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MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt
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Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 07/09/2008 20:32:22 MDT Print View

Here is my latest garage tinkering... This stuff is so much fun! It's similar to what others have posted here but I thought I'd detail the methods.

Specs:
Weight: Stove (5.4 ounces), Wire mesh pot support (0.9 ounces)

Burn details: Burns clean and leaves hardly any ash. Boil times and burn duration to be determined and posted at a later date.

Nests nicely in a Snow Peak 900 Titanium pot

Wire mesh pot support can be stored in between the pint and quart paint can when assembled.

Pictures:




Not sure if I'll use the beer can pot or my Snow Peak?



Here are the parts un-assembled:



Here is the stove sitting upright in a Snow Peak 900 Ti Pot:



This is a view of the bottom of the stove with the bottom of the quart can removed. The mesh pot stand can stored between these two cans:



Materials:
1 empty quart paint can from Home Depot
1 pint can (Minwax Pre Stain Wood Conditioner) emptied and cleaned
3”x3” wire mesh
JB Weld

Tools:
Side cutting can opener (safety opener)
Harbor Freight deep throat metal punch ($20 item number 91510)
Wire cutter
File

Process: (assembly time ~ 1 hour)
1) Open lids (discard).

2) Using the can opener cut the bottom of both the quart and pint paint cans.

3) Using the punch (with a 7/16 inch hole size) evenly space 10 holes 1 and 1/8th inches apart (~7/8 inches from edge to edge of each hole) around the bottom of the quart sized can. The center of the punched hole should be ~ 1 and 1/2 inches from the bottom of the can.

4) Using the punch (with a 7/16 inch hole size) evenly space 15 holes 11/16 inches apart (~1/4 inch from edge to edge of each hole) near the top of the pint sized can. The center of the punched hole should be ~ 3/4 inches from the top of the can.

5) Apply a small ribbon of JB weld around the inside opening of the quart sized can. Invert the pint sized can and insert its bottom into the quart size can. The bottom of the pint size can should fit snugly into the inside opening of the quart sized can.

6) Cut wire mesh to internal diameter of the now upside down pint paint can. Affix with JB Weld to the now bottom inside of the stove.

7) Retain the bottom of the quart sized can and use while burning to protect ground from scorching.

Edited by brianjbarnes on 07/10/2008 08:00:45 MDT.

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 07/09/2008 23:30:09 MDT Print View

Brian, this is a really nice looking stove you've put together. And not bad and the weight you've brought it in under as well. I'll be curious to hear some performance results as well. Thank you for sharing.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 07/10/2008 08:00:14 MDT Print View

Thanks Sam! I think I can get the weight down below 5 ounces for the stove by cutting the top ring of the pint size can and attaching the wire mesh directly to the side of the can rather than having it resting on the lid. On version 2 I may give that a try. I'm also not completely satisfied with wire mesh as a pot stand. I'm looking for a can that will fit between the inner and outer wall but will rest on top of the stove without much modification. I have an old Carlos V hot chocolate can that may fit the bill. Using this instead of the wire mesh will increase the weight a bit. My ultimate goal is to make this an easy project for scouts to make.

Edited by brianjbarnes on 07/10/2008 08:05:50 MDT.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Rust? on 07/10/2008 09:49:11 MDT Print View

Okay, so I feel like this is a stupid question. Apparently I'm one of two people on this site who doesn't have experience w/wood stoves! :P I've noticed that everyone uses steel. Obviously easy access, cheap. Unless one were to buy the BushBuddy, which I'll admit I've been considering--in which case it's an expensive bit of steel. Bottom line, my question is "Don't these rust out relatively soon?" It seems like I see rusted-out steel that's been involved with fire all the time--which I guess is my convoluted way of saying my charcoal chimney starter and old grills seem to get pretty rusty. Is this a valid concern or moot point? Does the rusting happen just from the effects of heat and environmental humidity? If I drop $140 on a bushbuddy, would it be rusted out in a year?

Thanks for posting!
Brad

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE:"MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 07/10/2008 10:29:37 MDT Print View

Brad - This is my first experience with a steel wood stove. I assume it would rust eventually. Not sure how soon? However, it takes little time, money, and effort to make another one. As for the bushbuddy I'll wait for others to comment on its longevity as I do not have one. Though, the bushbuddy is made of stainless steel which should improve its durability.

J Thomas Peterson
(tpeterson1959) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Re: MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 07/10/2008 10:37:25 MDT Print View

The stove looks great and the instructions are well written! Thanks!

Your instructions are going to help me assemble some cans that I found on the hispanic foods aisle - an ancho chile can and I think a salsa can that fit nicely together and should make for a very compact WG stove. I haven't been able to test it yet, but it may not hold enough fuel for a good burn time and it may not be tall enough to provide a good down draft, but I'm thinking that may be mitigated with the number and placement of holes.

When I finally get it done, I'll post the results.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Rust? on 07/12/2008 12:15:06 MDT Print View

Brad,

I believe the BB is built of stainless steel. I've got a BB Ultra and there's no rust. Good thing too, at that price.

I built a BB knock off, using a tomato soup can and a blueberry pie filling can. My version does not come apart, or have a screen in the fire box; just punched holes for primary air.

I just weighed it at 4.16 ounces. The problem with mine is the tuna can pot stand doesn't nest. I have some 1/2" SS mesh that might work if I can squeeze it enough to fit inside the stove for storage.

BB knockoff with BPL SUL-1100 pot

BB knockoff Top View

BB knockoff with BPL SUL-1100 pot

The bad news is that it's too tall to nest in any of my pots.

Edited by redleader on 07/12/2008 12:18:54 MDT.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
stainless on 07/12/2008 13:01:17 MDT Print View

Yeah, Dennis-thanks. It was a stupid question; if I'd only opened my eyes a bit more before typing...

Good news is, both of your stoves look great!

John Kays
(johnk) - M

Locale: SoCal
BB Nesting on 07/12/2008 13:31:49 MDT Print View

Denis,

The BBU needs a nest to protect it from being crushed in the pack but your homebuilt is appears to be sturdy enough to nest a lightweight Ti cup or mug. Nice Job.

Brad,

As you can see, this BBU is rust free after 15 months of frequent use:

Edited by johnk on 07/12/2008 23:30:55 MDT.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: BB Nesting on 07/12/2008 20:31:40 MDT Print View

John,

That's one honkin' big picture you posted.

