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Steve Young
(shakeylegs) - F
Need silnylon sewing tips on 08/22/2005 14:27:48 MDT Print View

Though I've made many pieces of gear with my pfaff 1229 I am batting zero with silnylon - the first time I've attempted to sew with it. Nothing too tricky, just a simple straight seam for starters. Only I can't get started.

The machine has a walking foot which I'm using, and still I can get virtually no purchase on the fabric. As I attempt to stitch, the nylon dances about happily doing a kind of Irish jig. The bottom feed and walking foot do not want to grab hold of the fabric.

I've played with the tension as I thought that might be inhibiting the movement of the fabric -- tension too tight and the stich width is miniscule and bunched, too loose and the bobbin snags.

Tips for sewing with this mysterious stuff before I waltz off to the sewing machine repair?

Steve

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
sewing silnylon on 08/22/2005 15:46:46 MDT Print View

Silnylon presents a lot of challenges. A walking foot is alleged to make it easier. Have you tried adjusting the downward pressure on the foot?

It might also be productive to ask at thru-hiker

Steve Young
(shakeylegs) - F
Re: sewing silnylon on 08/22/2005 16:50:57 MDT Print View

Jim,
I have not tried adjusting the downward pressure of the walking foot, in fact, I'm not sure there is such an adjustment but I will look.
Thanks

Brett Tucker
(blister-free) - F

Locale: Puertecito ruins
sewing sil-nylon on 08/22/2005 21:31:47 MDT Print View

Actually, a walking foot is not necessary in order to get good sewing results with silicone nylon. I'd suggest switching to a standard foot and see if that helps to equalize the friction on either side of the fabric. Also, since Pfaff are heavy-duty industrial machines, yours may be naturally disinclined to sew ultra-thin fabrics. How about the condition of the feed dogs? And what about the bobbin tension - have you adjusted it to match the upper tension?

Once you've got everything in sync, sewing becomes the easiest part of the process. Handling and aligning the slippery sil-nylon fabric never gets easy!

Edited by blister-free on 08/22/2005 21:36:18 MDT.

Ron Moak
(rmoak) - F
Re: Need silnylon sewing tips on 08/22/2005 23:36:00 MDT Print View

Steve,

I believe you can adjust the pressure on your foot, though I'm not sure how. I also have a Phaff and fortunately have never needed to adjust it for foot pressure. It’s probably something that needs to be done inside the case.

I'd suggest you take your machine in to a local dealer who's capable of doing proper service. Also take with you the thread you’re using along with a bunch of scraps of silicone nylon. That way the machine can be properly setup to correctly handle your needs.

Once the machine is properly setup I don’t believe you’ll have much of a problem. I sew lots of Silicone Nylon and for the most part keep the walking foot engaged. I’m able to sew long strait lines with minimal slippage without using pins. With sufficient practice so will you.

Ron

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: sewing sil-nylon on 08/23/2005 01:08:38 MDT Print View

Steve,

FYI, just in case you don't already know. Mr. Moak knows what he is talking about. I've purchased gear from him. MASTER craftsman he is. Top-notch workmanship (and designs). He recently won one of BPL's Lightitude Awards for his Lunar Solo e shelter.

Mr. Moak,

Congrats on the Lightitude Award. If I'm not just usiing a bivy for shelter, then it's your Lunar Solo e. I love mine. Haven't used another tent since you were kind enough to make a Lunar Solo e for me.

Edited by pj on 08/23/2005 01:11:01 MDT.

Steve Young
(shakeylegs) - F
re: silnylon tips on 08/23/2005 17:32:35 MDT Print View

Thanks all for your input. I've hoisted the old 1229 up and crawled underneath. No immediately recognizable adjustments for the walking foot and feed dogs seem ok if perhaps a hair below the face plate.

With the outside off and innards exposed, there is what appears to be a cam adjustment for the feed dog height and I'm summoning the courage to tease it. Then I'll probably be off to the sewing shop for the 50k tuneup.

One of the first projects I ever made with this machine, way way back, was a mylar vest that makes me look like michael jackson on a bad hair day (but very warm at 2 oz). That stuff, some kind of sandwiched aluminized mylar scrim, was very thin and I had no problems handling it. My guess is machine adjustment will solve the silnylon problem.

Again, thanks all.
Steve

Steve Young
(shakeylegs) - F
re: silnylon tips on 08/23/2005 17:50:19 MDT Print View

Thanks all for your input. I've hoisted the old 1229 up and crawled underneath. No immediately recognizable adjustments for the walking foot and feed dogs seem ok if perhaps a hair below the face plate.

With the outside off and innards exposed, there is what appears to be a cam adjustment for the feed dog height and I'm summoning the courage to tease it. Then I'll probably be off to the sewing shop for the 50k tuneup.

One of the first projects I ever made with this machine, way way back, was a mylar vest that makes me look like michael jackson on a bad hair day (but very warm at 2 oz). That stuff, some kind of sandwiched aluminized mylar scrim, was very thin and I had no problems handling it. My guess is machine adjustment will solve the silnylon problem.

Again, thanks all.
Steve

Douglas Frick
(Otter) - MLife

Locale: Wyoming
Re: re: silnylon tips on 08/24/2005 20:28:06 MDT Print View

Ray Jardine's suggestions may be useful. They helped me (my wife and I sewed a Ray-Way quilt).

http://www.ray-way.com/sewing-tips/index.shtml

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Need silnylon sewing tips on 08/26/2005 04:29:24 MDT Print View

Pin the hems together carefully.

Hand feed the needle into the fabric for the first two stitches, then maintain tension on the fabric (front and back) and sort of help feed it through, under tension.

Short stitches, light tension, finest needle, and a 100 or 120 grade thread. Ordinary domestic thread is a bit thick.

Steve Young
(shakeylegs) - F
re: sewing silnylon zipidydoda on 08/27/2005 12:13:40 MDT Print View

Well, a quick trip to the sewing machine repairman revealed a prominent, forgotten, feed adjustment. Darned if my pfaff doesnt have a darning setting that when engaged allows fabric to move about under the needle as if dancing an irish jig!

Now I'm tempted to suggest that my wife may have left the machine set up as such but that would be irresponsile and unkind. Blushingly I take responsiblity to report that aliens seem to have inhabited my machine. Fortunately the repairman was able to exorcise them.

That slick silnylon now glides effortlessly through the feed without even a pucker. Yippee!

Blushing red
Steve