Forum Index » GEAR » Boot Sizing


Display Avatars Sort By:
Scott Smith
(mrmuddy) - M

Locale: No Cal
Boot Sizing on 11/18/2007 18:14:22 MST Print View

Have read many views on how to get correct fit.

Latest .. Have your foot measured . with one of those Branackton (sp?) devices.. Then add 1/2 size.. e.g. if you measure 9 buy a 9 1/2 boot.

Any comments ?? Generally .. does this work ? Thanks !!

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Boot Sizing on 11/19/2007 04:23:20 MST Print View

Scott,

When trying on a boot do as follows:

Step into the boot and slide your foot all the way forward untill your toes touch the front of the boot. Than the full width of your finger should fit between your heel and the boot. That should be the right size for you.

Now put on the boot as you would do normally. See if your heel stays in places when walking; it should not rise out of the boot (a rise of a few milimeter at most). Now see if you can wiggle all of your toes; they should not be touching the front of the shoe. Lastly, stand or rather walk on a decline with your toes pointing downwards; toes should still not touch the front of the shoe. Try this with as many shoes as possible. From the few shoes that meet all the three criteria, choose the most comfortable ones. Pray that they will still be comfortable after 200 miles.

Eins

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Boot Sizing on 11/19/2007 13:00:55 MST Print View

> Step into the boot and slide your foot all the way forward untill your toes touch the front of the boot. Than the full width of your finger should fit between your heel and the boot. That should be the right size for you.
> Now put on the boot as you would do normally. See if your heel stays in places when walking; it should not rise out of the boot (a rise of a few milimeter at most). Now see if you can wiggle all of your toes; they should not be touching the front of the shoe. Lastly, stand or rather walk on a decline with your toes pointing downwards; toes should still not touch the front of the shoe.

Better make sure the width is enough - there are wide and narrow fittings. Too narrow = pain and blisters.

Then, when you have worked out which one suits you, ADD A HALF SIZE! Yeah, I know, whatever for? Because your feet swell when you are walking, and this does NOT show up in the shops.

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Re: Re: Boot Sizing on 11/19/2007 14:42:51 MST Print View

I disagree, Roger. H

Half a size equals to 4mm, now if I look at the width of my finger it's at least four times as large. Having a customer trying on a shoe as they normally would and adding only half a size usually resulted in them coming back with the shoe. Making sure I could put my finger between their heel and the boot didn't. I think adding one to 1,5 size is more accurate, or use your finger.

Eins

Edited by EinsteinX on 11/19/2007 14:43:31 MST.

Scott Smith
(mrmuddy) - M

Locale: No Cal
Boot Sizing on 11/20/2007 12:32:51 MST Print View

Thanks guys . for your input !

John Hopkins
(DrGonzo) - F

Locale: Southeast
Re: Boot Sizing on 11/23/2007 15:50:09 MST Print View

Here is how I find boots that fit:
1.)Use a Brannock device to estimate your foot size, and check out your feet for problems (bone spurs, narrow heel, arch height). These will be problem areas to look for.

2.)Comb the net for 4 or 5 pairs you like.

3.)Buy these boots (in a store preferably, but online will do). You MUST make sure they have a good return policy.

4.)Try on all the pairs and find what fits best. By doing this you can try on boots at your own pace and really walk around in them. Just don't get them dirty or remove the tags!

5.)Pick a pair and return the rest.

6.) Rinse and repeat.

Sirena D.
(Sirena) - F
Choosing boots on 11/23/2007 20:37:22 MST Print View

Another tip that I found helpful was to find a treadmill and put your loaded pack on with the shoes to see how they feel, this way you can walk without ruining the bottoms of the shoes.

Sirena

Shawn Basil
(Bearpaw) - F

Locale: Southeast
Boot Fitting vs Sizing on 11/24/2007 12:17:16 MST Print View

If you are lucky, you can consult an experienced bootfitter. A good one will measure both feet, both seated and standing with a Brannock Device. This allows the bootfitter to determine your natural foot shape versus your weighted foot shape. It will very quickly show if there are expansion issues due to a fallen arch, either in terms of length OR of width. Both issues are common. Also a truly experienced bootfitter will be able to determine fit issues that can't be measured by the Brannock, such as width through the instep and heel and the volume through the bridge of the foot.