Re my stoves toughness: It seems pretty solid. I believe I could carry it safely in a stuff sack, exercising reasonable caution. As to nesting: The stove sticks up above to top of my Firelite SUL-1100 pot. And it requires some padding, as the stove's diameter is an inch or so smaller than the pot, and rattles about. The Bush Buddy fits the SUL-1100 very well. I made mine as a "project", and have no real intention of using it. Especially now in our sensitive fire season. Maybe next time I'm on the Lost Coast... there's lots of fuel there too.

John Kays
(johnk) - M

Locale: SoCal
Photo Size on 07/12/2008 23:33:42 MDT Print View

I don't know what happened. I pulled the picture because of the size. The message is fairly well established anyway-the BB is not prone to rust.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
Re: MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 07/13/2008 08:17:53 MDT Print View

What I really appreciate about this stove is it at least appears to retain the ashes as opposed to dropping them in a pile on scorched earth as so many backpacking wood stoves do.

I would suggest you add feet to allow air circulation under the stove to guarantee the ground doesn't get cooked. Rivet nuts work well for this. They can be had from harbor freight as can the installation tool. Place three or four of them equally spaced around the outer rim on the bottom of the stove and install machine screws in them to act as legs. Screw the legs all the way in for stowage.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re:Cooking the ground on 07/13/2008 19:11:34 MDT Print View

The Bush Buddy stove may be picked up (with care) while burning. The inlet air holes at the bottom of the stove keep the metal from getting hot enough to burn my hand. My BB knock-off is not so well ventilated and gets too hot to comfortably touch. Neither stove leaves any burned area on the resting surface.

Edited by redleader on 07/16/2008 00:20:39 MDT.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 08/30/2008 20:54:42 MDT Print View

I had some time to tinker in the garage today and test out the burn time on my wood stove. Today was in the mid 80's (F) and was somewhat windy (gusts in the teens). Using 2 cups of cool water from the tap and a loosely fitted wind screen, I was able to reach a rolling boil in 9 minutes in my Heineken can.

From the pictures I posted earlier I made a few slight modifications. The first was removing the top of the pint sized inner can (which is upside down). Instead of the top I punched 4 holes just below where the lid was to insert the mesh screen. The second change was to shorten the wire mesh pot stand to get the Heineken can closer to the flame. The third change was to double the number of holes on the outer can to improve air flow. At present, the total weight of the stove and pot stand is right at 5.5 ounces. Here's some pics of the stove burning:








It is incredible how little smoke is put off while burning and how little ashes are remaining. This pile was from keeping the stove burning for an hour.

Edited by brianjbarnes on 08/30/2008 21:03:06 MDT.

Christopher Holden
(back2basics) - F - MLife

Locale: Southeast USA
Re: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 08/30/2008 21:04:08 MDT Print View

Brian,
For an hour of burn time, that isn't much ash. That implies good fuel efficiency of the stove. Good work!
Chris

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 09/02/2008 19:21:13 MDT Print View

Brian, your instructions were very clear and easy to follow. O made a stove per your instructions and it was very easy to make. Thank You

I'm working on a special project to dispell what I think is an "Urban Legend" when it comes to these little wood stoves. Here is a video of the stove that I made today.

Thanks again Brian for the neat stove.

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Edited by zelph on 09/02/2008 19:22:54 MDT.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE:"MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 09/03/2008 11:45:14 MDT Print View

Hi Dan. Cool video. I'm curious as to why you don't think the bush buddy design functions like an inverted downdraft gasifier?

When mine burns you can see the gasses being emitted from the wood and it's being pulled down through the wire mesh. The flames are visibly being fueled by the mixture of air and wood gas and develop a nice flame pattern from the inner holes.

It appears that your version of the stove doesn't have holes in the outer can towards the bottom. Perhaps this is an issue?

Not a big deal either way. I don't so much care how it works but rather am pleased with the smoke free and high yield burning capability of the stove.

Derek Goffin
(Derekoak)

Locale: North of England
Re: RE:"MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 09/03/2008 12:51:45 MDT Print View

"I'm curious as to why you don't think the bush buddy design functions like an inverted downdraft gasifier?

When mine burns you can see the gasses being emitted from the wood and it's being pulled down through the wire mesh. The flames are visibly being fueled by the mixture of air and wood gas and develop a nice flame pattern from the inner holes.

Not a big deal either way. I don't so much care how it works but rather am pleased with the smoke free and high yield burning capability of the stove."

I agree the nomenclature is not as important as the smoke free fun of this stove. However why saddle it with "Inverted downdraft gasifier"? It is a preheated gasifier. Only up draught gasification is possible without fans. I have never seen gases pulled down on mine.
On mine the outer jacket does not reach the ground but the inner one does so there is no easy path from under the grate to the top holes. You still get the same flame pattern and no smoke because the unburnt fumes coming up from the fuel, mix with preheated air coming out of the top holes and ignite as you see in your picture, no down draught is involved and no inverted down, (unless you mean up). Your flame picture is very good and clear, you can see that all the flame is below the jets coming out of the top holes. Those people who think that ignitable gases are coming out of the top holes should expect flames all round the jets.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE: "MYOG Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 09/03/2008 13:22:52 MDT Print View

Ah... that's interesting Derek. I called it a Inverted downdraft stove since that's what the technical articles I read about the stove design called it.

So your hypothesis is that the fire inside in the inner can heats the air in between the inner and outer can, causing air to be pulled from the lower outside into the upper inner holes (makes sense). When this oxygen rich air reaches the inside of the can it mixes with wood gas that is rising upwards and creates flames (seems plausible). I can see the flame pattern is only on the lower portion of the inner holes. This would support what you are stating.

Despite this I do see wood gas creeping downward off wood chunks and heading toward the low wire mesh grate supporting the coals. I don't see it during all of the burn time but it is certainly visible when I first add in a new chunk of wood.

I purposely place the holes on the outside can above the bottom of the inner can so that air would be less likely to rise up through the middle and more likely to rise up between the two cans. Perhaps this is why I'm seeing some down draft of wood gas? On the other hand it could be that I'm hallucinating from the residual pain fumes and all that darn nasty Heineken I had to drink for the cook pot!?!

Edited by brianjbarnes on 09/03/2008 13:25:51 MDT.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: RE: "MYOG Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 09/03/2008 15:36:33 MDT Print View

Here is a diagram of the original stove that was named "downdraught wood Gassifier" The stove was ignited from the top and burned in a downward fashion. Air being introduced at the base of the stove and controled with a valve. Air was also introduced at another location as shown.

The second photo is a commercial stove that the guy produced according to the diagram.

The stoves that are being introduced here are not like the original that everyone gives reference to. The makers are giving their theories of how they are operating.

