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SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves
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Carol Corbridge
(ccorbridge) - F

Locale: Southern Oregon
SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves on 11/25/2005 21:45:31 MST Print View

Anybody have any experience with these gloves? I'm thinking of using them over possum down gloves for extra warmth and waterproofness. I've bought many pairs of gloves over the years to try to keep my cold blooded hands warm and dry.

What do you think of these? What do they weigh?

Edited by ccorbridge on 11/26/2005 08:57:58 MST.

douglas ray
(Dray)

Locale: Olympic Peninsula
Sealskinz on 11/26/2005 18:49:53 MST Print View

Although I've had good experiances with sealskinz socks, when I tried the gloves I was sorely disappointed. They weren't waterproof at all, for that matter they soaked up so much water I would take them off and wring them oute every hour or so. Maby I just got a bad pair?

David Bonn
(david_bonn) - F

Locale: North Cascades
Re: SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves on 11/26/2005 22:18:07 MST Print View

Sealskinz act more as a vapor barrier so your hands will usually end up being quite soaked from sweat as much as anything.

If you want to go the vapor barrier route, using a pair of latex gloves (like the ones medical people use) INSIDE of any other gloves or mittens will generate toasty hands pretty quickly. You should also be able to figure out if this is a route worth exploring for a very small investment of money and carry weight. I carry latex gloves in my first aid kit anyway so I also have them as an emergency inner glove too.

Keep in mind that thick gloves aren't necessarily warmer than thin gloves, too. Windproofness, how much water they can absorb, and even radiant heat loss from a larger surface area on thicker gloves can be factors.

If you are going out in the winter, you ought to have mittens and overmitts too. Even if you don't like them or find them awkward, your hands will most likely be warmer in them than in gloves. The combination of liner gloves, fleece mittens, and waterproof/breathable overmitts is hard to beat.

Make sure any gloves or mittens you have aren't too tight.

Make sure you have a warm hat. More specifically, if your core temperature isn't being adequately maintained, your body will compensate by restricting blood flow to extremities like your hands and feet.

Carol Corbridge
(ccorbridge) - F

Locale: Southern Oregon
Re: Re: SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves on 11/27/2005 12:19:04 MST Print View

Good ideas all and I don't know why I didn't think of the latex glove thing. I have some I use for gardening and will give them a try.

Andy Ledbetter
(dronfield) - F
Re: SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves on 11/28/2005 06:05:38 MST Print View

You will need to wear the SealSkinz as the inner layer. SealSkinz do breath remarkable well if used correctly. See the web site www.sealskinz.com for an explanation of Hydrophilic membranes.

larry savage
(pyeyo) - F

Locale: pacific northwest
Re: Re: SealSkinz Waterproof Gloves on 11/28/2005 20:21:36 MST Print View

If you want to try an alternative to sealskin take a look at nrs's neoprene line,from 1.5mm to 3.5mm. They also offer a mitt which is warmer then a glove. Just make sure you use a poly liner with neoprene. The other option I like is lobster or split-finger mitts, these can be found at performance bike or a cross-country ski shop.nrs can be foubnd at www.nrsweb.com.If you still can't solve your cold hands you may want to try crazy creeks thermabands, mini heat warmers that keep your blood vessals from constricting. I have a friend with raynaud's syndrome that uses these.

Edited by pyeyo on 11/29/2005 17:37:50 MST.

Ronnie Cusmano
(ronnie1107) - F

Locale: Northeast
Re: Sealskinz on 03/19/2006 13:27:29 MST Print View

I have had a similar experience.

Daniel Schmidt
(dschmidt) - F
sealskinz on 03/20/2006 08:08:21 MST Print View

I bike all winter in Portland, OR in the rain wearing the gloves/socks. My main gripe is that once they are wet, they take forever to dry out and start to stink.
I wouldn't say they don't breathe, but expect clamminess in sustained activity.
I am looking for better options for gloves/socks in a wet cold climate.