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Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Make A Canister Cozy on 08/24/2005 15:19:49 MDT Print View

I use a canister stove that is the remote canister type. The canister is about 12" away from the stove. This type of canister stove solves the windscreen problem some have with the other type stove. I had made a few cozy's out of neoprene and had some of it left over. I first put the canister in one of the them. I then made a cozy for a small Snow Peak Giga Power canister.

A small bag for a camera lens gave me the idea for the draw cord. The Snow Peak Giga Power cozy weighs 1.06oz.

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If you want to make a cozy like this you can look at this picture sequence for the Fosters Beer Can Cook Pot cozy. It will show how to make a pattern and cut and sew the neoprene. Adjust your pattern to fit your canister type.

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Edited by bfornshell on 08/24/2005 15:36:13 MDT.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Thanks for the Step-by-Step on 08/25/2005 07:10:37 MDT Print View

Bill,
Thanks a lot for the pictures. I really like seeing what you've made yourself. It definitely gives me an itch to get into a house where I can have "my space" that the wife would let me tinker in.

I had a question, when cutting neoprene, I assume you just use scissors? or do you use a hot knife?

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Make a Canister Cozy on 08/25/2005 07:41:42 MDT Print View

Joshua, It doesn't take a lot of space. It is nice to have a lot of space. You can do a lot in a small space or even if you have to pack everything up in a box when you are done for the day and slide it under a bed.

I just cut the neoprene with a pair of scissors.

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Make A Canister Cozy on 08/25/2005 14:58:37 MDT Print View

Nicely done Bill!

Can you fill me in on why the canister cozy? Is it for transportation or...?

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Make a Canister Cozy on 08/25/2005 15:50:28 MDT Print View

Hi Rick, Good question. Used mostly for really cold weather.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Make a Canister Cozy on 08/25/2005 21:24:02 MDT Print View

I'm trying (and failing) to get my brain around the idea of a canister cozy for cold weather. But since I've not used a canister in the cold I suspect I'm just missing something.

Cold weather reduces the vapor pressure of the fuel and if it's cold enough it won't evaporate fuel fast enough to meet the stove's needs ... is that correct?

The act of evaporating fuel requires energy and that results in cooling the fuel and the canister. I'm somewhat confident of that.

Wouldn't insulating the canister would seem to result in a colder canister (less ability to absorb energy from surroundings)?

I guess I can see a cozy helping if the cannister were comming from a warmer environment (inside your jacket or sleeping bag).



It

Alex Orgren
(big_load) - F
Re: Re: Make a Canister Cozy on 08/26/2005 00:27:12 MDT Print View

I have the same question. The release of fuel cools the canister quickly, even if it started out warm and is insulated.

The two most effective techniques I know of to counteract this are:

1. Placing the canister in water (even cold water) while in use.
2. Using a wire as a heat exchanger. Wrap one end a few times around the canister and put the other in or near the flame. Diligently monitor the canister to avoid overheating.

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Make a Canister Cozy on 08/26/2005 01:23:06 MDT Print View

If I am backpacking in cold weather and need to melt ice or snow for water I use one of those small chemical heat packs in the cozy. They are simple to use and light. When I am finished melting water or cooking I put the heat pack in a pocket or a mitten or if I have my sleeping bag out I put it in a sock and throw it in the bag.

Alex Orgren
(big_load) - F
Re: Make a Canister Cozy on 08/26/2005 13:42:21 MDT Print View

Interesting. I think the combined elements might be heavier overall than the wire, but maybe it has a performance advantage. Have you compared them?

By the way, I've really enjoyed the pictures of your creations.

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Make a Canister Cozy on 08/26/2005 15:19:24 MDT Print View

Alex, I am talking real cold, middle of the winter Mt Washington, cold.

I carry a few "Grabber MyCoal - Mini-Mini Hand Warmers" (at 1.38oz for 2) with me always - anyway. They are great when your fingers get cold. Yes, I have great Mit's and liners but you know what they say about **** happens.

The cozy in the picture will also fit my Snow Peak 700ml Ti cup.

Edited by bfornshell on 08/26/2005 15:20:55 MDT.

barry hitchcock
(lentenrose) - F
make a canister cozy on 09/05/2005 18:26:29 MDT Print View

i made a prototype cosy for my snow peak mini solo from an old closed cell sleep mat--seems to work ok----is neoprene a better material to use?