Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?)


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Kenneth Reppart
(kreppart) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?) on 01/08/2008 17:58:12 MST Print View

I’m a 6’2” active sleeper and a bit claustrophobic so when I bought my first bag a few years ago the primary consideration was that the bag is roomy. I can’t imagine anything warmer or more comfortable than my Big Agnes but it’s 3 ½ pounds and I am looking for something lighter.

When I say active I really mean acrobatic, throughout the night I’ll cycle through my back, stomach, side, fetal position, you name it. I can’t stand to lie in my wife’s mummy bag for more than a couple of minutes – I just need more room. But how to get more room and still reduce the weight?

I think that a quilt paired with a lightweight bivy sack may be a good combination. The bivy would retain some extra warmth around the quilt when I’m thrashing. It would provide extra protection from the weather which would allow me to eventually go with a smaller/lighter tarp.

Quilts
I’d like to get a nicer down quilt but rather than spend $400 on an Arc Alpinist I think I’ll sew my own Ray Way quilt with the draft stopper edges. If memory serves that kit is under $100 and should be almost 2 pounds lighter. Are there any other quilts that I should take a look at that are good for starting out?

Bivies
On the bivy side my concern is size – most of them seem to be pretty heavily tapered for mummy users. Which UL bivy sacks are the largest? I read a couple reviews that said the Equinox bivy is fairly large. I suppose I could make one but if there are other options I’d at least like to consider them.

Obviously any comments or suggestions by other active sleepers would be greatly appreciated.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?) on 01/08/2008 18:52:17 MST Print View

Ken,
You can have everything you are asking for all in one quilt and ditch the bivy all together.

It would be a down quilt with no stiches on top and have synthetic insulation on top to protect the down from dampness.

Using one layer of Thru-hikers Prequilted Primaloft One and Momentium on the exterior you would have a down quilt that would give you as good of moisture protection as you can get.

The first step making the quilt would be to sew the baffles to what would be the underside of the
Prequilted Primaloft One to the fabric you would use on the inside of the quilt. Then fill and sew the down into each space.

Then all you have to do is sew the top and bottom fabric together with the Pre-quilt and you're done.

I have tested this theory to see if the down would be compressed under the pre-quilt and the loss of loft is very very minimal, (maybe 1/8").

I am going to make the quilt I am talking to you about in about a month.
I have a lot of hikes and outings I do that are in wet or dewy conditions that a 30* quilt like this would be perfect to complete my collection.

Edited by awsorensen on 01/10/2008 18:36:27 MST.

s k
(skots) - F
Re: Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?) on 01/08/2008 19:17:39 MST Print View

Aaron,

Great idea for a MYO quilt. Any idea on the choice of interior
fabric?

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?) on 01/08/2008 23:10:45 MST Print View

I use Momentium for everything now.
The only down side to it is that if you catch it hard enough on something it tears a lot worse than 1.1 nylon.

I just didn't mention anything about the interior fabric because you have the option to use what ever you want.

Edited by awsorensen on 01/10/2008 18:35:30 MST.

Kenneth Reppart
(kreppart) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Sleep system for tall, active sleepers (quilt+bivy?) on 01/14/2008 00:23:29 MST Print View

Aaron I like the idea but my working premise is that a bivy will trap some warmer air around me so when I toss & turn and get cold air under my quilt it will be slightly less cold.