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</center>

Edited by zelph on 09/03/2008 15:49:21 MDT.

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
Re: RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 10/06/2008 11:23:58 MDT Print View

Could you post a picture of the newly remodeled inside because I am trying to understand what you did. Thanks.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Random Trivia on 10/11/2008 08:53:33 MDT Print View

I was tinkering in the basement last night putting together this stove, was wondering about something I had laying around to use as a pot support for initial tests. If any of you have an old Svea 123 (brass cylindrical), the pot support/windscreen for that fits on top perfectly. Too bad it weighs a bit over 4 ounces!

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
punch on 10/17/2008 20:23:17 MDT Print View

Unfortunately my hole punch came with two screws without heads so I can put the bits into it

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 12/09/2008 17:48:12 MST Print View

Hey all-
Hope you don't mind me reviving this thread. Brian, your directions were indeed good. I made a couple variations and it came out all right. A few questions about this stove and woodstoves in general:

1) I've seen mixed recommendations for standard fire building and top-lit fire building for these stoves. What's the best way? Does it matter?

2) I wasn't thrilled with the performance of the stove. Had to feed it pretty much continuously or it'd die out. Brian, how often do you have to feed your stove?

3) The BB Ultra and the quart-can stove have sorta reversed dimensions--the BB is wider and w/a shorter firebox. Could it burn better, or at least a bit easier, by having that extra width? Maybe able to fit more fuel in effectively?

4) It seemed like the fire would die out even when there looked to be a decent amount of fuel in the stove (say half full anyway), which made me think the fire somehow wasn't getting enough airflow/oxygen. How does the placement of ventilation/holes on this stove compare to BB (hard to find internal pics of BB).

5) I bought the same hole punch. Think I'm inept at metal working at its absolute most basic. Not a single one of my holes punched cleanly through. They all had a tag piece keeping staying attached. The tag was uniform, meaning all at the nine o'clock position. Visual inspection of the punch showed no wear, missing chunks, or weird build up. Was it me?

Thanks for the feedback, gang-cheers.

Brad

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Hanging Chads on 12/09/2008 18:28:50 MST Print View

"Not a single one of my holes punched cleanly through."

I find that the punch seems to work best if you use a brisk motion once the punch touches the metal. If I operated the lever gently I sometimes got "hanging chads".

Experiment on scrap material.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 12/09/2008 18:48:41 MST Print View

Brad - Here's the photo you requested. Sorry it took so long to get to you. I loaned the stove out and just got it back.

Brian Barnes
(brianjbarnes) - M

Locale: Midwest
RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 12/09/2008 18:54:34 MST Print View

Brad - I lit my stove both ways, that is, starting at the bottom and adding fuel or adding fuel and lighting it on top. It works better slowly adding fuel (every minute or so) to an existing fire and not overloading the fuel box. Thus, I agree with you that the design suffers from poor air flow. I’ve considered making an external wall with the holes closer to the bottom (ground) since its been established that these are really not downdraft gassifiers. Perhaps this would get more air into the bottom of the fuel box. Oh, and my punch from harbor freight does the same thing… the company is not known for the best quality tools but it gets the job done…

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
grate material and how often you have to fuel. on 12/09/2008 19:33:29 MST Print View

It looks like this stove uses galvanized hardware cloth for a grate. In my experience, it will burn out pretty quick, like a couple of weeks. I recommend you get some nichrome or stainless steel wire. I've started using stainless steel safety wire for this reason. see http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=15999

In going from a 3 inch fire box to a 4 inch box, re-fuel time went from 2 min. to 10 min. I guess size is important.

Edited by herman666 on 12/09/2008 19:36:01 MST.

Jason Klass
(jasonklass) - F

Locale: Parker, CO
Wood Stove Video on 12/09/2008 20:02:02 MST Print View

Nice! Reminds me of the stove I was just playing around with this Sunday: The Bushwhacker stove from Jim Falk. Here's a video of it:

http://jasonklass.blogspot.com/2008/12/bushwhacker-stove.html

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: RE: "MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt" on 12/10/2008 08:24:42 MST Print View

Here are some internal photos of the bush buddy. that might help see how its made.













Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
OK on 12/11/2008 15:25:57 MST Print View

Thanks for the thoughtful responses, guys--glad to know I'm not crazy!

Thomas Jamrog
(balrog) - F - M

Locale: New England
MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - Maine attempt on 12/16/2008 12:52:47 MST Print View

I had made one of these a year and a half ago with the double paint can set up. The one I made was successful with just a cutting slits with a Mora knife for air flow through the base of the inner can ( inverted), and cut slits with the same knife for the inner gas holes. I made triangular holes with a sharp can opener on the base of the outer can. I held the two cans together with three sheet metal screws through the upper edges of both under the top opening. For a pot stand I screwed three sheet metal screws, about 1 and 1/4" long through two stacked oversized nuts down through the top of the unit. I backpacked with it all this past season.
I improved it immensely today. and made a new one.
Today I discovered that a Progresso soup can also fits tightly inside the inner lip of the quart paint can. I drilled out a mess of 1/4 # holes on the bottom of the Progresso inner can. I drilled 1/2 " holes along the base of the outer can, and the 1 row pattern of 1/2 " holes on the upper side of the inner soup can. I was not able to get the original version to burn down from the top, but this new one is something else. I tested it this afternoon, and stuffed filled the inner can with dried wood chips from around the wood pile. I kindled a small fire on top of the pile of wood and this time it burned all the way down through the pile, eventually igniting the inner holes with the secondary burn feature. This thing rocks. The larger holes on the cans was what i needed. I never had to add any wood with this unit. I will film the process and time the boil time for a pint of water and post it here.

Thomas Jamrog
(balrog) - F - M

Locale: New England
MYOG- backpacking wood stove on 12/25/2008 10:25:51 MST Print View

This is my final answer
Home made wood stove

: The following is the text from that post. For photos and a Youtube video of the stove in action go to the website entry --> http://tjamrog.wordpress.com/2008/12/22/the-evolving-backpacking-wood-stove/

The Evolving Backpacking Wood Stove

I think I have finally come close to my version of the perfect backpacking wood stove.
In 2007, I started my thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail with a wood stove. For that trip, I disassembled an older version of the Sierra Zip Stove , replacing the inner chamber with a modified titanium Sierra cup from REI , and ditching the old heavy base plate in favor of a Lexan replacement, with the addition of three Coleman folding legs. It weighed in around 9 ounces. The stove worked fine, but the Lexan base did not hold up ( cracked). I replaced it in Hot Springs, N.C. where I bought a simple Etowah alcohol stove that held up well for the remainder of the 2,175 mile walk.

