online resources for bivy camping?
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Huzefa Siamwala
(huzefa) - M
online resources for bivy camping? on 07/26/2008 22:29:59 MDT Print View

I am looking for some good blogs, articles, forums etc dedicated to bivy camping.

Anyone knows of any such resouces?

Huzefa Siamwala
(huzefa) - M
online resources for bivy camping? on 08/19/2008 02:58:16 MDT Print View

bump..

Chris Jones
(NightMarcher) - F
Ronald Turnbull on 08/19/2008 03:15:53 MDT Print View

Do a search for Ronald Turnbull...

Huzefa Siamwala
(huzefa) - M
Re: Ronald Turnbull on 08/19/2008 05:43:26 MDT Print View

Chris, thank you so much!

Peter Macfarlane
(ptc) - F

Locale: The Scottish Highlands
Born Again Bivyer on 08/19/2008 15:58:15 MDT Print View

I'm still finding my feet again, but after a huge gap (last time was the '70s), I started bivying again this year.
I'm still learning how to live without a tent, but there's some trip reports on my blog at www.petesy.co.uk

Huzefa Siamwala
(huzefa) - M
Re: Born Again Bivyer on 08/21/2008 09:07:42 MDT Print View

Thanks Peter. Looking forward to reading your trip reports.

John Carter
(jcarter1)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Born Again Bivyer on 08/21/2008 13:31:45 MDT Print View

Peter,

I remember looking closely at the Three Wire Bivy when it came out, and your blog is making me reconsider. My hiking style is very similar to yours; I'm in a very rainy climate, and I prefer solo backpacking above treeline. I'd rather risk high winds and rain for the chance at a spectacular sunset/sunrise than to dip down below treeline and lose all views. Most of my trips are 1-2 nights. Unlike you, I never eat in my tent (black bear problems), so that's not a concern for me.

I am trying to decide whether to get this bivy or the Integral Designs eVent Overbag. The Overbag is 10oz lighter, and I can cinch down the opening to expose only my face, which should improve condensation issues vs. the Three Wire. If it begins to rain, I can simply turn the bivy on its side, or throw over my rain jacket. Or I could bring a small tarp and still be lighter than the Three Wire.

However, the Three Wire is simpler to set up than a bivy/tarp combo, and the Three Wire has built in netting. I'm a big fan of simplicity.
So my questions for you are as follows:

For a simple overnighter, do you find that you miss the ability to sit upright under a shelter? Do you miss an overheard shelter during the day that a small tarp could provide?

With the bag zipped open and the bug netting shut, is it reasonably comfortable? For example, if I wanted to take an afternoon nap in the shade and be protected under the bug netting, would I feel much of a breeze?

Lastly, if you remove the stakes, can you sit upright and still have the head area cover you? In other words, If I wanted to get out in the rain, could I first sit upright, then use the awning to help keep rain out as I exit?

Basically, I am trying to decide between the versatility of the Overbag + tarp / mosquito net vs. the simplicity and ease of setup of the Three WIre. I am hesitant to take the Three Wire and a tarp, because this would be heavier than my huge GoLite Hex 3 with bug netting.

One last question: with the Terra Nova Laser Competition as light as the Three Wire, I am curious why you have tried bivying again?

Thanks in advance.

Edited by jcarter1 on 08/21/2008 13:32:40 MDT.

Diplomatic Mike
(MikefaeDundee)

Locale: Under a bush in Scotland
Re Born again bivvyer on 08/21/2008 14:00:16 MDT Print View

Hi John.
I'll give the ID All e-Vent overbag a 10 out of 10. I bought it partly on the recommendation of a forum member from your neck of the woods, David Ure.
I've never had any condensation in it. The fabric is superb! I like the fact that it is all e-Vent. If i roll over at night, there is no unbreathable fabric to end up on top of me. I use a tarp with it, as in Scotlands rainy climate, i like a dry space for getting in and out, and cooking. If the weather is good, the tarp might stay in the bag, but i like to have one with me. The small tarp/bivvy bag combo is a good forecast combo only, for me anyway.
For the weight of the 3-wire, you could use a Titanium Goat bivvy with your Hex 3. I use both, for more unsettled weather.

John Carter
(jcarter1)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re Born again bivvyer on 08/21/2008 14:07:58 MDT Print View

Thanks Mike for the helpful comments.

Chris Jones
(NightMarcher) - F
ID e-Vent overbag vs. biting insects on 08/21/2008 17:50:16 MDT Print View

Mike,

When using your ID e-Vent overbag, how do you deal with biting insects such as mosquitoes and midges?

Michael Wands
(walksoftly) - F

Locale: Piney Woods
Bivy Camping - John Carter on 08/21/2008 17:57:13 MDT Print View

John,

I have a regular-sized Montbell sleeping bag cover that comes in at just over 6 ozs. It has sealed seams and is waterproof except for the opening around your face. It does require a ground sheet as it is not bomb-proof. With some netting from GG it is a great, breathable shelter. When it rains I turn over and cover up my head with a WB rain jacket. I am small enough that I can zip the jacket and not worry about tossing it off during the night. Rain is only a problem in that it is LOUD when your shelter is so close to you ears!

