Forum Index » Make Your Own Gear » MYOG - A Winter Canister Stove using your Summer Upright Stove and the Brunton Stove Stand


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Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Can side valve: I understand why is required. on 12/03/2011 12:54:26 MST Print View

Hi Alan

Sorry - I missed this.

> It seems odd gelert will sell a remote stove adaptor without a can valve
As to why they only have one valve on a remote canister stove - COST.

> I worried about hidden damage underneath the braid
We have recently seen cheap Chinese stoves with really unreliable hoses, so that can be a concern. But the 'good' stoves usually have a far better plastic (something like PFA) inside the braid which very rarely suffers any damage.

Cheers

Stuart R
(Scunnered) - F

Locale: Scotland
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: remote canister Gnat.construction on 12/03/2011 13:15:19 MST Print View

Jim - the vapouriser tube is brazed into the narrow diameter end, the nut on the threaded middle section holds the legs and the stove screws onto the threaded end.

Alan Bradley
(ahbradley)
Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/04/2011 12:30:16 MST Print View

>> It seems odd gelert will sell a remote stove adaptor without a can valve
Roger Caffin responded "As to why they only have one valve on a remote canister stove - COST."

I had thought they(gelert) might worry about being sued:
if the hose/stove goes wrong and the user has no canister side valve to stop gas flow, they might try to disconnect the canister which, as you explained earlier, might not go so well due to a possible small amount liquid gas escaping before cannister seals.

I don't think its made anymore.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim)

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: remote canister Gnat.construction on 12/06/2011 23:50:51 MST Print View

Jim - the vapouriser tube is brazed into the narrow diameter end, the nut on the threaded middle section holds the legs and the stove screws onto the threaded end.
Nice. Very nice. Thank you.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim)

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/06/2011 23:57:19 MST Print View

I had thought they(gelert) might worry about being sued:
Gelert has (from what I've read) had to pull a couple of items off of the market. One was an adapter that would connect a 100% butane canister with a bayonet connector to a stove with a standard threaded connector. Apparently there were some quality control issues. They had a stainless steel disk shape arrangement on one end and a threaded brass connector on the other. This type is still available from China. NOT recommended.

The Kovea connectors that accomplish the same thing are a good product, but they have a connector that is completely different and their's is secure.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Sean Rhoades
(kingpin)

Locale: WV
Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/07/2011 19:29:36 MST Print View

I actually purchased one of the Chinese versions of this stand without the can side valve. It was so poorly made, I had to use a heat shunt for it to work with the can right side up. Of course the Chinese vendor sent me another one, this one modeled after the Brunton stand with the valve. The new one works beautifully. The old one has since been gutted and used for parts.

The threads used on the fittings from the braided line to the stand itself are what I have been trying to figure out lately in my thread about MYOG stove. Anyone that messed with those Brunton stands know what those threads were. Shot in the dark, I know, but I'm still hard up to find out these threads.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/07/2011 23:06:42 MST Print View

Hi Sean

Buy a good vernier caliper and a good metric thread gauge. Might as well buy a good imperial thread gauge as well. These are tools which last 'for ever'. Measurement solves an awful lot of problems.

Cheers

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim)

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Thread Gauge for Stove Mods on 12/09/2011 12:33:52 MST Print View

Sean,

I think Roger's advice is good (typically it is). You'll save yourself a lot of headache if you just get the proper tool. Guessing or just going by what someone remembers is a great way to guarantee parts that don't mesh with one another.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Sean Rhoades
(kingpin)

Locale: WV
Re: Re: Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/10/2011 17:22:47 MST Print View

Good solid advice. Cash is low for the time being though. So when I'm able, I'd like to purchase those guages.

Edit: A vernier caliper is just a regular old caliper for measuring right?

Edited by kingpin on 12/10/2011 18:46:45 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/11/2011 02:50:43 MST Print View

Yes. It helps you tell whether the thing is imperial or metric - usually. Actually, most threads are undersize on the oD, so some guessing may be required. But the thread gauges are invaluable if you don't have a good collection of KNOWN nuts and bolts.

The probability of the Brunton being imperial is LOW.

Cheers

Sean Rhoades
(kingpin)

Locale: WV
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/11/2011 14:27:33 MST Print View

Well I've got calipers now, and fairly certain I can borrow the thread pitch guage from a friend. I'll be sure to post my findings once I have both instruments. Thanks for all the help from the BPL community,

Roger and Jim,

Thanks for your patience with all my questions.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim)

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gelert: I had thought their worry of being sued might override cost savings. on 12/11/2011 22:25:14 MST Print View

Well, I think Roger's a bit more help than I am on this type of project, but for whatever I've had to offer you're welcome.

I have to say that my involvement here on BPL has upped my understanding of stoves by at least a power of ten. Lately, it's been alcohol stove design, but basically any kind of backpacking type stove you can think of will have been tried by someone here on BPL.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Cheap and free thread gauges on 12/12/2011 11:18:41 MST Print View

Cheap: Home Depot (and most any hardware store) sells a plastic thread gauge with all the metric and English threads marked / incised onto a plastic sheet, about 9"x6". $5 maybe.

Free: Go to Home Depot and use the gauge there, or use the better metal studs and nuts they have on display for exactly that reason: So people can determine which thread they have.

Note that machine threads are constant diameter while pipe threads are tapered. And the threads on compression fittings don't match with machine threads or with pipe threads and they vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. And compression fitting threads differ from flare nut threads. Sigh.