Chlorine Dioxide No-Mix Water Treatment Solution Coming to US Outdoor Market

Pre-mixed, one-step chlorine dioxide water treatment / disinfection solution. No mixing and easy to use. Say goodbye to iodine.

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by Ryan Jordan | 2005-11-02 03:00:00-07

Chlorine Dioxide No-Mix Water Treatment Solution Coming to US Outdoor Market

BackpackingLight.com to Launch New Chlorine Dioxide Based Water Treatment Product to US Market

A pre-mixed, stable, ready-to-use chlorine dioxide alternative promises ease of use, outstanding efficacy, and proven legitimacy for nearly a decade in military and expedition environments.

Proven chemistry.

Chlorine dioxide is the active ingredient in Aqua Mira, Pristine, and thousands of public and private water treatment facilities in the US and Europe.

Pre-mixed formulation: no wait time to activate solution.

Unlike existing formulations, the new formulation comes pre-mixed and stabilized, with an opened-bottle shelf life suitable for most expedition length events. Refrigeration extends the open bottle shelf life to about eight months.

The pre-mixed product solves the ease-of-use dilemma that is the primary criticism of other chlorine dioxide kits. Simply uncap the bottle, pour a metered dose into the cap, and empty into your water bottle. Wait times for disinfection are similar to other products, ranging from 15 to 30 minutes.

Formulated for multiple uses.

This formulation is a multi-use product with excellent applications for field first aid treatment and hygiene. Cuts and scrapes can be disinfected directly with KlearWater to minimize the chance for infection. It can be used in its concentrated or lightly diluted form for handwashing/disinfection, mouth rinsing/brushing, and fungal control on the feet and in areas prone to chafing.

Exclusive launch distribution to BackpackingLight.com Premium Members.

The new formulation will be available only to BackpackingLight.com Premium Members during its launch period. It is unknown at this time when BackpackingLight.com will make this product publicly available. "We expect the demand for this product to be outpace supply within our subscriber base," says BackpackingLight.com Publisher Ryan Jordan, "and it's very important to be able to put this product initially in the hands of our Premium Membership first, since they are very passionate about trying new products, and giving us their feedback in a short period of time. Then, we can take that feedback back to the manufacturer and adjust packaging, formulations, and usage guidelines before the product hits the mass market. We'll release our supply to the public after demand from Premium Members has been filled first."

Prepurchase Information.

BackpackingLight.com Premium Members may pre-purchase the new formulation beginning November 9, 2005. The first product is expected to ship around November 20, and will be available in 30 mL metering bottles and 50 mL refill bottles. Both kits will be packaged with assorted dropper bottles to facilitate ease of dispensing and reduce volume and kit weight required to take on short hikes.

A pre-purchase announcement will be sent to all active BackpackingLight.com Premium Members on November 9, 2005.


Citation

"Chlorine Dioxide No-Mix Water Treatment Solution Coming to US Outdoor Market," by Ryan Jordan. BackpackingLight.com (ISSN 1537-0364).
http://backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/chlorine_dioxide_clo2_water_treatment.html, 2005-11-02 03:00:00-07.

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Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
AM & KW applications/dosing/strep throat on 11/10/2005 21:26:22 MST Print View

Fred, Paul, and others:

1. Do NOT use AM for mouth rinsing, wound treatment, etc. It's too concentrated. You need to dilute the solution by a factor of 5 or more to use it in this capacity. AM on bare skin can cause topical burns in sensitive areas if left there (nothing particularly harmful, just painful). On mucous membranes and soft tissues, it will cause damage. KW is not as concentrated, and is multi-use by design.

2. Water treated with AM or KW according to mfr directions (e.g., drinkable water) can generally be used within 5 minutes to irrigate a wound. That's when the solution has worked its magic on the pathogens that infect wounds: namely, bacteria (Staph, E. Coli, Strep, and Pseudomonas spp.).

Incidentally, an activated AM solution suitable for treating one liter of water (7/7 drops of A/B) can be diluted into 2-4 oz of water and make a great gargle if you suspect strep throat on a long distance hike. I've used this twice, I have awful tonsils (still in, trying to figure out how much they weight to see if it's worth the $/oz in FSO reduction) and am very prone to strep throat. Rinsing several times a day can buy you time until you can get some antibiotics.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: AM & KW applications/dosing/strep throat on 11/11/2005 03:01:57 MST Print View

Dr. J,

many thanks for taking the time to reply. really appreciate it. your facts confirmed my suspicions.

one last question. what is the half-life of AqM? the point being if i treat water with AqM per the usual method for purifying drinking water, then, at a later time, before that water is consumed, suddenly have a requirement to use it to disinfect a wound, how long after treating water for drinking will it still have a bactericidal action? is this ques. clear?

Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
Re: Re: AM & KW applications/dosing/strep throat on 11/11/2005 07:28:05 MST Print View

>> one last question. what is the half-life of AqM? the point being if i treat water with AqM per the usual method for purifying drinking water, then, at a later time, before that water is consumed, suddenly have a requirement to use it to disinfect a wound, how long after treating water for drinking will it still have a bactericidal action? is this ques. clear?

This answer to this question is not clear with AM. However, it may be relatively clear if you extrapolate similar chlorine dioxide treatment, in say, a municipality. After the water is treated and leaves the treatment plant, it is required to have a residual biocidal effect for as long as the water remains in the distribution system. In larger municipalities, the period of time can be up to several days. Since AM imparts a higher concentration of biocide than that which is normally found in a water municipality....then it "should be ok", right?

