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David Wills
(willspower3) - F
Lightest WPB fabric available to us on 03/06/2008 13:47:22 MST Print View

Hey, i was wandering what the lightest WPB fabric available to MYOG folks is. I was thinking it would probably be a tyvek or propore type thing with an obscure product number or something. I have been hard pressed to find what I'm looking for. thanks

John Kays
(johnk) - M

Locale: SoCal
fabric choice on 03/06/2008 14:30:39 MST Print View

David,

I agree with you regarding the Tyvek. Have been using safety clothing for raingear for several years and have had great results with it. When you combine its water repellency and lightweight with the low cost of the material, I am baffled at its absence from the lightweight gear scene, especially as a shelter.

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
where can you buy tyvek? on 03/06/2008 14:57:42 MST Print View

I was wondering where to get tyvek from. I want to see how it would work for a trap. I am looking for it...cheap!

John Kays
(johnk) - M

Locale: SoCal
where to buy? on 03/06/2008 15:03:12 MST Print View

Kyle, try calling Dupont direct. Surely they can put you in contact with a wholesaler or retailer.

Steven Bergeron
(TheTurk) - M

Locale: SF Bay Area
Re: where can you buy tyvek? on 03/06/2008 18:04:43 MST Print View

Kitebuilder sells Type 1443:

http://www.kitebuilder.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/24_162/products_id/666?osCsid=b98758213e8dbd6cbaf7e3b9ef5f2857


For technical information and a detailed description of the various types:

http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek/en_US/tech_info/test_results.html

http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek/en_US/assets/downloads/tyvek_handbook.pdf

Jeremy Cleaveland
(jeremy11) - F

Locale: Exploring San Juan talus
Lightest WPB fabric available to us on 03/06/2008 18:53:34 MST Print View

So, is tyvek actually considered WPB?

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Re: Re: where can you buy tyvek? on 03/07/2008 07:44:59 MST Print View

Using Tyvek... lot's of places to get it...

Here are some links from my archive...

Into The Wind: Tyvek 1422R
Quest Outfitters - Tyvek 1443 (1.25 oz)
Hang-em High - Tyvek 14
Tyvek® Lab Coats with Pockets - US Plastic Corporation (surprisingly rain resistant)
Backpacker Camper - Tyvek Ground Cloths and Ponchos
AGG - TYVEK - Tyvek Ground Cloth - by the foot

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
how to buy on 03/07/2008 08:39:43 MST Print View

Is tyvek something that you buy by the yard, or linear foot? And if its by the linear foot, how does that compare to yards?

Casey Bowden
(clbowden) - MLife

Locale: Berkeley Hills
Tyvek Rain Gear, Question to John Kays on 03/07/2008 09:01:25 MST Print View

John,

Can you provide specific links to Tyvek products you've been using as rain gear?

Thanks

Casey

John Kays
(johnk) - M

Locale: SoCal
where to buy? on 03/07/2008 09:49:14 MST Print View

Casey,

I purchased a box of 25 pairs of Tyvek pants from Grainger.com about 8 or 9 years ago and had been wearing the original pair I first pulled out of the box until I walked through some brushy trail a year ago turning the pants into instant graffiti below the knee. My son walking ahead of me wearing a previously unused pair survived without any apparent damage. Based on this experience, I would restrict use of Tyvek safety clothing as raingear to fairly wide open trail, or buy them in bulk like I have done and use them as disposable gear, as intended.

I also have a couple of Tyvek lab coats that I use occasionally as rain protection. These were obtained as free samples directly from DuPont I believe.

I am not that enthusiastic about Tyvek as rain gear anymore due mainly to the fact that safety gear is not cut appropriately for wearing it for several hours down the trail. It is great stuff as far as breathability and water repellency but the pants slide down unless supported by suspenders or some other device and the lab jacket is not cut so that it will keep water out in heavy rain combined with wind. If manufactured specifically for the purpose of using it as outdoor gear then it would be a good choice keeping in mind the above admonition regarding brush. Additionally I have found Dri-Ducks and Rain Shield to be great products at such low cost that it is not worth it to me to fiddle with the Tyvek anymore.

However, Tyvek would, in my opinion, make a fantastic material to be used for a tent. We usually don't drag out tents through brush and thorn bushes so durability is not an issue. It breathes well along with being light weight and low cost. Where is the downside here?

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
tarp application on 03/07/2008 10:32:16 MST Print View

Any one see why tyvek wouldn't work for a tarp? Will it hold up to the tension? And, has anyone ever sewed through this stuff?

