What are your sleeping bag(s) for different temps?
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Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
Possibly to make my own quilt. on 01/03/2008 12:40:50 MST Print View

Actually, I think I will have the GF make me a quilt as I have about 5 yards of momentum laying around with six ounces of 800 and six ounces of 927 and she owes me. How should I do the bottomo though? I think that the JRB drawcord style might be the best. I am then thinking of putting a zipper on the long side so I can zip it up if need be with its 60" width. I think then if I put a drawstring on the top it will help to cover my shoulders and I could just wear a light balaclava and or Nunatak's. 2" baffles should do the job if I overstuff them the slightest.

John Mackey
(JohnMackey) - F
Re: What are your sleeping bag(s) for different temps? on 01/03/2008 14:17:40 MST Print View

I now like to always carry more sleeping bag than I think I probably need, having discovered over the years that it is better to carry a few extra ounces of sleeping bag to insure a good night's sleep rather than skimp on weight here. I usually go lighter on the insulating clothing than most people, finding that I seldom need much beyond my hiking clothing and rain gear when I'm actually hiking (I do carry Mont-Bell Inner Down Jacket when I expect temperatures below freezing and I always have warm rain mittens and a good hat too). When I'm not hiking, if I get cold I simply start hiking again or if in camp just get into my sleeping bag.

So which bags do I currently use?

40 degrees and up--Nunatak Ghost--16.2 ounces on my scale

30 to 50 degrees--Go-Lite FeatherLite--20.1 ounces on my scale (1.1 ounces above spec) plus a Nunatak Down Balaclava at the lower temperature range--3.6 ounces on my scale

15 to 35 degrees--Marmot Helium--31.5 ounces on my scale (2.5 ounces above spec) plus a Nunatak Down Balaclava at the lower temperature range

0 to 20 degrees--Feathered Friends Snowbunting with Nano shell--38.0 ounces on my scale (6 ounces below spec) plus a Nunatak Down Balaclava

My FF Snowbunting is truly an awesome bag and I highly recommend it to people looking for a very lightweight 0 to 20 degree bag (the shell material needs to be their lightest option, currently the Nano I think, if you want to keep the total weight down). I also highly recommend the Nunatak Down Balaclava. The old adage about keeping one's head warm is really true and I think ounce for ounce this piece of equipment creates more warmth for me than any other that I own and creates great sleeping bag warmth and provided it isn't raining and you don't mind looking dorky, great warmth in camp too.

Edited by JohnMackey on 01/03/2008 14:57:45 MST.

charlie babbage
(babbage) - F
Re: Re: What are your sleeping bag(s) for different temps? on 01/03/2008 14:25:25 MST Print View

http://www.srh.noaa.gov/productview.php?pil=MRXRTPMRX&version=3&max=25

http://www2.nature.nps.gov/air/webcams/parks/grsmpkcam/grsmpkcam.cfm

Here are two places to check mountain temps for GSMNP.

I use an Alpinlite for colder (with a homemade bivy) and a homemade quilt for the rest. If I lived in an area that had colder temps I would definately have another system to cover that range. I can go year round without problems as long as I avoid the higher elevations.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: What are your sleeping bag(s) for different temps? on 01/03/2008 18:27:03 MST Print View

For 40*
I have a homemade quilt with .85 ounce fabric Thru-hiker used to sell. It is now my bag I use when I have to say over-night at work. It has no DWR and any condensation or dew wets out the bag horribly.

35*
My Marmut Pounder is my Adventure Racing bag or for very wet conditions. With a layer of 2.5 ounce Climashield added, it weighs 23 ounces, but has the 15d fabric that is really nice. The new version has the Astral N-100 fabric.

15*
TNF Hightail. Although it's rated for 15* it may be good for 20* but only I eat a few thousand calories before I go to sleep.

0-5*
My Home-made 2 pound quilt. I'm sure it will keep me warm down to 10*, 5* with some good clothing and 0* with a good meal.
It also weighs less than the TNF bag so if it's going to be blow 40* the quilt goes with me. It's adjustability is a lot better than a bag but the quilt is just too warm above 35*, even when wearing underwear and a t-shirt.
It does works good with a light base layer and your legs outside with the top of the bottom just draped over.

If I was going to go hiking in 0* temps, I could easily push my quilt to -10* with all of my clothing on and my Exped Down mat. Not bad for 2 lbs.

If it is going to be below 35* I will use my prolite 3 short along with 2 GG 60" long 1/8" pads. Other than that it is just a pad or 2. I will never sleep in a camp with hard ground so I have only slept a few nights that my back was stiff the next morning.

Looks like I need to make a 32* quilt though.
I think I'll actually be making a 5 ounce and a 2.5 ounce Climashield quilt since most of the hikes I do have a lot of condensation.

Well, ok, I'll also make a 32* hodded down quilt that will weight about 19 ounces.

Edited by awsorensen on 01/03/2008 18:35:58 MST.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Sleeping bags over temperature gradient on 01/03/2008 19:42:32 MST Print View

WM Summerlite down to high 20's with a Cocoon Hoody for backup. WM Ultralite with 2 oz. of overfill with Cocoon Hoody for backup down to ~10 degrees, although I've yet to go below high teens. Roasty toasty so far.

John Adams
(scsjohn) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Sleeping bag system on 01/04/2008 13:57:45 MST Print View

Thanks for all the ideas and suggestions. For simplicity's sake (and after reading through many of your ideas), I am thinking about just having the two:

JRB No Sniveller (Long) for temps over 40 deg F
WM Alpinlite (Long) for temps between 10-40 deg F
Combining the two for temps below 10 deg F

The weight of both would be about 58 ounces--6 ounces more than the EMS Mountain 0--NOT ultralite, and maybe not even lightweight, and yet offers the simplicity of only keeping up with two sleepings.

What are your thoughts on this? I have created the backing for the Sniveller that would make this do-able.

Here are two pictures: One comparing the EMS with the Alpinlite inside the Sniveller and the second is the underside of the Sniveller.

comparison of WM/JBR to EMS 0

Piece of Nylon omnitaped to JBR