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Down Quilt and dry sack
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Nicholas Miller
(nmiller08) - F

Locale: Montana
Down Quilt and dry sack on 11/29/2008 17:37:16 MST Print View

Finished my first MYOG project: down quilt and stuff sack with makeshift drysack closure.
quilt
foot drawstring
dry sack
dry sack bottom
dry sack top

Edited by nmiller08 on 11/29/2008 17:38:12 MST.

Nicholas Miller
(nmiller08) - F

Locale: Montana
quilt on 11/29/2008 17:56:55 MST Print View

So the quilt had just come out of the sack, hence the crumpled-ness. I'm pretty happy with how it turned out. Originally I was going to do a permanent baffled circular footbox but after trying to design it and all it's dimensions (accounting for loft of the quilt by making the inner disc of the footpiece 4" smaller diameter, adjusting the lengths of the top and bottom quilt fabric at the foot end, joining the two together, etc.) I decided to just go with a drawstring closure. I haven't made a draft stopper yet, as I'm only going to use it inside/on top of my winter bag for super cold camping for now. When next summer approaches I'll add some things such as pad straps, draft stopper, etc. The drawstring closure is shown, the knot is just a placeholder for now.

I also included some pictures of my makeshift dry sack, I just used silnylon and sealed it. For the top to keep the package light I just used a ring of grosgrain with small 1/2 inch side lock buckle. My problem is that the grosgrain isn't quite stiff enough to roll down well. Anyone have ideas or done this in the past? I found some stiff 1/2 plastic at the local fabric store, the box had a picture of a corset on it, so I'm guessing it's used as some sort of structural support for fabrics, maybe I'll sew a piece of that inside next time I try a dry sack. Also, I need a strap on the bottom. With the seams sealed pulling the quilt out creates a vacuum and makes separating it from the stuff sack difficult without anything to hold onto on the sack. Again, if anyone has tips in this regard I'd love to hear them.

Oh yeah, quilt is 46" at the top, 36" at the foot, with varied baffling thickness. Before stuffing it, I measured the loft, it goes pretty steadily up from 2 1/4" at the foot to 3" at the top :) toasty insulation for only 16.5 oz measured weight (with seam sealed dry sack, but without straps, hardware, or other future additions). Special thanks to Mikeinfhaz's posts on hammockforum and Jonathan Duckett for the great references.

p.s. for anyone looking for sources of materials like I was, I got all the fabric, netting, etc from Quest Outfitters. Black is 1.1oz silnylon (2nds) and blue is 1.1 uncoated ripstop. Down is from from Speer Hammocks (advertised as 900 fill power, but certification shows 927 c.i. with 5-10% variability which seems like this would put it at 835 minimum fill power). Both suppliers were fast and excellent service/assistance.

Edited by nmiller08 on 11/29/2008 18:06:22 MST.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Down Quilt and dry sack on 11/30/2008 13:40:24 MST Print View

Nicholas,

I hope you enjoy your quilt!

You have one professional-looking piece of gear on your hands.

Todd

te - wa
(mikeinfhaz) - F

Locale: Phoenix
Re: Re: Down Quilt and dry sack on 11/30/2008 16:35:04 MST Print View

sweet
glad i could help

Nicholas Miller
(nmiller08) - F

Locale: Montana
stiff upper lip on 11/30/2008 17:07:13 MST Print View

So that stuff at the fabric store is called "boning." It comes in various configurations, some is fabric covered some not, different sizes, etc. I might buy some to try another dry sack top that's easier to roll down. I'll post the results if it works out! (or if it doesn't)

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
dry bag closures on 12/01/2008 16:48:01 MST Print View

Nicholas,

Congats on the quilt. It looks great. I've made the same type of stuff sacks with the dry bag style closures. I found some of the plastic sheeting at the fabric store and used it at the top inside of where your gros grain strap goes. You can do either one piece on one side, or 2 pieces (one for each side). Make sure to round the corners of the plastic strip ends just slightly, as once you have sewn it inside, the sharp corners can poke through the sil. I put plastic strips in first and then attach the gro grain. The plastic is fairly thin and the sewing needle goes right through. If you sew through the plastic, try to stay a little farther from the edge and more toward the middle, as it will leave a perforation that can compromise the plastic. Hope that makes sense. Good luck!

Nicholas Miller
(nmiller08) - F

Locale: Montana
thanks! on 12/01/2008 22:02:37 MST Print View

That's interesting, I was wondering about sewing through the plastic, I bought some of the boning with the idea to sew it into a little sleeve at the top of the sack, a la making a drawstring channel but sewing the plastic strip completely in. Have you tried that approach? It seems like it might be prone to twisting or spinning inside the channel, but maybe you could combine the two methods by sewing it into a space, then tacking it down on the ends to avoid perforating the whole length of the strip. Good call on rounding the edges too, especially with lightweight fabric.
p.s. thanks Todd! look forward to trying out the quilt.

Edited by nmiller08 on 12/01/2008 22:05:05 MST.

Randall Miller
(speyguy) - F

Locale: Cascadia
dry bag closures on 12/02/2008 19:04:12 MST Print View

I thought about the same method of making the channels for the plastic first, so as to not compromise it with the perforations. But, I wanted the plastic to be the same width as the gros grain ribbon so it would fold nice and tidy and in order to do that you would need to attach the gros grain before making the channel, at least in my way of thinking, and that seemed more complicated to me. Sewing through the plastic has worked fine so far.

Here are some photos of my quilt……
http://picasaweb.google.com/speyguy/QuiltPhotos?authkey=v2_3AZs3b-A#