Also, a good boot fitter will know the general fit characteristics of the boots in question, particularly which ones are cut wider/narrower in the heel/instep, again areas that DON'T get measured by a Brannock.

But all this is secondary to trying the footwear on an incline. One critical area nobody has mentioned is walk with the shoes on an incline. This really is a critical fit issue unless unless you only intend to hike on flat pavement.

Walking uphill exxagerates your heel movement, but you should have no more than maybe a quarter inch (5-6 mm). You can reduce this movement with a plethora of lacing techniques.

On the downhill, (which is the more critical of the two checks IMO) you should be able to walk in place without your feet sliding into the front of the shoe. A shoe that is too wide will allow such slide even if you have the right length. But if you enjoy keeping your toenails, avoid this in your boots.

If you had issues with substantial foot expansion due to a falling arch, an orthotic such as Superfeet may be helpful, and may prevent you from "toe-touching" on a downhill. However, getting a pair of shoes that truly fit your feet, both for length as well as width and general footshape is a much better solution than the host of inserts, sock thicknesses, and lacing techniques to work around a not-so-great fit.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Re: Boot Sizing on 11/24/2007 15:34:47 MST Print View

Hi Eins

> Half a size equals to 4mm, now if I look at the width of my finger it's at least four times as large. Having a customer trying on a shoe as they normally would and adding only half a size usually resulted in them coming back with the shoe. Making sure I could put my finger between their heel and the boot didn't. I think adding one to 1,5 size is more accurate, or use your finger.

I think you misunderstood me. I meant add the half size AFTER doing the finger fitting. So adding 1 to 1.5 sizes as you suggested is close to what I meant.

Fortunately, I think we both agree that shoes which are too small are BAD! VERY BAD!

Cheers

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Boot Sizing on 11/25/2007 02:23:31 MST Print View

Hey Roger,

I re-read you first post, but I think it's not clear that you agreed with me, but I'm glad you are and clearified your point. To give people an idea of proper hiking size: I normaly wear a size 10 (US), my hiking shoes are size 11,5 and vey comfortable. I only had one blister in about 500miles, but this blister was caused by my sock being too thin.

Eins

james w glenn
(bark-eater) - F
Heal slop is the bane of my sock pile on 11/25/2007 06:19:34 MST Print View

Ive got realy wide feet and a low volume heels. I buy 12EE to get my toes in boots but my heal rubs and will easly trash a pair of rag woolsocks in a non hikeing day. Ive taken to wearing the largest size cheap, thin nylon dress socks i can find over what ever socks im wearing to protect my feet. For my next pair of non disposible boots "in heavy leather" I plan on makeing friends with a cobler and haveing a narower pair of boots streatched out to fit. I would be interested in finding a really light leather boot with no lining or padding, resoleabe and with a easably replaceable supportive footbed. I used to hike/live-in a pair of high top moccasins. They where great except for the lack of ankle support. I sprained my ankle pretty good comming down hill out of the Olymic mnts...but I digress..

Mike Barney
(eaglemb) - F

Locale: AZ, the Great Southwest!
Where do you get big / wide shoes? on 11/25/2007 10:08:43 MST Print View

James,
when I saw your post, I thought of one of our local kids who shot through a size 13 - 14 --- on the way to ???
Where do you get your shoes at?

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Heal slop is the bane of my sock pile on 11/25/2007 13:31:00 MST Print View

James, why do you want a boot? Many people on these fora hike in low cut shoes very succesfully. In fact, after going to lightweight low shoes I wouldn't go back. Ankle support comes from strengthening your ankles.

Am I correct, judging from your wide feet that you are on he heavy side? (Not trying to offend you) If so, loosing some weight by doing excersises will help and strengthen your ankles at the same time, but this is just guessing.

With your wide feet, would sandals work for you? Shoes have only been around a very short time. In fact, entire Roman armies marched accross the whole of Eurpe on sandals.

Meindl tipically does a wide fit to answer your question, but they are on the heavy side and I wonder if they're available where you live (which you do not yet have in your profile). Also my experience with very wide feet is that even Meindl tends to be too narrow.

Eins