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Thoughts on This Tent Idea
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Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
Thoughts on This Tent Idea on 12/03/2007 18:10:28 MST Print View

Does anyone see why this design wouldn't work? It's going to be made out of Silnylon, and the poles are going to be my Leki hiking poles.Google SketchUp Rough Draft


It is 4ft high at highest peak, with 6'6" fully covered for sleeping. The front is so high because it is made as a vestibule for me to sit under during rain. The back is low to save weight because I don't need the room near the "foot box".

Let me know about any questions. Thanks!

Edited by dufus934 on 12/03/2007 18:18:06 MST.

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
Re: Thoughts on This Tent Idea on 12/03/2007 18:27:14 MST Print View

Here's a better pic of the tent with the measurements.Tent design w/measurements

Edited by dufus934 on 12/03/2007 18:28:47 MST.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Re: Thoughts on This Tent Idea on 12/03/2007 18:41:55 MST Print View

That's not so different from this

A tad shorter and somewhat lower at the foot.

Paul Tree
(Paul_Tree) - F

Locale: Wowwww
catenary curve on 12/03/2007 20:22:06 MST Print View

a curve in the fabric takes out some of the looseness.catenary

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
longer is better on 12/26/2007 13:19:43 MST Print View

may it's just me but i think 6'6" is really tight. i'm 6'2" so maybe i'm taller than you?? i like 9' ridges, yeah it's long but i never have to worry about the weather. I like ultralight that still works. It doesn't matter how light it is if you're soaked.

Edited by MarshLaw303 on 12/26/2007 13:20:42 MST.

Mike Hinsley
(ArchNemesis)

Locale: England, UK
Designs on 01/01/2008 11:35:12 MST Print View

Seriously consider putting a door on the front and/or back. I've found that a door gives better weather protection for weight than the extra fabric required to do the equivalent as just tarp.

I've done a lot of tarp camping this year in the UK and so have weather tested lots of designs.

A closed end is the minimum weatherproof design:

Ultralight Small Solo Tarp

Simple with doors both ends here:

Ultralight Solo Tarp/Tent

I've also started to use a mixture of toggles and velcro for door closures because of weight and simplicity.

I've not worried about caternary ridges too much - a decent bit of tension in the guy ropes is often good enough...

I'm 6ft tall and I've found that although a 2.5mx1.8m flat tarp will weather a storm if pitched low and in shelter it is far from a fun way to spend a night. A shaped tarp with doors weighs less and gives more weather protection.

I also must declare that I match the tarp to the weather - if good weather is expected I take a smaller and lighter tarp...

Edited by ArchNemesis on 01/01/2008 12:55:52 MST.

Kyle Purcell
(dufus934) - F

Locale: North Texas
Finished on 02/28/2008 11:42:00 MST Print View

It took me forever, because I got busy, but I finished this tent!!! It really is an awesome tent for my first project. The only bad thing about it is that I found out the the fabric that I'm using is really a ripstop nylon with a DWR finish on it. However, I am still real pleased with the design, and I am probably going to put a door, bug netting, and tie-out loops on the tent. I just want to completely finish this project that has really turned into a prototype. Thanks for the input, and I'll try to get a pic or two up, but my camera is out of comission right now.

peter kvamme
(karacolor) - F

Locale: midwest
Re: prototype on 02/29/2008 22:50:57 MST Print View

I have had several projects turn into prototypes, and every time the next version turns out better. Aside from realizing things you could have done better, I find the whole process much easier the second time around.
Good luck on the next edition, looking forward to photos.