But my preference for using a wood backpacking stove led me to sign up for a stove building workshop at Snow Walkers’ Rendezvous in November of 2007. The workshop was put on by Don Kivelus, of Four Dog Stoves. You can view all of Don’s products here: Catalogue. Don sells a titanium wood backpacking stove, the Bushcooker. I viewed the stove at his vendor table and when I inquired about purchasing one ( for $120) , he told me that I could buy his used demonstration model for $60, but then Don encouraged me to take his Sunday morning workshop for $10 and make my own low cost version. I had a blast with the workshop.

We each made our stoves out of one 1-quart paint can, one 1-pint paint can, 6 sheet metal screws and and six 1/4” bolts. No special tools were needed. We used only a can opener, knife, and screwdrivers. I have a video of that stove in use on YouTube , that has over 12,000 hits to date.
I used the stove throughout the 2008 backpacking season, and felt it could be improved.

For the last week I have been making and testing stoves.
The finished stove, including windscreen, weighs a mere 5.7 ounces. I filled the inner can with 2.9 ounces of air dried wood, scraps really, from around my wood pile. On 12/21/08, the air temp was a crisp 17 degrees. I was able to rolling boil a pint of cold tap water in 8 minutes and 45 seconds from touching off the birch bark tinder with a match. I removed the boiled water, made a pot of tea and then checked the stove at the 20 minute mark and could still see a small bed of coals glowing inside. NOTE: I did not add any additional wood after the stove was tindered. There were occasional gusts of wind as well. I plan to take along a sheet of aluminum foil to use as an emergency windbreak.

The most interesting finding about this new version is that it did not have to be tended. The first stove required me to frequently remove the cook pot in order to add additional wood. This one has been redesigned to allow adding wood without removing the cook pot, for example if you wanted to simmer for 10 minutes or so. But I never needed to add any additional wood.

I also revisited an older fire building technique. This stove burns from the top down. I packed the stove with 2.9 ounces of wood, lit it from the top, and forgot about it. Flames exit the top inner holes in this stove after the burn is halfway done.

At our summer camp, we have a older commercial wood stove that operates under the same procedure, brand name Tempwood . It was marketed in the 1970’s as a downdraft model. You load it with wood and kindle the top, just like this little stove. The Tempwood works just as advertised. There are disbelievers out there that are adamant that any backpacking wood stove can’t be a true downdraft unit, but doubters can check out the data/diagrams on the Tempwood, play around with this stove and decide for themselves.

Construction Details:
Outer Can- 1 quart paint can, bottom removed and 1/2 “ holes drilled along base. I bought my can for $1.70 at Lowe’s. You can use old paint cans as well, just clean them out, or throw them in a fire. I didn’t drill all the way around, but left untouched a 4” side of the can. You could do just half the can, in case you wanted to block wind, and add more holes later if you wanted to. A #1 Irwin Unibit cuts through these cans quickly , but a regular drill bit is also OK. It is easier to drill out the side holes on the paint can if you remove the bottom after you drill out the holes.

Inner can - best choice is a Progresso soup can, 1/4” holes drilled through bottom. Any 20 oz. can works as well, such as DelMonte or Dole crushed pineapple. Drill out a ring of 1/2” holes on the top of this can, about 1” apart and centered about 1” below the top of the can.

Friction fit the inner can into the paint can. Keep pushing, and you will feel it lock. I suspect you could use high temperature JB Weld to cement it in, but functions with the press fit. For long term use, I secured the fitment by screwing through the top sides of both with three 1/2 sheet metal screws. No drilling required.

The pot stand I made was constructed from a large can of canned chicken with 3/8” holes drilled and the use of tin snips. I fit it into the groove of the paint can for stability.

Dennis Hiorns
(hanson)

Locale: Michigan
Here's my attempt on 01/05/2009 18:30:56 MST Print View

I found the directions and suggestions in this thread very helpful, so I gave it a shot. My attempt weighs 5.05oz with the potstand, and it took 8 minutes to bring 16oz of tap water to a roiling boil (after the stove was warmed up).

I used the quart/pint cans like suggested above. I cut the bottom of the quart can off, and both the top and bottom of the pint can off (I saved the bottom of the quart can to protect the ground from burning).

Then I drilled (16) 1/2" holes in the bottom of the quart can, and (16) 3/8" holes in the top of the pint can (a "stepbit" or "unibit" works great for this). The holes in the bottom of the quart can need to be just above the height of the bottom of the inside can. I also drilled (4) 1/8" holes in the bottom of the pint can to attach the hardware cloth. I used JB Weld to attach the pint can top to the inside rim of the quart can. I took another piece of hardware cloth and fashioned a pot support that fits in the upper rim of the quart can.

It's not the easiest stove to work with, but once you get it going, you just have to add a small piece of wood every 30 seconds or so.

Here's the stove...
Woodstove

Here's a photo of the bottom (the pot stand fits in between the two cans)...
Woodstove bottom

Here are the parts...
Woodstove parts

And here's the stove with the pot stand...
Woodstove assembled

Thomas Jamrog
(balrog) - F - M

Locale: New England
More comments on woodgas stove on 01/05/2009 19:09:10 MST Print View

Dennis,
You say,
"It's not the easiest stove to work with, but once you get it going, you just have to add a small piece of wood every 30 seconds or so."

Have you tried packing your stove with small pieces of dry wood and then kindling a fire on TOP of the pile? This is how mine works. I find it VERY easy to work with, and I do not have to add any wood to get it to boil a pint of water.

New improvement: The most sturdy way to mate the two cans together is to use three 3/16 x 1/2 " pop rivets, along the top of the cans, instead of sheet metal screws.
I have made 6 of these stoves in the past few days. It is really fun. I am eating Progresso soup for lunch a lot, though.

Dennis Hiorns
(hanson)

Locale: Michigan
Getting the woodstove started on 01/05/2009 19:35:59 MST Print View

Yes, I've tried packing the stove with little sticks (about 1-3" long, pencil diameter) then piling tinder on top, but I can't get it to light the pile underneath. I've been trying this for two days, and for the life of me I can't seem to light a fire this way (from the top down). I'm not an idiot, but I sure feel like one trying to light a fire this way. How in the world do you do this?

I'm trying a new design (single can with holes on the bottom and top) - maybe this will lend itself better to a down-burning fire.

