005 20:32:26 MST Print View

I like this little guy, but don't know whether it perfoms any better than the snowpeak. Being clumsy, the mesh globe is the way to go for me.

http://www.primus.se/EN/products/prd_p2_221383.html

It's strictly a wintertime indulgence--long nights, you know!

Mike Barney
(eaglemb) - F

Locale: AZ, the Great Southwest!
Re: Re: backpacking lanterns on 11/28/2005 22:43:41 MST Print View

I've also had a Primus (2245), 9 oz. It's inexpensive compared to some of the other lanterns, and the construction of the mantle assembly makes it solid for rough handling without breaking the mantles. We needed more light output, getting another lantern was an option, but we found three simple modifications (mantles, overboring, regulator tweaking) that roughly doubled the luminance, it's REEEEEL bright now.

If you're interested in the specifics, I can post them. (Doing so at your own risk)

Most of the weight is in a single large casting, so it appears to be a candidate for a grinder based diet. If anyone has any experience in this area, I'd be very interested.

Mike

Mike Storesund
(mikes) - F
Backpacking Lantern - Brunton Liberty on 11/29/2005 05:50:40 MST Print View

I have had the Brunton Liberty for a year now, and like the ratings in the review posted on this site, it scores a little low. I think the idea of a mantleless lantern is a good idea, but the performance is something to be desired.
The air adjustment takes a little getting use to, but once you got the globe warmed up and glowing red, adjusting the intake makes it bright enough.
IMHO, there is a potential fire hazard with the open glowing globe, so I would use extreme caution if there is any wind and gear is in proximity. This item is definitely something to set aside and let cool off. When you turn it off, you will see the entire globe and protective bars glowing red for some time after.
It's a cool toy for those that "have to have all the gadgets" (like me), if you want some heat with your light that works too. However, for the money and the amount of light you get from it, my trusty Petzl headlamp works just as well for me.

Edited by mikes on 11/29/2005 05:52:19 MST.

Mike Barney
(eaglemb) - F

Locale: AZ, the Great Southwest!
Re: Re: backpacking lanterns on 11/29/2005 07:57:34 MST Print View

I've also had a Primus (2245), 9 oz. It's inexpensive compared to some of the other lanterns, and the construction of the mantle assembly makes it solid for rough handling without breaking the mantles. We needed more light output, getting another lantern was an option, but we found three simple modifications (mantles, overboring, regulator tweaking) that roughly doubled the luminance, it's REEEEEL bright now.

If you're interested in the specifics, I can post them. (Doing so at your own risk)

Most of the weight is in a single large casting, so it appears to be a candidate for a grinder based diet. If anyone has any experience in this area, I'd be very interested.

Mike