Much talk about how to get into a bivy when it is raining. I use a small umbrella.

Diplomatic Mike
(MikefaeDundee)

Locale: Under a bush in Scotland
Bivvy camping on 08/22/2008 09:12:01 MDT Print View

Chris.
I use a MLD bug-bivvy and a full size tarp during midge/bug season, usually June - Sept. I don't like sleeping with my head in a bug-net. I use the ID bivvy the rest of the year.
If i'm camping high in an exposed or windy area during midge/bug season, i usually use my Terra Nova Laserlite tent.
I'm lucky enough to live a short drive from the mountains, and pick my shelter to suit the conditions at the time.

John Carter
(jcarter1)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Bivy Camping - John Carter on 08/22/2008 11:12:29 MDT Print View

I've looked closely at the Montbell Breeze as well, and it's certainly tempting. One advantage of the Integral designs and especially the Big Agnes is the ability to store gear in the head area. Still, 6-8oz for a wp/b bivy is tempting.

Here's where I'm currently leaning:

Montbell bivy long and wide (8.3oz)
Six Moon Designs Serentiy NetTent (7.7oz)
Six Moon Designs Gatewood Cape (12oz)

There is definitely some redundancy here, but also some real versatility and safety. Most importantly, it most closely mimics a double-wall shelter (bug free living space, fully enclosed fly, a waterproof outer (cape) and breathable inner (bivy)), with the added protection of a wp/b bivy in the event of tent failure. And though it adds up to 28oz (the weight of the Terra Nova), I am able to save significant weight by replacing my eVent rain jacket (11.3oz) with a Tyvek jacket (3.5oz) and removing my pack cover (2oz). Therefore the net weight of this sleep system vs. any other system I would consider is only 18.2oz.

I get added versatiliy and improved views, since I can use just the bivy most of the time, use just the bug tent for lower elevations/afternoon naps, and have the Gatewood as my rainy weather backup/afternoon shade or to aid in condensation reduction.

The two disadvantages are that I loose my nice breathable eVent jacket and I loose some simplicity some of the time. Oh, and it's not freestanding. I'm not fully convinced, though, so your input is welcome!

Edited by jcarter1 on 08/22/2008 11:32:15 MDT.

Diplomatic Mike
(MikefaeDundee)

Locale: Under a bush in Scotland
Re Bivvying on 08/22/2008 11:30:49 MDT Print View

I think you have it about right John. There is no 'right' method of bivving. It involves compromises. Living close to where you hike enables you to choose the right gear more easily.
Bivvying in an area of dry settled weather, is totally different from bivvying in an area with a maritime climate!

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
A Tale of Two Bivy Shelters.... on 08/22/2008 13:08:44 MDT Print View

nm

Edited by FamilyGuy on 11/18/2013 14:16:13 MST.

John Carter
(jcarter1)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: A Tale of Two Bivy Shelters.... on 08/22/2008 14:50:05 MDT Print View

When you say the Unishelter has 40", is that along the zipper length, or do you get to open up the bivy 40"? My understanding is that there is more mesh on the BA Three wire. Also, do you have a weight for the bivy and pole?

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: A tale of two bivy shelters.... on 08/22/2008 15:24:55 MDT Print View

nm

Edited by FamilyGuy on 11/18/2013 19:12:06 MST.

Patrick Young
(lightingboy) - F

Locale: Southwest
re:BA3 Wire on 08/22/2008 16:11:55 MDT Print View

Mine weighs 28.3 oz for bivy and poles, no stakes or stuff sacks.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Bivies on 08/22/2008 16:31:55 MDT Print View

nm

Edited by FamilyGuy on 11/18/2013 19:12:38 MST.

Michael Wands
(walksoftly) - F

Locale: Piney Woods
"online resources for bivy camping?" on 08/22/2008 17:27:03 MDT Print View

John,

The two bivies pictured above are actual shelters where you can store gear and turn over inside the bivy. The Montbell is more of a sleeping bag cover and when you roll from your back to your side, the whole thing comes with you.

I tuck the front of mine under my arms with the hood behind me laying flat. It really does put you out there in the middle of nature. Not for the squeamish. On the other hand when you want to sit up you just sit up! Don't find it to be claustrophobic at all (we REALLY need spell check on this site!!!).

Just an observation. I have a cat that lives outdoors. We have gotten a lot of rain in North Texas over the last two weeks. When the cat comes home to eat he is almost perfectly dry. I like to think that he is nimble enough to run between the rain drops, but I'm sure that he just finds natural shelter to stay dry. With a bivy like the Montbell you have to do the same. Always on the lookout for natural shelter to keep you protected - not the best protection out in an open space.