Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon


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Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/22/2008 20:52:35 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon

Jason Luttmer
(crimsonshadow7) - F

Locale: North East
Wow on 04/23/2008 04:39:59 MDT Print View

I have seen the result of a forest fire, at Philmont Scout Ranch, NM. When m crew got there in '06, it ad started to grow in, but it touched me in a way that few things do.

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Great Article on 04/23/2008 06:05:35 MDT Print View

Another great article guys...

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Recon on 04/23/2008 17:35:42 MDT Print View

Jhaura, I thought I was the only Lightweight punk rock listening person on this site! Cool and hey great story too.

Now where is my TSOL record???

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/23/2008 20:21:17 MDT Print View

Thank you for a quality trip report and awareness article, Jhaura. I'm glad to see the Gatewood Tarp came along with you. I was a bit suprised to see you all using such fragile gear in such rugged circumstances. Were there any failures?

J W
(jhaura) - M

Locale: www.Trailability.com
Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/23/2008 20:38:05 MDT Print View

Thanks for the comments guys!

Ken: Yeah! TSOL, Minor Threat and that Australian band with a female singer I can't remember...

Sam: Thanks again for the Gatewood, I've put it to good use! As you know silnylon is bomber against abrasion and punctures (relative to other ul fabrics I guess :)) so the packs and shelters handled in top form, except mine. My pack was spinnaker and took a couple flesh wounds. I wish I had worn pants, because my legs were tattered from the brush, but I can't stand hiking in pants. Rik makes all his own gear, so he does not care if it gets beat, he has lots of time and materials to produce on demand for himself. Having a lightweight load was extremely beneficial for the agility and balance we gained, and I wouldn't have given that up for stronger gear unless it was on a regular basis that I went bushwacking.

Edited by jhaura on 04/23/2008 20:39:10 MDT.

Will Rietveld
(WilliWabbit) - MLife

Locale: Southwest Colorado
Great read! on 04/24/2008 08:37:46 MDT Print View

Jhaura and companions - great read and a very worthy mission. I wanted to amplify the benefits of backpacking as a Forest Service Volunteer Wilderness Ranger. Its a great combination - it combines interacting with other hikers, testing your gear, and enjoying the wilderness at the same time - more of a sense of purpose for being there.

I have been a FS volunteer for 10 years now. Our program is coordinated by a non-profit that works cooperative with the FS and BLM in southern Colorado. Our job is not to find violators and issue citations, but to inform, educate, and assist hikers on the trails to help them avoid citations and lessen their impacts. My wife and I love doing this together; it slows me down and gives us more of an opportunity to meet and talk with other hikers. Our packs are sometimes heavier on the trip out, with trash we have picked up. We can tell some amazing stories of people's adventures and misadventures in the wilderness!

Best,
Will

Andrew Richardson
(arichardson6) - F

Locale: North East
Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/24/2008 09:15:42 MDT Print View

This was a pretty awesome read. One thing that really peaked my interest was the paid backcountry ranger position. I remember happening upon this at the end of 'On The Road.' Though I don't know if he was paid for it...

How does one go about getting one of these positions? Any special degree needed? Is it at the top of the ladder or the bottom? Anyone know where can I learn more about this?

Margaret Snyder
(jetcash) - F

Locale: Southern Arizona
backcountry ranger on 04/24/2008 10:00:38 MDT Print View

Andrew: Go to usajobs.com and search for backcountry ranger or any other keywords that would fit what you're interested in. Each job has its own qualifications and salary. It's a pretty good database.

Edited by jetcash on 04/24/2008 10:01:14 MDT.

George Matthews
(gmatthews) - MLife
Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/24/2008 10:06:30 MDT Print View

Very interesting application of light backpacking.

You and your team are brave souls.

Thanks for your valuable, unselfish service to the USFS.

Nathan Auck
(auckjam) - MLife

Locale: Wasatch
I love it! on 04/25/2008 23:11:59 MDT Print View

I really appreciate the breadth of knowledge that backpacking light provides. I am pleasantly surprised every time I log on and see another interesting application, viewpoint or mindset involving going light. Thanks for another job well done and keep up the great work!

Gustav Bostrom
(gusbo) - MLife

Locale: Scandinavia
Re: Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/27/2008 16:06:34 MDT Print View

I'm also interested in the durability of the Whisper pack (I'm thinking of buying one.). Where you able to repair the pack yourself? Does duct-tape work or sewing involved?Sending the pack to Gossamer Gear for repair is not really an option for me as the international shipping would cost almost as much as a new pack.

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 04/27/2008 16:54:03 MDT Print View

Gustav,

Duct tape does not adhere to silicon impregnated fabric like silnylon and spinnaker.

BPL sells McNett
SilFix Fabric Repair Kit
... I have not used it but IME McNett products seem to be good.

Or you could pack a few silnylon scraps and some Silicone glue repackaged in one of BPL's small rigid containers (or other containers) ... I think you might need to clean out that container after each trip and repack it before the next.

I hesitate to speak about the durability of the Whisper or other very light packs because it varies so much with the user. But if you decide to not risk it, there are similar sized packs made with tougher material that are not so heavy (ULA Relay is one)

Scott Bentz
(scottbentz) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Packing out trash on 04/29/2008 17:47:05 MDT Print View

Will wrote: "Our packs are sometimes heavier on the trip out, with trash we have picked up. We can tell some amazing stories of people's adventures and misadventures in the wilderness!"

I pack a lot with our scout troop. One of the leaders started the habit of carrying a trash bag to pack out trash. The scouts take turns carrying the trash bag each day. It's amazing what people leave behind. Hopefully, it will rub off on the kids when they later go out on their own.

Scott

J W
(jhaura) - M

Locale: www.Trailability.com
Re: Fire and Ultralight, a US Forest Service Recon on 05/03/2008 09:26:04 MDT Print View

In case you missed it, there is also a nice album of photos from this trip (with pictures of the floorless One Tent!):

http://picasaweb.google.com/jhaura/LitehikerSRecon

--Jhaura