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What's in your first aid kit?
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Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: burn cream on 02/26/2009 14:39:04 MST Print View

I DO carry a small vial of burn cream. An essential component imho.

Cheers

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
out w/ the old, in w/ the new on 09/14/2009 20:18:20 MDT Print View

after lots and lots of reading/researching I've started all over with my first kit and ended saving an ounce w/ a much better kit

my original kit looks like the normal small first aid kit- not a bad kit, but certainly room for improvement

old kit- 2 4x4's, 2 3x3's, 1.5 sheets of moleskin, 2 triple antibiotic, asst bandages, ace bandage, roll of gauze, butterfly closures, medical tape, ibuprofen, tylonel, antihistamine, and antidiarrhea - all in a pretty red first aid bag

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new kit- I re-used the "medicine" and the roll of gauze, I added a small curved tip irrigator, 2 4x4.5 tegaderm bandages, pack of 10 1/4 x4 steri-strips, two triple antibiotic creams, 3 2g Celox (hemostatic agent), 2' of Leukotape (wrapped around a section of a straw), 2 vials of tincture of benzoin- all in a pretty (waterproof!) 6x9" alkosak :)

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old kit 3.7 oz, new 2.7 oz- just by going to the alkosak vs the pretty red bag netted ~ 0.3 oz

I also re-packaged my repair kit and mention it here as many of the items (duct tape, needle, safety pins, alcohol prep pads, super glue) do double duty for first aid- by putting the repair kit in a 3x4 ziplock I saved 0.5 oz (over the leather Chouinard bag) (1.4 vs 0.9)

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there are numerous other items floating around in my kit that would probably qualify as first aid, probably foremost of which is the the swiss army classic w/ scissors and tweezers- great little instrument for less than an ounce

btw if anyone is interested I was forced to pick up some of the items (like the irrigator) in multi-piece lots

Mike

Edited by mtwarden on 09/14/2009 20:35:53 MDT.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Re: out w/ the old, in w/ the new on 09/15/2009 11:04:49 MDT Print View

A small ziploc baggie with the corner nipped off works great for irrigation...

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
irrigator on 09/15/2009 17:10:48 MDT Print View

good idea- a play w/ a bitel top would work pretty well too

I'm pretty impressed w/ the little 12cc one- it puts out a fair amount of pressure and you can direct the stream very accurately

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: out w/ the old, in w/ the new on 09/15/2009 18:07:40 MDT Print View

A small ziploc baggie with the corner nipped off works great for irrigation...

Not that I have needed to use one yet but two outdoors oriented wilderness first aid classes offered by different organizations have told me that few if any improvised irrigation devices work nearly as well as a syringe designed for the purpose ... 1) not enough velocity and 2) difficulties in pinpointing a small target.

Mine weighs 8 grams (0.29oz)

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: irrigation devices on 09/15/2009 22:26:25 MDT Print View

Curious. Extra weight.
I normally use a (hopefuly) clean handkerchief and a water bottle. Zero extra weight.

Cheers

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
irrigator on 09/16/2009 17:51:32 MDT Print View

I had read the same thing concerning pressure- there are several medical reports documenting this (just google high pressure wound irrigation)

we must have the same 12cc irrigator, as mine weighs 8 grams as well :)

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Re: Re: out w/ the old, in w/ the new on 09/17/2009 08:59:15 MDT Print View

Curious... I learned about the baggie trick in a W-EMT class and, I believe, in OEC. Have to nip off a tiny bit of the corner. If you want to carry the syringe, by all means! But if you're trying to cut as much weight as possible and still achieve decent irrigation if the need actually arises... knowledge and improvisation are the kings of backcountry medical "treatment."

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
agreed on 09/17/2009 13:41:23 MDT Print View

no arguments here- knowledge/innovation is indeed paramount in wilderness first aid

that same handy baggie can also be used (w/a little duct tape) as a occlusive patch for a chest wound