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Make Your Own Gear: Titanium Snow Stakes
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Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Boilerplate on 02/17/2008 13:53:53 MST Print View

Hi Al

> I understand that you find axes are necessary to break through the boilerplate, but once you're through why not excavate a hole with a plastic or metal shovel, lay the light, cheap fabric anchor in place and fill hole with snow/ice?

Sounds good, but the maths doesn't work and the physics is uncertain. When you factor in the weight of an axe plus the weight of a plastic or metal shovel, you find you are carrying far more weight than a few titanium stakes. We do not normally carry either of these. It's total weight that counts after all.

We would not normally need an axe to make the hole late in the afternoon. Often the snow has softened by then - although by the time I am pitching camp the stuff may be starting to freeze up again. Gets cold early. No, the big problem is in the morning. There I am with this solid block of frozen ice with a fabric anchor somewhere inside it. It's frozen solid: I would have to carry a couple of kilos of ice until the sun is warm enough to melt it.

Different snow conditions - very different.

Cheers

Ryan Hutchins
(ryan_hutchins) - F

Locale: Somewhere out there
Re: Re: Ti snow stakes on 02/17/2008 16:52:47 MST Print View

>> why not just use sticks below tree line? dig, run guy line under stick (perpendicular) bury, stomp, let set, tighten. In the am, just pull your guy cord, leave the stick and move on.
Yes, and I have done just that. Works fine.

But many of my camp sites have been well above the tree line, and what then? I have to allow for that of course.

Also, there is a problem with the 'tighten' bit. UL Spectra string (0.5 mm) does not take knots very well at all. A fixed loop is possible, but not the sort of easily tied and untied knots you would need. Been there ...<<

Yes, of course, above tree line your Ti deadmen seem a superb solution. It would be interesting to look at the weight comparison for using a bit thicker cord - trip tease or similar perhaps, or dare I say P-cord and sticks (assuming below treeline travel) and the 0.5 mm spectra w/ pickets/deadmen. It would not surprise me that you already have these numbers, if so could you share them with us? Thanks! And again, nice work.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Ti snow stakes on 02/18/2008 00:24:01 MST Print View

> It would be interesting to look at the weight comparison for using a bit thicker cord - trip tease or similar perhaps, or dare I say P-cord and sticks

Sigh - you are probably right. A thicker cord would not weigh a real lot more. Probably not worth the hassle in fact. But I have this big reel of the 150 lb 0.5 mm Spectra kite line you see, and I don't have any of the triptease line for comparison. (sorry)

One thought. I have mentioned that the Spectra line does not hold a knot very well. In practice I find that it does not tangle very easily either. This can be very useful at times.

I am experimenting with ClamCleats, which are (I think) what BPL sells with some string. They won't grip on the 0.5 mm line - yet, but we are working on that.

The company made an interesting comment to me on the holding force of the clamcleat: would you prefer the clamcleat slipped, or that the guy rope ripped off the tent? A point to ponder!

Cheers

Josh Leavitt
(Joshleavitt) - F

Locale: Ruta Locura
Titanium sheet on 02/23/2008 19:29:00 MST Print View

If any one is interested, I have about 4 sheets, 36"X48"X.020" of Al6V4 Titanium sheet. We currently have no use for these, and can let them go for a deal.

email Josh or DJ at info@titaniumgoat.com for details

Mike Bozman
(myarmisonfire) - M

Locale: BC
Cutting speed on 03/01/2012 08:39:54 MST Print View

I don't see cutting speed was mentioned in the article. Having worked extensively with ISO S materials (that include titanium alloys) speed is your enemy. For the greatest chance of success with drilling the holes set your drill press as slow as it will go. About 400 rpm from a 5mm drill is good. An oil based cutting oil will help as well. If you use a dull drill or use too little of a feed rate you can quickly work harden the material and it will become much more difficult to get your drill through. A carbide tipped masonry reground (sharpened) like a regular HSS drill will work very well and only cost a few dollars more than a decent HSS drill. My preference for materials like this is to drill the holes in a single operation and not step up drill sizes.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Cutting speed on 03/01/2012 16:53:17 MST Print View

Hi Mike

You are right, I should have mentioned that. Yes, for Ti, you cut slow and deep, to avoid work-hardening.

I do sometimes drill a pilot hole and then a final hole. I drill both quite fast. Works for me with a mill.

Reground masonary drills - an old trick! Cheaper than a solid carbide drill too. But grinding them requires a green wheel (or a diamond wheel), which few have. I find the green when very messy and don't like it. A resin-bonded diamond cup wheel is very nice.

Cheers

what not
(firestarter01)

Locale: Bay Area
Suppliers on 12/12/2012 11:47:30 MST Print View

Roger,

Where did you get the Ti? OnlineMetals.com? I ask since I have many projects in mind but haven't found a good supplier of Ti around the bay area. It seems as though it's mail order only.

Thanks for the ideas (quite sufficient in metal working so you know i'm going to do this),

Edited by firestarter01 on 12/12/2012 11:51:00 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Suppliers on 12/12/2012 14:37:17 MST Print View

Hi Matt

OnLineMetals is $$$$$
I use Titanium Joe. He has always given me very good service.

Cheers

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
re Guy ropes on 12/12/2012 14:49:32 MST Print View

> > It would be interesting to look at the weight comparison for using a bit thicker cord
> > - trip tease or similar perhaps, or dare I say P-cord and sticks
> Sigh - you are probably right. A thicker cord would not weigh a real lot more.
> Probably not worth the hassle in fact. But I have this big reel of the 150 lb 0.5 mm
> Spectra kite line you see, and I don't have any of the triptease line for comparison.

Update:

I now use 1 mm Spectra cord sheathed inside 1 mm tubular Dacron cord for the winter tent. The Dacron surface allows knots and friction. The long sheathing means the Dacron does grip the Spectra properly. The Spectra adds core strength. The end result is closer to 2 mm thickness, but very light.

I could not buy this combination at the time, so I bought the two separate cords and ran the Spectra inside the Dacron myself. I did it several metres at a time. Yeah, fiddly, but that's what MYOG is about: getting exactly what you want.

I use the smallest Clam Cleat as a toggle, next to the tent. The 2 mm cord is gripped very nicely by the cleat. By not having the cleat at the end of the line I don't get tangles, and adjusting the guy length is much easier at that height above ground too.

Cheers