Stuart Bowman
(StuartBowman) - F

Locale: Manchester, UK
US-UK conversion help please on 06/04/2009 04:44:24 MDT Print View

hi there, I've just come across this forum and this thread and would really like to have a go at making one of these. But, can somebody give me the measurements of these tins and cans that you use? We don't have these quart and pint measurements on our tins over here in the UK.

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: US-UK conversion help please on 06/04/2009 04:54:05 MDT Print View

Hi Stuart,

Here's one I made from a Tate and Lyle syrup tin and an ordinary size bean can. It's the same weight and size as a BushBuddy.

.woodstove

Stuart Bowman
(StuartBowman) - F

Locale: Manchester, UK
US-UK conversion on 06/04/2009 08:46:15 MDT Print View

That looks deadly. I only want to heat up a bit of water!

Steven Evans
(Steve_Evans) - MLife

Locale: Canada
Re: US-UK conversion on 06/04/2009 10:35:44 MDT Print View

Rog is 6'8", so he cooks with a cauldron. :)

nice work though...same weight as the BB? cool.

Edited by Steve_Evans on 06/04/2009 11:33:38 MDT.

. Callahan
(AeroNautiCal)

Locale: Stoke Newington, London, UK.
Tate & Lyle on 06/04/2009 11:22:13 MDT Print View

Looks good, but the cast iron grate looks kinda heavy! (o:

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: Re: US-UK conversion on 06/04/2009 12:01:47 MDT Print View

Heh, first try, I put a couple of sugarlump sized bits of firelighter in with the nice dry twigs, and it worked a but better than I thought it would. :o)

Steven, do you still use your Ti version? I have some 0.005" foil now to play with.

Kevin Beeden
(captain_paranoia) - F

Locale: UK
Ti foil on 06/04/2009 12:50:34 MDT Print View

> I have some 0.005" foil now to play with.

The Titanium Goat stuff? What's it like to work with (cutting, folding, punching, etc)?

Been considering some of that for the SqueezeBox and Caldera Clones, and also thought it would be easier to use to make a wood stove than mucking about with cans.

A discussion on OM lead me to some simple maths that reminded me that the optimal burner area for a given burner sidewall area is achieved by an infinite number of sidewall plates, also known as a circle... Then it dawned on me that this could be achieved by rolling up a flat piece of Ti into a cylinder (d'oh!), locked together with tabs like my Caldera Clone.

Kevin Beeden
(captain_paranoia) - F

Locale: UK
Tate & Lyle on 06/04/2009 12:54:49 MDT Print View

> Here's one I made from a Tate and Lyle syrup tin and an ordinary size bean can.

I think the only appropriate response for that is the US vernacular:

Sweet!

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: Ti foil on 06/04/2009 13:39:31 MDT Print View

Hi Kevin,
No, it's not the CP2 grade TiGoat sell, I went for something with a bit more rigidity. It's 15-3-3-3 which has a large Vanadium content. It cuts and folds ok with a small bend radius, but is more brittle than CP2. Less deformation when punching and burred edges than CP2 though.

I'm currently experimenting with making a DC spot welder to use with it.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Ti foil on 06/04/2009 14:26:40 MDT Print View

Hi Rog

Where did you get he 15-3-3-3 from?
I have been working 6Al4V - hot. It cracks when cold, and I can't punch it anyhow.

I made up an AC spot welder out of a big transformer rewound on the secondary - works OK but is tricky to adjust for the different metal thicknesses.

Cheers

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: Re: Re: Ti foil on 06/04/2009 15:06:27 MDT Print View

Hi Roger, a 6' long 6" wide piece turned up on US ebay, and I bagged it. I'll check see if the seller has any more if you like.

Mike J.
(UnionDhaka) - F

Locale: It changes.
so far.. on 06/08/2009 09:54:00 MDT Print View

Been coming in to work smelling like a hippy for the past two days because of this!

Made two prototypes, still needs a bit of tinkering, but so far I'm impressed.

The first one was with a 840ml can of beans on the outside and a can of catfood on the inside which turned out to be too narrow. Now I found a can in between those two sizes, works better, more space for wood..

Once I figured out that lighting the stove from the TOP is imperative I got much better results. Right now with a very much imperfectly sealed stove I got a good-burn time of ~15 min. It took me a bit to cop on but the idea is simply to build a fire on top of your already filled stove. I've been putting the sticks in vertically to get as many inside as possible and still have air-flow. And I *think* they burn slower this way.

It uses very little wood considering the ammount of burn time you get, meaning you can use it just about anywhere. And no smoke means it's stealthy.

One of my objections is that it's bulky unless you're carrying a pot that you can fit it in to. This is also why I refuse to make it any taller than the can I'm using now.

Another objection is that once the fire burns down, you have to add sticks, creating smoke, and the fire is burning from the bottom again, unless you start all over again. So it's good for a stealthy cup of coffee but not a proper meal, unless I manage to get it going for 45+ mins, but with this size can I can't see it happening. May post pictures soon for all you backwards hicks still using the imperial system to give you an idea of the size. ;)

Mike J.
(UnionDhaka) - F

Locale: It changes.
Still wondering .. on 06/08/2009 11:17:24 MDT Print View

.. whether to put the bottom of the inner can above the holes of the outer can or a bit lower down? Haven't got enough cans to test this at the moment and me and the dog both are sick of eating beans and catfood.

Edited by UnionDhaka on 06/08/2009 11:21:28 MDT.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Still wondering .. on 06/08/2009 23:50:28 MDT Print View

Mike a drawing I have has the bottom about midway thru the hole on the bottom of the outer can (the drawing is of a actual Bushbuddy- as best the guy could tell)

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Re: Still wondering .. on 06/09/2009 08:22:20 MDT Print View

Was that the sketch I posted?

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Still wondering .. on 06/09/2009 11:07:09 MDT Print View

I think so- thank you if it was!

Steven Evans
(Steve_Evans) - MLife

Locale: Canada
Re: US-UK conversion on 06/09/2009 13:18:42 MDT Print View

Rog,
Just saw this...my ti version is long gone. Overuse and lack of construction quality lead to it's demise. I tried a number of smaller single wall versions...even had one that worked sort of well but still to finicky for me. Honestly, esbit is just so much easier to use, for me anyway.

Of course, I have another one in the works...but I have about 30 things in the works right now so it isn't getting priority.

Nice job by the way!

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
RE: MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove on 10/27/2009 15:21:14 MDT Print View

Dragging this thread up from the archives...

Where can I get a pint sized paint can as discussed in these posts? I've looked at Home Depot and a couple varieties of paint stores and nobody seems to carry them.

