Forum Index » GEAR » Locating Ultralight Pack ?


Display Avatars Sort By:
Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 16:38:15 MST Print View

Good evening everyone. New to the forum and I am in need of some help. Some time ago, in my endless surfing for lightweight gear, I saw a pack that was basically a stuff sack with shoulder straps. I recall it was very light; maybe even lighter than a G6. Can someone point me in the correct direction?

Thanks

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 16:44:11 MST Print View

perhaps this is what you saw?

ID silcoat sack pack

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 17:26:34 MST Print View

Thanks Paul. That is the one. Do you by chance know the physical dimensions of the pack? All of the retailers and IG list is the volume.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 17:39:27 MST Print View

Thanks Paul. That is the one. Do you by chance know the physical dimensions of the pack? All of the retailers and IG list is the volume.

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 17:40:48 MST Print View

check out the reveiw on this site

Silicoat Backpack Reveiw

it looks like if you remove the hipbelt you can get the pack to weigh 3.5oz and if you replace the soulder straps you can get it to be even lighter, but if you are going to do that I recomend just buying a u.l. stuff sack and making your own pack

Edited by ryanf on 11/14/2005 17:48:37 MST.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/14/2005 19:23:50 MST Print View

Thanks for the link Ryan. It would seem that using a dry pack would be most effective.

My interest is building something inexpensive for this project. What is the best source for shoulder straps? Make your own (I dont have access to a sewing machine at this time), or sourcing shoulder straps from a poor defenseless donor pack? :)

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 02:14:44 MST Print View

Michael, sorry to be so long in getting back, was "off-line". sorry, i don't know the dimensions.

David Wiesenfeld
(davidwiesenfeld) - F
Shoulder Straps on 11/15/2005 08:04:04 MST Print View

Thru-hiker.com has pre-made shoulder straps here for $10:
http://www.thru-hiker.com/MaterialDetail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=mg153&subcat=Hardware

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Shoulder Straps on 11/15/2005 13:13:07 MST Print View

you could just use some webbing straps, thats all integral designs used for the silicoat pack :-)

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Shoulder Straps on 11/15/2005 14:47:41 MST Print View

Here's something that has intrigued me for a while-- once you get below the ten pound mark, why not use a design more like a duffle or messenger bag-- eliminating one strap completely? Ray Jardine wrote of carrying his pack on just one shoulder most of the time. It could open up other designs with the pack oriented horizontally rather than vertically.

Something I haven't come across in the UL designs is a variation on the old bed roll: if you have all that fabric for a sleeping bag, why add the pack? A simple strap system with your goodies rolled up in the sleeping bag would be uber minimalist. With a poncho, it could go under the raingear to keep it dry.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Shoulder Straps on 11/15/2005 15:28:28 MST Print View

Thanks David; definately a viable option.

I also thought about taking the super thin straps off of a camelback "biker" model (not sure if this is still the model name) and adapt to my homemade pack. This would add to the overall cost though. I might have to stick with the thru-hiker straps or find a cheap donor pack.

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Shoulder Straps? We don't need no stinkin shoulder straps! on 11/15/2005 15:38:36 MST Print View

I doubt she said it quite like that but If the load is light enough you could always go Grandma Gatewood style:



Or back to Dale's single strap idea ... I've hiked many a mile with day hike stuff (first aid, rain gear, snack, navigation) packed in a medium sized old Caribou fanny pack carried "bandolier style" with the strap passing over one shoulder and under the other arm.

Not having access to a sewing machine, I think your lowest cost MYOG solution might be to buy a pre-made silnylon stuff sack (example: $12 for 12 liter size, $14 for 25 liter at golite) and then hand sew a single 1.25 inch strap down one side. Add a ladder buckle and you're in business. good multi-use possibilities too.

Edited by jcolten on 11/15/2005 16:05:03 MST.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 15:47:05 MST Print View

http://www.rei.com/product/47971644.htm

I did find this dry sack at REI. $15 cheaper than the ID; but completely waterproof at 7.4 oz. Wrong direction in weight but greater capability.

Hmmmmmm ...

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Ultralight Dry Sacks on 11/15/2005 15:51:43 MST Print View

Hmmmmmmm...

if you are looking for fully waterproof, then look no further my freind

Sea to Summit ultra sil Dry sacks

Some (not all) of these dry sacks are avalible at REI

all are avalible at Travel Country

Edited by ryanf on 11/15/2005 16:00:14 MST.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Shoulder Straps? We don't need no stinkin shoulder straps! on 11/15/2005 16:01:02 MST Print View

Grandma Gatewood crossed my mind as I wrote the message. Talk about less is more.

I like to carry a fanny pack that way-- I have too much belly and too little fanny-- or I guess you could say I taper the wrong direction. I have an Ex Officio fanny pack that I picked up in a thrift store that is essentially a long tube with a zipper down the side. I carry all my essentials in that and it works well bandolier style. Packs, what packs? WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN' PACKS :)

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 16:04:34 MST Print View

when sizing any of the available stuff sacks, is a 20" x 10" sack capable of holding a 20" tall foam pad; ie accounting for wrap-around of the contents?

Or is this a length when the sack is empty/flat?

I never thought this was going to require so much research, LOL.

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 16:08:21 MST Print View

it is probably flat. I bought a dry sack once for my sleeping bag with the right mesurements. I could fit the bag in but there was no space to roll it up so I ended up not being able to use it. if you want a sack for a pad then you will have to find one with a 25" or 26" length, good luck :-)>

Edited by ryanf on 11/15/2005 16:09:16 MST.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 16:12:27 MST Print View

Thanks Ryan. I had assume exact length.

Re-searching begins again.

Michael Freyman
(mfreyman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 18:24:09 MST Print View

somewhat off my origonal topic, but:

nice, low cost day pack here:
http://www.rei.com/product/47856735.htm

maybe others had seen this before.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Locating Ultralight Pack ? on 11/15/2005 23:55:43 MST Print View

The Exped dry pack is a little heavy but the design might get your creative juices goin': http://www.backpacker.com/article/1,2646,7750,00.html