M Slow Travel

by Simon Clissold

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# WORDS: 1630
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Slow travel and the philosophy behind it is nothing new; think Bashō and his bamboo staff on his ‘narrow road to the deep north’ in 1689, or Stevenson walking through the Cevennes with a donkey and a loaf of bread in 1878, or Fermor setting out in 1933 for Constantinople on foot from his home in London with little more than the clothes on his back. An abundance of time is all these men had. What they did not have was a pack full of fancy equipment, a gps, or even a simple map. They understood implicitly not just the well-worn cliché that it’s the journey not the destination that’s important, but on a deeper level they knew that at its core travel is about freedom, about the unexpected; it is spontaneous, flexible and above all open to what ever may come, an unscripted adventure full of not only new places but also of new people, new friendships, new ways of looking at the world.

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