Also for the quart version, all they have are the coated versions and I think I would like the uncoated version so I'm not burning the plastic lining off when using the stove.

Any direction on finding these would be great!

j lan
(justaddfuel) - F

Locale: MN
MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 10/27/2009 15:50:03 MDT Print View

After the first burn the quart paint can will be totally clean. Pretty minor. For my inner I used a progresso soup can that pressure fits exactly into the base of the quart can and I am guessing is lighter that the pint can.

I will post pics when i can, mine works great.... until you add wet fuel ;)

Michael Skwarczek
(uberkatzen) - F

Locale: Sudamerica
pint and quart cans for woodgas stove on 10/27/2009 15:50:21 MDT Print View

"Where can I get a pint sized paint can as discussed in these posts? I've looked at Home Depot and a couple varieties of paint stores and nobody seems to carry them.

Also for the quart version, all they have are the coated versions and I think I would like the uncoated version so I'm not burning the plastic lining off when using the stove."

OSH has both the quart and the pint. Uncoated is not an option that I have seen. I haven't noticed fumes myself.

good luck,
-Michael

Terra _
(terra@c-3.nu) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest - i.e. wet!
Re: MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 10/27/2009 18:41:52 MDT Print View

Beautiful! Really polished looking :) I'm excited to find out about the Harbor Freight deep throat metal punch, because I want to re-make my tin can Wood-gas stove in stainless steel (I'm going to use food storage canisters made in stainless). I was not looking forward to trying to punch holes through those containers, but that hole punch looks perfect! The simplicity of design in these Wood-gas stoves really charms me, now I just want to make one that won't rust :)

Thanks for all the photos!

John Roan
(JRoan) - MLife

Locale: Vegas
Re: Re: MYOG Inverted Downdraft Woodgas Stove - My Attempt on 10/27/2009 19:07:47 MDT Print View

Made with Ti Goat foil, and Harbor Freight punch tool...

MYOG Ti-Tri 07

Daniel Benthal
(DBthal)

Locale: Mid-Coast Maine
Paint Can for Stove on 10/27/2009 20:30:19 MDT Print View

"Where can I get a pint sized paint can?"

They are sold at ACE Hardware Stores.

"(I'm going to use food storage canisters made in stainless). I was not looking forward to trying to punch holes through those containers, but that hole punch looks perfect!"

I have had good luck with a UniBit to make round holes in stainless steel.

http://zenstoves.net/Supplies-Special.htm

Edited by DBthal on 10/27/2009 20:33:46 MDT.

Jeremy Gustafson
(gustafsj) - MLife

Locale: Minneapolis
re: pint size can on 10/27/2009 21:10:20 MDT Print View

Thanks Daniel! I'll check at ACE. We don't have OSH around here, so that one won't work...

I am actually going to play around with the pint size can to make a double-wall stove to fit inside my SP 600. I'll follow the J Falk model, but make it smaller. I don't know if it will work or not, but I thought it would be worth a try.

I have also used the uni-bit for drilling holes for the regular J Falk bushwhacker and it works very well. I did figure out that the 1/8" bit to pre-drill needs to be new and/or very sharp. It makes a big difference!

John, is yours a double-wall or is it a caldera cone knock-off? I would like to play around with some titanium and double-wall stoves, but need to get some more experience playing around with cheaper metals before I start carving up the tigoat stuff. That will come soon enough!

KC H
(damngoat) - F
Chopped Wood Burner on 10/28/2009 07:58:40 MDT Print View

I have built a few of these paint can stoves and found that they work really well. My biggest hold up with taking them on trips is that I didn't like how tall they were and that they didn't nest completely into any of my pots. However, another member showed me that a flashing endcap could be used as a bottom, and this allowed me to chop the stove to the height I desired. I was worried that the shorter height would not work as well, but my tests so far show it works really well.


Chopped Wood Stove


Chopped Stove Nested



Burning the Chopped Stove


Video of the Stove Burning:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Swx0R-xxEoA

Edited by damngoat on 10/28/2009 08:00:21 MDT.

John Roan
(JRoan) - MLife

Locale: Vegas
Re: re: pint size can on 11/02/2009 18:15:18 MST Print View

"John, is yours a double-wall or is it a caldera cone knock-off? I would like to play around with some titanium and double-wall stoves, but need to get some more experience playing around with cheaper metals before I start carving up the tigoat stuff. That will come soon enough!"

Jeremy,

Mine is a Caldera Ti-Tri Inferno knock-off, although I haven't seen one this light weight. It is a downdraft gasfier design with two cones.

MYOG Ti-Tri 03

Works really good, was easy to make, and only weighs 2.15oz.

Good idea to play with a less expensive aluminum design before switching to titanium. Just don't burn wood in your aluminum design :~)>

See more info at this link

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=25085&skip_to_post=205299#205299

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: re: pint size can on 11/26/2009 20:48:01 MST Print View

Well done Johnnydune

I wish I would have discovered this thread and the Caldera Tri Tri Inferno before I spent weeks trying to design my own flat packing wood gas stove. However it did teach me a few things.

Most obviously I have found a square cone is no where near as efficient as the round caldera design. However you can still make a caldera cone in two halves if you want a bit more versatility in packing it.

Below is a little summation based on my experiences. Hopefully some will find it useful.


1) Taking from the Nimble Will Little Dandy wood stove I've found if you put notches in the top of the stove you can quickly improvise a grill with a couple stakes.

2) Canned good cans make superb burn cans. I think it's primarily the corrugation. This is cool because even if you are carrying just a regular Caldera cone you can improvise an absolutely superb burn chamber that will function as well as if not better then the Inferno chamber. All you need is an appropriate sized can good and a can opener.

3) The smaller diameter the burn chamber the more efficient the burn.

4) The taller the stove the more efficient the burn, but to tall and it becomes unstable and heavy.

5) Taller stoves are easier to load since you don't have to cut wood as short and it has little impact on the diameter wood the stove can take because even a single 3" log in a 4" wide burn chamber will burn efficiently in a wood gas stove.

6) A taller narrower stove will not only burn longer... but it'll burn steadier and more consistent then a shorter / wider stove.

The trick is finding the right width to height ratio to give you optimum stability, weight and performance. I find something a few inches taller then the Tri Tri caldera to be optimal for wood.

7) Split wood ignites faster producing less smoke and burns hotter. Split your wood. A small fixed blade knife and improvised baton works great for the small amount of wood a woodgas stove uses.

8) Any wood sticking up much if any above the secondary burn line will produce lots of good smoke. Keep your wood below the secondary burn line.