Jason Smith
(JasonS) - MLife

Locale: Northeast
Re: AM & KW applications/dosing/strep throat on 11/11/2005 08:45:06 MST Print View

How does ClO2 compare to Provo iodine as an anti-biotic for wound treatment? Is it just useful for irrigation? Just want to know more about using it in a wound treatment capacity.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Re: Re: AM & KW applications/dosing/strep throat on 11/11/2005 09:08:27 MST Print View

Dr. J,

many thanks. exactly the type of answer i was hoping for. so, basically it seems to have a long half-life under certain conditions which limits its exposure to sunlight and, perhaps, oxygen(?).

oh well, if in doubt, then your earlier instructions about, reacting and diluting in at least 5 parts water to 1 part AqM are easy enough to do.

thanks again. have a good weekend.

Fred Baltimore
(fredbaltimore) - F
chlorine dioxide redux on 11/11/2005 20:33:16 MST Print View

Tell me if I am correct or not.
I can use KW directly for water, wounds and for other stuff I want to clean? KW and AM both disinfect water equally providing you measure the right amount of the two bottles of AM and wait the 5 minutes, occasionally in bad weather. I have to dilute AM to use it for wound.
Micropur does only full liters and tastes like crap. Why would I ever order AM or Micropur again? Shelf life; Who keeps their AM bottles a year anyway? Why do we have to wait for this KW anyway, do you have it or not? I just want to order the stuff not write notes.

Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
Re: chlorine dioxide redux on 11/11/2005 20:38:29 MST Print View

>> Why do we have to wait for this KW anyway, do you have it or not?

If I had it I sure wouldn't be hangin' on to it - it would be in all y'alls hot little hands...

It's being shipped from Sweden and BPL will have it in its Bozeman warehouse around the 25th or so.

As for your other questions, yes, you're correct.

Mitchell Keil
(mitchellkeil) - F

Locale: Deep in the OC
KW vs Micropur on 11/14/2005 17:07:58 MST Print View

OK. I am a little late to get back to PJ concerning my comment on Micropur being a "water purifier". (Out of town) Micropur is the only water additive that is EPA registered as a microbiological water purifier. Now, we either accept that the EPA can make these determinations or we don't when it comes to testing and certifying these sorts of things. They have developed the protocols for making these determinations. (If we do not accept the premise that the EPA is qualified to determine such things then all of the pumps that are "EPA registered water purifiers" should not be making the claim and we are in a world of hurt in places where they are being used to "purify" drinking water -- like New Orleans.) Much as I respect Ryan's expertise in many areas, I have no personal knowledge about his qualifications to "test in his lab" the efficacy of any biochemical compound. Nor do I know how his protocols compare to the EPA's. So, absent a peer review of his proceedures to make these claims about KW or any other biochemical process, I will defer to the EPA on this matter. Therefore, I stand by my statement that for the cost, the amount treated and its longer shelf life, Micropur is a qualitatively better product with the added benefit of being EPA registered as a microbiological water purifier, something which KW is not. That one can use it in varying amounts for differrent size water containers is certainly a plus for KW but not "my" point.

I should point out that I have been a user of AM for several years and love it's weight savings and taste nuetrality over pumps and iodine but not its cumbersome utility.


(Anonymous)
Re: KW vs Micropur on 11/14/2005 20:30:14 MST Print View

To use MicroPur MP1 tablets in less than full tablet size, crush the tablet while it is still in the wrapper and then cut it like you do your nose candy in half or in thirds, etc.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: KW vs Micropur on 11/15/2005 01:55:14 MST Print View

Mitchell,

excellent reply. very clear. understand. appreciate the time it took you to author and express both concisely and clearly your prev. meaning. even i get it now - didn't realize that you were speaking of EPA certification as the basis of your statement vs. Mfr's own testing and claims. many thanks.

Edited by pj on 11/15/2005 13:54:21 MST.

Fred Baltimore
(fredbaltimore) - F
EPA, pumps, chemicals, blather on 11/16/2005 12:34:26 MST Print View

I have spoken to a lab that does work for EPA. To register a water "purifier" EPA does a simple test on an indicative virus, bacteria and cyst. These are tested in two types of water, sterile water and so-called type 2 water. Type two water is organice laden as if it were a Georgia mud puddle that has had leaves soaking in it. I have seen it. Camping, I know of no source of sterile water nor have I ever used totally organic laden water. I have hiked for 40 years and have never had to resort to water this filthy. I have the so-called best pump and it clogs on water far less organic-laden than the type 2 water. I have switched to AM and am going to immediately try KW since it is multi use. To my knowledge the active ingredient in MP, AM, KW is the same, just a function of time and dose. note: Why does MP taste so bad if same compared to AM? Therefore just a matter of utility. Micropur does a great job of stating how stupid the EPA testing is with a small informational brochure at the point of sale. I wonder if EPA knows they are doing this?, I'll bet not. I wish AM did the same thing. As opposed to the other writer, I would defer to Ryan not EPA because the products are actually used as I would use them, not in sterile water or mud puddles. Remember, EPA uses the type 2 water directions for ALL USE because they feel we are not capable of telling clear water from filthy water. I would filter filthy water through a cloth anyhow. So much for the directions of all "purifiers." I respect the EPA for much of the enforcement it does to protect our environment but I surely do not think they should have anything to do with water cleaners that are not municipal systems. Doesn't this seem more like FDA territory? Does simplistic lab testing by our government instead of actual field test AND lab test by a competent reviewer give comfort to anyone?