Casey Bowden
(clbowden) - MLife

Locale: Berkeley Hills
Tyvek for Raingear on 03/07/2008 11:03:03 MST Print View

John,

Thanks for the info. I currently use a set of 4-year old Rain Shield pants and jacket. The jacket is in great shape but the butt of the pants are dotted with tape. I didn't want a Tyvek jacket but thought the pants would be more durable than the Rain Shield material. Perhaps on my next trip to the Sierras I'll just sleep under stars but bring a Tyvek sheet to cover up with just in case.

Casey

Rain gear for 2006 trip from Sonora Pass to Tuolumne Meadows.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Re: where to buy? on 03/07/2008 13:38:05 MST Print View

"I purchased a box of 25 pairs of Tyvek pants from Grainger.com about 8 or 9 years ago and had been wearing the original pair I first pulled out of the box until I walked through some brushy trail a year ago turning the pants into instant graffiti below the knee. My son walking ahead of me wearing a previously unused pair survived without any apparent damage. Based on this experience, I would restrict use of Tyvek safety clothing as raingear to fairly wide open trail, or buy them in bulk like I have done and use them as disposable gear, as intended."

Er... wouldn't an 8-9 year life before disposal make them essentially non-disposable?

Oh, you can also pickup a different cut of another manufacturers (aka not dupont so not technically tyvek) tyvek from http://www.sportshell.com/

marianne sites
(firefire) - F
Re: Lightest WPB fabric available to us on 06/04/2009 15:46:53 MDT Print View

...I buy Tyvek by the yard at some art supply stores in the canvas-by-the-yard sections.
(It's used to back the stretched canvas once the canvas it's stretched and stapled on to the frame.)
I'm wondering if home improvement stores would have it--although that might be printed with logo. When a house goes up, you see it stapled onto the outside walls as a moisture barrior before the siding goes up.
I imagine a creative person could use the tyvek mailers from the P.O. that are complimentary (9x12")...!
The question about Dupont..might they have outlet store at manufacturing sights? (Maybe they're not in the U.S.)
Another thought...would printers who print logo on it for whomever, have roll-end left-overs?
The lightest weight fabric I have ever seen is called 'ghost nylon'--it literally whispers against your skin..an outdoor-wear store is using it in a vest right now, with grey trim. I would love to have a light sleeping bag made out of it!
I gather up the cheap yardage at the local superstore (you know, the one that's too huge to hike through..) You won't believe this but I bought the thin Dupont fabric at $1. a yard that the slippery 'stuff sacks' are made of..you know, the orange ones--but my fabric is gray. It was a close-out fabric. I find fabric that are monopolized at a national chain fabric store, too..in the close-out section.
I'm a fabric connosieur, so after I bought ALL 0f that (sorry folks) I bought whole bolts of the very super thin lightweight ripstop nylon until I had 60 or 70 yards. Same price, $1.00/yd. Some was white, some foggy-clear, some pine green, some tan.
This is rain resistant and dries quick and thin enough to make a tent you can fold up into your pocket--well, a safari pocket (6x6x1/2"). That Dupont stuff, though, will even hold and haul water...amazing stuff.
As for sewing, yes you can sew Tyvek. Use slick paint to seal the seams...it's one buck, dries flexible,comes in colors, and can be put in the washer and drier. It was introduced as a T-shirt decorating 3-D paint. You can also use this to spread on tool handles for a better and softer grip.It's in craft stores.
Tyvek, when bent-up enough, eventually will become porous and leak, whereas, nylon and polyester ripstop won't.
Have a look at fabrics used for umbrellas, too, they dry quickly. Pocket-sized 'reflective' blankets made of chome-like 'mylar' (about 4x6') can also be connected into larger sections by using double-stick hem tape* found in your fabric stores.
There are also flexible fabric glues for the nylon things you're making if you don't want to sew, or if you literally want to make something during your adventure on-the-spot.
Luck to you..

Roleigh Martin
(marti124) - MLife

Locale: Moderator-JohnMuirTrail Yahoo Group
Re: Re: Re: where can you buy tyvek? on 06/04/2009 17:42:19 MDT Print View

more links to other tyvek vendors:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/20310/index.html

Gerry Nance
(MidnightSun) - F
Lab Safety Clothing on 02/26/2010 08:41:00 MST Print View

Look into disposable Tyvek lab clothing (Sizes to 5XL)

Prices are by EA=each and CS=case. Very affordable $10 ea.

You can buy two coveralls and then cut and modify to suit your needs.

Tyvek tape is found in construction supply stores.

http://www.labsafety.com/LAB-SAFETY-SUPPLY-Tyvek-Deluxe-Disposable-Coveralls-with-Hood-and-Elastic-Wr_24532573/?Ne=236

Matt Besek
(besek7000) - F
Something more durable? on 09/22/2011 06:58:49 MDT Print View

Recommendations for something a little more durable, but still has the same type of properties?

Edited by besek7000 on 09/22/2011 07:03:08 MDT.