9) Due the above reasons it is better to invest in good lightweight splitting and cutting tools and keep the stove as small as possible rather than make a bigger stove and put poorly processed wood in it.

The best tools I've found thus far are simply a Coughlan's Pocket Sierra Saw (2.5oz) or the smallest Fiskars retracting pruning saw (3.4oz) for cutting in use with a small fixed blade pocket knife for splitting with an improvised baton.

You can carry a single bow saw blade (extremely light!) and with a bit of practice improvise a first class bow saw with no other tools in just a couple minutes. However the bow saw is over kill if you intend to use it just for your ultralight wood gas stove because the stove requires such small amounts of wood. Is great for campfires though!

8) A wood gas stove that can use forced air (a fan) will burn a great deal hotter, cleaner and more consistent.

A tiny 12 volt microprocessor fan from a computer will not only increase heat and decrease smoke. Most importantly newly added wood will ignite dramatically faster (usually instantaneously) therefore smoking far less while you're cooking.

It also only requires a tiny amount of air to increase the effectiveness of the stove, i.e. 6 to 9 volts is enough with a 12 volt fan is usually more then enough.

9) A single 2" x 2" hole in the caldera cone works just as well as many smaller ones and ads some versatility.

First by having one big hole can make the stove work better by pointing it into or away from the wind.

What's more having only one hole allows you to use forced air (i.e. a fan) extremely efficiently.

(Trail Deigns does make a caldera btw that has flaps instead of holes that can be opened or closed as you see fit, this may be the most flexible solution of all.)


Well, I think that's te best of what I've got at the moment.

-Mike

Thomas Graham
(tomasito) - F
RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 13:52:10 MST Print View

Hi there.

I've been having some fun looking at some of these projects. I've got a couple tweaks I would be interested in checking out. Probably I am not going to be able to avoid making another wood-gas stove.

First, though, I want to ask this question:

John Roan wrote:

"Good idea to play with a less expensive aluminum design before switching to titanium. Just don't burn wood in your aluminum design :~)>"

I know you're probably talking about the cone, but isn't the Heinie can made of aluminum? If so, are there some applications of aluminum that actually do work with these stoves, and other applications of aluminum that don't?

John Roan
(JRoan) - MLife

Locale: Vegas
Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 15:21:45 MST Print View

Thomas,

When the aluminum beer can pot is filled with water, it works just fine. If you tried putting it on the fire empty, it wouldn't fair quite as well.

Try setting a styrofoam cup filled with water on a campfire...the cup will burn down to down to the water line, and won't burn any further until the water boils and evaporates or boils over. Once there's no water of course, the cups if gone in seconds. Amazing what a little water can do!

For the DD gassifier type, as long as the inside and pot holders are made from steel, the outside portion can be aluminum. I played with this design quite extensively utilizing a Sapporo beer can as the firebox/pot holder, and a fosters/heine can as the outside and the aluminum did just fine. The issue with this stove was that the fire box was so small that you had to continuously feed it...too high maintenance for me! :~)>

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 17:15:32 MST Print View

I concur. The outer can or heat shield can definitely be aluminum.

Even if you could use a heavy aluminum can for the internal burn chamber (i.e. Sapporo) I would not recommend it because it cools to quickly.

After fairly extensive testing I highly recommend a standard canned good can. The material is right, the coorugation is brilliant for heat transfer and hot air convection. It basically glows red. Quite beautiful.

What's more you needn't use the whole can. The fosters can design may require it but I cut off the top and bottom at the beed and cut down one side. This is not only lighter but allows the can just enough flexibility that it can fit around or inside a great variety of pots or containers.

My heat caldera style shield is now 3-piece allowing it to flat pack so the design can be taller and doesn't stick out of the top of the pot. Essentially the stove packs down to nothing. Right now my version is about 8" tall and weighs in at about 6oz... and I expect it'll drop a few more oz before I'm ready to share it. With a titanium cone it'd be lighter still not just because titanium is lighter but because I can actually go thinner with titanium as well since it's more rigid.

p.s. A pie plate or simple piece of aluminum with dirt on it makes an excellent base if you want to use these stoves on a picnic table or avoid scorching the ground.

John Roan
(JRoan) - MLife

Locale: Vegas
Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 18:19:37 MST Print View

Surprisingly enough, the walls of a Sapporo can are thin steel, only the top and bottom at aluminum. Still very light. Just too small for my testing.

MM - I like the idea of your cone in separate pieces so it can fit into the keg/pot. Trail Designs does a customized version that does that as well. There was a forum on this site some time ago that covered it.

Rand Lindsly
(randlindsly) - MLife

Locale: Yosemite
Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 21:53:48 MST Print View

I put the split Caldera Cone up on the BPL wiki at:

http://wiki.backpackinglight.com/Caldera_Fissure

There you can find the links to the BPL threads on the subject as well.

Also....to a previous point.....titanium is a LOT heavier than aluminum......something like 60% heavier.

Rand

John Roan
(JRoan) - MLife

Locale: Vegas
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 22:13:10 MST Print View

Rand,

Thanks for the link. Any possibility you might make a Heineken Caldera Ti-Tri Inferno Fissure? (Wow, that's a mouth full!) If anyone's up for the challenge, it's you guys!

:~)> John

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/03/2009 22:30:55 MST Print View

The fisure is very interesting but it's not what I'm trying to accomplish. I split the cone into three pieces in the round so it breaks down flat and doesn't need to go in a pot (though the 3 pieces could also still be rolled). I intend to pack it flat against the inside backing of my bike pannier, but it would also allow it to be packed easier into a rolled mat

P.S. I take it people favored the single piece caldera for it's simplicty.

BTW... titanium weight... wow, what was I thinking. I get so used to people talking about lightweight titanium products I forget it's actually heavier then aluminum for the same mass. The weight savings comes in that you have to use less to get the same strength. Sorry to promote such misinformation. Really I know better... to much late night typing. I think they call it a "logical fallacy".

Rand Lindsly
(randlindsly) - MLife

Locale: Yosemite
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/04/2009 02:14:19 MST Print View

John:

No need to "fissure" a Heinie cone....the Keg-H cone already fits in the Heinie can! All we would have to do is make it out of titanium, cobble together an inferno, and then figure out a hole to throw wood in.

MM:

Yea....late night typing got you again.....titanium is heavier than aluminum for the same volume....weight would be the same for the same mass! :-) I do it all the time....wake up the next morning and read what I wrote and just cringe! As to making a cone out of multiple panels, we've done it. Pretty easy with our dovetail machine. We just make several panels that all dovetail together at the seams. We've done 2, 3, 4, and even 5 panel cones. Let me know if we can help you out.....you have the email address!

