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Benjamin Smith
(bugbomb) - F - M

Locale: South Texas
Notes from the Field – Bushwacking Shell on 11/06/2007 20:12:08 MST Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Notes from the Field – Bushwacking Shell

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 00:22:15 MST Print View

Roger,

the top looks fantastic. I reckon I would get too hot in it at any time of year in SA, but it would be brilliant in Tasmania, particularly off-track like in the SW.

I am wondering what your thoughts are with using mesh for the kangaroo pocket...it will be protected from scrub, and will be airier than nylon. Also, you could unzip the pocket when you aren't carrying anything (important) in it, thus providing a small amount of additional ventilation, when not in scrub.

You've inspired me...maybe I'll get Mum to head down to Spotlight and find some nylon and a pattern with me... I like my Colombia GRT top for bushwalking, but yep, the features are over the top and in extreme scrub I have to be careful not to rip it or shear buttons off.

Cheers for some great (Aus-relevant) articles Roger!

Dan Healy
(electricpanda)

Locale: Queensland
Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 01:07:13 MST Print View

Yes Roger, once again, very practical looking gear... it is a tough gig balancing long lasting and lightweight...

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 03:33:41 MST Print View

Hi Adam

> I reckon I would get too hot in it at any time of year in SA,
Gets pretty hot in Alice Springs ...

> I am wondering what your thoughts are with using mesh for the kangaroo pocket...it will be protected from scrub, and will be airier than nylon.
Never thought of using mesh. Hum - dunno. Would the mesh rub? Mind you, in hot weather I just fully open the zip, and that lets enough air in that I don't find my chest being the hottest part of me.

> maybe I'll get Mum to head down to Spotlight and find some nylon and a pattern with me
I am hoping that we can get an MYOG article published with my pattern. Anyhow, don't forget to buy some zips at the same time.

Cheers

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 04:30:44 MST Print View

Roger, is your "practical/functional" approach to everything a common Aussie trait? Either way, it makes your posts worth reading even when I might not be interested in the topic!

I will definitely be looking forward to the MYOG article!

One question about the shell ... why not loose wrists that can be closed tight via a velcro tab? I find that to be as useful for thermal regulation as a drawcord hem and almost as useful as an adjustable neck closure.

Tony Beasley
(tbeasley) - MLife

Locale: Pigeon House Mt from the Castle
Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 15:29:52 MST Print View

Hi Roger,

Thanks for another great article.

As a regular Bushwacker I am happy with my Taslan nylon pants in most conditions but my Mountain Designs nylon travel shirt which is OK in warm/hot conditions but it is dangerous in the cold.

I also look forward to the MYOG article, I might have to learn to sew.

Tony

John McLaine
(John_McLaine) - F - M

Locale: Tasmania
rain/sleet/snow ? on 11/07/2007 16:16:28 MST Print View

It looks an excellent design Roger. Could you please expand upon your comments regarding waterproofness and performance in rain/sleet/snow?
Particularly for southwest Tassie work?

Adam Kilpatrick
(oysters) - MLife

Locale: South Australia
Re: Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/07/2007 16:30:16 MST Print View

Roger,

I guess my comment with regards to the temperature is more down to myself...even when its mid winter in the Flinders, or in Central Australia (I've walked there in July too) and its pretty cold in the mornings (maybe 5-15 Celcius) once I get walking with a pack, I start getting warm pretty quick-certainly enough for plenty of perspiration. Mind you, I sometimes walk with a much older guy (about 60) and he will still have a couple of thermals and a beanie on.

Rather than just "mozzie" netting mesh (I would say would defn irritate), there are much softer fabric meshes out there, that no doubt weigh a bit more, but are soft on the skin and still probably quite durable. Its a while since I've been to a fabric store, but I have (yes bad me) some "fashionable" pants and shirts that have this kind of mesh as pocket liners...Like the Columbia GRT pocket (on the right), and the pockets on my berghaus pants...the Berg Pants are where I got the idea from-I found leaving the cargo pocket zip open provided quite a deal of ventilation, while travelling.

Its not so much about your chest being the hottest part of you or not...it adds no extra weight (like pit zips) but could provide extra ventilation (that will help elsewhere by cooling blood down) when required for no weight gain.

I'll wait for your pattern. It will save me modifying one.

Cheers again,

Adam

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/08/2007 02:54:54 MST Print View

Hi Jim

> Roger, is your "practical/functional" approach to everything a common Aussie trait?
It's not uncommon, anyhow. :-)

> why not loose wrists that can be closed tight via a velcro tab?
Um ... well ... the problem with velcro tabs is that the leave a bit of a gap at the overlap. Otherwise - why not?

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: rain/sleet/snow ? on 11/08/2007 03:00:25 MST Print View

Hi John! Glad to see you here.

> Could you please expand upon your comments regarding waterproofness and performance in rain/sleet/snow?
Particularly for southwest Tassie work?

Well, the Taslan is not waterproof. It isn't meant to be, and attempts to make such fabrics have all failed, as I imagine you are aware.
But - it does drain very quickly. I can have a wet shell from rain, and 15 minutes later it is almost dry (assuming I am walking and pumping out some heat). This is in extreme contrast to natural fibres of course.

We wore these shells in France in rain, and sleet, and snow, with just a silnylon poncho over them. The poncho deflected the fresh icy-cold water from reaching my skin, and bottled up some body heat as well.

Is it suitable for SW Tas? Certainly!

(Try Spotlight for local availability.)

Cheers

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Bushwacking Shell on 11/08/2007 03:01:40 MST Print View

Hi Adam

> I'll wait for your pattern. It will save me modifying one.
Coming, I hope.

Cheers