Rand :-)

Edited by randlindsly on 12/04/2009 02:18:40 MST.

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: RE: Aluminum on 12/04/2009 02:41:09 MST Print View

Randy: Would love to chat with you if you have time. I should finish with my home brew prototype first though, lest I never get it finished.

My personal email is michael *at- mmeiser.com. (Hate to post my email but I couldn't find any way to contact someone privately here. Minor shortcoming of the forum?)

Right now I'm going to finish my home brew stove since it's so close to done and then hopefully post it up here for review. Who knows, maybe there will be some original aspects to it that are worth noting.

p.s. Have you given any interviews that are posted online anywhere? There was a thread on this forum about interviews with small businesses in the space. I found it tremendously interesting. One of the most insightful and inspirational interviews was one with the Brush Buddy founder on hikinginfinland.blogspot.com

Hiking in Finland guy (Hendrik M) interviewed four or five people from various businesses in this space but I don't believe I've seen one from you yet. He's got one heck of a superb blog btw. Great interviews. And to be honest it was his blog that really got me interested in the Tri Tri Inferno. Great review:

http://hikinginfinland.blogspot.com/2009/09/gear-talk-trail-designs-ti-tri-inferno.html

If you'd like, or at least not mind I could shoot him your email address. I'm sure he'd love to interview you. Else, maybe I should just "email interview" you myself though I must admit I'm new to this space, a complete babe in the woods, so to speak. I wasn't even familiar with your company or for that matter most of the companies in this space until the last month or so. Though I'm a hiker since childhood I ave come about this forum through ultralight bicycle touring.

Also, regarding my intentions with my this prototype I'm designing. I'm a designer, I dream of one day jumping into this or some other niche market with a unique product, but mostly I did it to do it. For fun, to learn, to see if I could develop a better stove, and just so I could use it. That said I'm thinking that if there is anything that you find useful in my design I'd be honored if you were to incorporate it your work. When and if I finally get around to posting it here it'll naturally be public domain by proxy anyway.

Edited by mmeiser on 12/04/2009 03:03:24 MST.

Rand Lindsly
(randlindsly) - MLife

Locale: Yosemite
(8x Re:) RE: Aluminum on 12/04/2009 10:28:33 MST Print View

Michael:

Very familiar with Hendrik.....in fact, he did a killer review of the Ti-Tri Inferno for us....check it out here:

http://hikinginfinland.blogspot.com/2009/09/gear-talk-trail-designs-ti-tri-inferno.html

Also, as to interviews, turns out I did do one for a different blogger.....you can find that here:

http://hrxxl.wordpress.com/2009/11/02/im-gesprach-rand-lindsly-von-trail-designs/

Rand (without a "y") :-)

Edited by randlindsly on 12/04/2009 14:45:28 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
re private emails, for mm on 12/04/2009 13:38:36 MST Print View

> Hate to post my email but I couldn't find any way to contact someone privately
> here. Minor shortcoming of the forum?

Click on the person's name at their posting. That will take you to their personal details page. Then send them a PM (private message).
Granted, the PM system isn't great, but it works.

Cheers

Michael Meiser
(mmeiser) - F

Locale: Michigan
Re: re private emails, for mm on 12/04/2009 14:49:34 MST Print View

Aha,

"You must specify an email address in your user profile in order to send this user a personal message (PM)."

because I hadn't bothered to put in my email address I can't see anyone elses. Lol. Will rectify immediately. :)

Thanks

JJ Mathes
(JMathes) - F

Locale: Southeast US
Sticky pots on 12/13/2009 16:33:18 MST Print View

I've been reading a lot about wood burning stoves and have tried a couple that a friend built. The soot that gets on the sides and bottom of the pot, is it always "sticky"?

bj bretzke
(lilorphanbilly) - F

Locale: Montana, MT (Stealth Mode)
Made to go together on 12/14/2009 13:35:00 MST Print View

While I was taking out the trash the other I accidentally came across something very cool. A 10.5oz campbells soup pull tab can fits inside a Del-Monte pear halves pull tab can snug with virtually no leaks. I went ahead and punched the holes similar to Brian's paint cans. It seems to work beautifully. Can't find my camera but I'll post pics when I do. As far as sticky residue it is probably your fuel. It isn't really soot but creosote. IMHO

Thomas Graham
(tomasito) - F
RE: Sapporo materials. on 12/16/2009 15:33:40 MST Print View

John Roan said:

Surprisingly enough, the walls of a Sapporo can are thin steel, only the top and bottom at aluminum. Still very light. Just too small for my testing.

What source do you have for this fact? Just curious.

Thomas Graham
(tomasito) - F
RE: Sapporo weight on 12/16/2009 16:46:28 MST Print View

The Sapporo can does indeed appear to be significantly heavier - empty weight is about 9 g for 650 ml can, versus Foster's at 3.1 g for a 750 ml can.

J Morneau
(Jemor143) - F
rugged woodgas stove on 08/18/2011 09:31:38 MDT Print View

This thread is great!
Last year I built the paint can stove, but I have to tweek the air intakes a bit...

Look what I found here: http://www.randonner-leger.org/forum/viewtopic.php?id=351&p=3
It's in french, but the pictures are great. The guy use a double wall stainless steel mug to built his stove. It's on the heavy side, but it certainly won't rust or get dent. Nice KISS design!
Most of the mug I found on the web were too small (around 10-14oz), but there are a few 20 oz models that would do a great job. If you want a bigger stove, stainless steel wine buckets or coolers would be a great choice (approx 9" x 5")


Mug wood gas

Edited by Jemor143 on 08/18/2011 09:41:25 MDT.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
adjustable CC Sidewinder on 08/19/2011 17:49:43 MDT Print View

As Rand Lindsey knows I purchased the CC Sidewinder (ti) setup for alky, ESBIT and the Inferno woodburner W/ a 3 cup pot. I told him I wanted to make it adjustable for other pot sizes and he said to let him se it when I finished. First attempts with aluminum flashing material were not successful but came close. It's a matter of trial and error to get the right slot distances for a good fit to the larger (1 L.) pot. Obviously I'd also have to make an insert for the inner Inferno cone as well.

A slot-and-tab method has been my prefered experimental method of attatching any "expander". One could use a few very narrow, short slots to do this without compromising the downdraft design too much IMO. I've found he tab needs to be "hooked" on the bottom side to keep it from slipping out of the slot. Getting the bottom of the tab the correct height is crucail to keep the top edge of the cone level all the way around.